Bone Conduction Info

Discussion in 'Support' started by Sean, Oct 9, 2014.

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    1. Sean

      Sean Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01-01-2011
      Hello All ,
      I had posted 3-4 days back whether a loud car would cause damage to ears even though If I were to wear ear plugs . some one pointed out that sound also goes through bones . I decided to ask my ENT doc who happen to be knowledgable on this topic . He mentioned to me that , there is 40 DB attenuation when sound is transmitted through bones ..so if one wears ear plugs then it's a fairly safe bet .
      Just FYI for you guys about sound conduction via bones .
       
    2. Telis

      Telis Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Calgary
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      I don't understand...how do ear plugs help sound that is conducted via bones?
       
    3. rtwombly
      Bookworm

      rtwombly Member

      Location:
      Southeast USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I think Sean's point was that if you're riding in a 65dB car, the bone conduction is conveying 25dB to your cochlea, so it's much safer.

      Thanks for that info, Sean. Makes me feel better about some unavoidable loud environments I have to be in from time-to-time.
       
    4. Telis

      Telis Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Calgary
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      I just don't understand how earplugs help noise via bone conduction, not sure how blocking the ear canal would help this? For instance I play tennis...the hammering around on the pavement is very loud from the energy/noise produced by my feet hitting the pavement. If blocking the ear canal would help, I would still be playing. The fact is ear plugs do nothing for me except filter out the outside source noise (which is not loud or dangerous) In fact the bone conduction noise produced while playing actually sounds louder when I use ear plugs.

      Another example...if you were to knock on your head lightly, there is almost no noise coming in through the ear canal, plugging your ears would do absolutely nothing except block the outside noise which probably is so low it's not even audible through the ear canal. If you hammered on your head, the bone conduction noise could even be dangerous, while the outside noise traveling into your ear via the knocking sound again would be so low it would barely register on a db meter.
       
    5. Sean

      Sean Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01-01-2011
      Hi Telis - with Tennis you are thumping your bones directly to the ground and my guess is vibration produces sound within your body ( it's my guess )
      I was talking about external sound like music , car noise , gun shots . most of every thing we hear is through ear canal ..only very little sound travels through other medium (bones ). As doctor explained me that , there is 40 DB attenuation when sound is conducted through bones..he told me if you are driving a car that's loud and if ur blocking your ear canal then chances of car noise going in your ear cells is v v low and I should not worry about it at all .
      While playing Tennis..you are thumping your feet on the ground and may be more vibrational energy is going directly through your bones to your ears ..again this is just my theory .
      I am going to consult one more person who is knowledgable in sound mechanics and bone conduction
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
    6. Telis

      Telis Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Calgary
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      Thanks Sean. I agree you get a natural 40db attenuation from noise that can be conducted via bones (after all, the sound has to travel through bone). I'm just saying that you can not get further attenuation (bone conducted noise) from wearing ear plugs. As far as I know you can wear bone conduction headphones with full ear protection and still hear them just as well as if you had no protection at all.

      If you wore a toque with ear muffs, this would be the only way to further reduce noise via bone conduction IMO. I believe you will need something that will actually DAMPEN the sound waves before they hit your head/ear area.

      Just to clarify, I'm only talking about noise conducted via bones.

      Anyway, I could be totally wrong, let me know what you figure out. Interesting post btw.

      Telis
       
    7. Very interesting.
      When i played tennis for the first time with T i noticed how loud it is, i really felt my limits there. Was thinking about plugs but it feels very wrong and as you say it probably dont do any good. I am a goalkeeper in a floorball team as well and when shots hits the helmet i almost want to puke.
       
    8. Telis

      Telis Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Calgary
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      This won't help with the noise generated running around but...do you use a racket silencer? Helps with exterior noise of the racket at least.
       
    9. Yes i do, but playing indoors in a small tennis tent is difficult, the outdoor season here is pretty short.
       
    10. Sjoerd

      Sjoerd Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09-2013
      It feel kind of logical that air borne sound does not easily travel to the inner ear via the bone. The whole outer, middle and inner ear are "designed" t0 be sensitive to pressure changes and keep other vibrations out. If this was not the case we would have allot of difficulty hearing direction etc etc.

      Although, how does this rule hold for vibrations that where never airborne? Vibrations coming from the car seat directly into your body?
       
    11. Sean

      Sean Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01-01-2011
      How much really car vibrates these days ?unless it's an old car it seeems new car dont vibrate as much .
       

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