Follow-up to My Palatal Myoclonus versus Stapedial Post

Discussion in 'Support' started by PoodleChick, Oct 25, 2015.

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    1. PoodleChick

      PoodleChick Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2015
      Several months ago I was on the Introduce Yourself page, saying hi and describing my problem. I was originally diagnosed with palatal myoclonus by two different ENTs. I did not agree with that dx, mainly because there were no palatal spasms to be seen by either doctor. One did say that it was remotely possible that they were so small and in such a hidden area that she could not see them, but it looked to me as if this might be a case of tunnel vision.
      I went to a third ENT, this time one who had experience in neurotology and was in a specialized practice. The diagnosis was tempor tympani and stapedial myoclonus. The treatment was surgery to cut the tensor tendon and stapedial muscle. This update is to tell you how the surgery went.
      In short, it was uneventful. I opted for general anesthesia, though it can be done with the patient in "twilight sleep". I went home the same day. I had zero pain, no nausea, no dizziness and no metallic taste in my mouth. There was a great deal of packing in there that was removed one week after the surgery. It felt good to get that out of there, but I still have all the gelfoam packing in there, which has to dissolve and be absorbed on it's own timetable. Anytime there is fluid behind the eardrum there is irritation to the nerve cells, so with that comes tinnitus. Just not the constant knocking and clicking that I had. As the swelling goes down and the foam absorbs, the ringing decreases. It can be quite high-pitched and annoying, if I focus too much on it. At other times i don't hear it all. It is worse when I am tired or at night or there is alot of ambient noise. I don't notice it at that time, but afterwards it seems worse. Perhaps that is due to the hours that have passed and it is nighttime again and I'm tired. I don't know. I have read and am following the advice of all the people here who have "classic" tinnitus, as opposed to this type that is caused by stuff in the ear. I don't describe the quality of it, if I talk about it I say how I feel about it. I try to avoid very quiet areas when it is loudly "singing". I run a small fan all night, right in my face. I don't dwell on it too much. I am confident that I can habituate to it as I did to the knocking, but hopeful that I won't have to. There is a small portion of the population that never lose the ringing, but since there are times when it just stops, albeit briefly, I am thinking I won't be in that percentage of patients. Nevertheless, it has made me far more empathetic to tinnitus sufferers here and understanding of what my late mother went through with hers.
      Sometimes I just want to tell everyone around me to "STOP TALKING". Yikes, the chatter!
      I would encourage anyone with the same diagnosis to go to a neurotologist and not take any old ENTs word of what it is or what can be done about it. For me, the surgery was seamless.
       
    2. glynis-harbron
      Feminine

      glynis-harbron Member Benefactor Hall of Fame Ambassador Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      England, Stoke-on-Trent
      Tinnitus Since:
      2004
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Meniere's Disease
      Hi Poodle chick,
      Thank you for your up date and hope your ear benefits well from surgery as it settles down in side.
      My son had his ear bones removed when he was 7 and a new ear drum .He is now 20 and leads a normal life with no problems unless gets a cold effecting his ears then his hearing gets lower till it clears....lots of love glynis
       
    3. Nowhearthis

      Nowhearthis Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      MEM
      PoodleChick have you recovered from MEM surgery? Did the procedure provide relief from myoclonus symptoms? I am especially curious if the post surgery T in fact did subside or go away? How are you doing?

      I suffer from the same disorder and considering having the surgery done.
       
    4. PoodleChick

      PoodleChick Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2015
      Yes, the procedure was easy and I had no pain or dizziness afterwards. I opted for general anesthesia instead of conscious sedation. I had both the stapedial and tympanic muscles cut as they said it was pretty much impossible to tell which of the two were spasming. I have slightly less hearing in that ear than I did before but it is highly livable unlike the constant thumping from before. I have a little bit of hissing in that ear now but I quickly habituated to it and now I just ignore it. I would do it again for sure.
       
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    5. PaulBe

      PaulBe Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Cairns
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably sound, though never proven
      Poodlechick,what was the primary set of symptoms you had that made someone consider that surgery was indicated?
       
    6. PoodleChick

      PoodleChick Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2015
      Paul, I had a sudden onset of a fluttering in my left ear, behind the eardrum. That quickly progressed to a rapid (too fast to count) thumping that was not synchronous with my pulse, so it was not pulsatile tinnitus. When I finally went to a specialty center (my earliest post details the other MD trips) I had a hearing test that measures the reaction of the eardrum to sudden noises. They print out a graph and the audiologist asked me if the peaks and valleys on the graph seemed to coincide with what I was hearing at that moment. Why yes, yes it does! The first symptoms began in July and they were nearly continuous until surgery in October of the same year.
       

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