This Is for People Who Can Lower Their Tinnitus with Alcohol

Discussion in 'Support' started by JasonP, Jun 27, 2016.

tinnitus forum
    1. JasonP

      JasonP Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      6/2006
      Okay so I wanted to see what alcohol's effect on the brain is because some people can lower or get rid of their T by drinking alcohol. According to Wikipedia, Ethanol does the following in the brain:


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      Ethanol acts in the central nervous system primarily by binding to the GABAA receptor, increasing the effects of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (i.e., it is a positive allosteric modulator).[76]

      Ethanol is known to possess the following direct pharmacodynamic actions (most important actions are bolded):[77]

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      Notice it says the the most imported actions are GABAa receptor positive allosteric modulator and NMDA receptor negative allosteric modulator. Are there any medications out there that work on these 2 things? Also, if they do, will it make you feel like you would when you are on alcohol? I know drinking alcohol long term can be bad news and perhaps a drug like this would "poop out" over time and maybe make things worse. I know Campral works on NMDA and GABA receptors but not sure if it is a allosteric modulator because I am no chemist. If you guys know if Campral would work somewhat like alcohol let me know because I asked the doctor for it and she said it was for alcoholics not for tinnitus. For me alcohol works really weird. Somehow, atleast for now, it allows my medication to lower T again for a week or two. I have no idea why and I guess I will have to see if that effect still happens in the future. Just figured I would share this with you all.
       
    2. linearb
      Psychedelic

      linearb Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      East Coast USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      1998
      The common medication which is most like ethanol is a benzodiazepine. The only other options are older, more dangerous drugs like chloral hydrate and barbiturates.

      Campral is nothing like alcohol, and in my experience, did absolutely nothing for my tinnitus.
       
    3. JasonP

      JasonP Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      6/2006
      Okay thanks, that makes sense. I don't think benzos work on NMDA receptors but work on GABA receptors but you are probably right. Oh well, it was worth a shot.
       
    4. Beste
      Disappointed

      Beste Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      02/16/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Benzo/Clonazepam, Stress
      I have a friend who got hearing loss and tinnitus from benzo withdrawal. He only used Xanax for 3 month and he tapered but this fucking drug left him this freaking condition for 2 years now. Couple months ago he drank quite heavily and he said his tinnitus got so much worse after that. So I'm really really afraid of drinking even a bottle of beer. God know how I missed it! Do you think his condition worsen due to his alcohol drinking? He drank a bottle of Rakı (a Turkish alcohol which is very strong) by himself.
       
    5. JasonP

      JasonP Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      6/2006
      Oh wow that is terrible. I don't know. :( Was his tinnitus permanently increased after the alcohol or did it go away?
       
      • Good Question Good Question x 1
    6. Beste
      Disappointed

      Beste Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      02/16/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Benzo/Clonazepam, Stress
      I think it got permanently worse. He needed to seek doctor help again..
       
    7. JasonP

      JasonP Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      6/2006
      Wow that is terrible :(
       
      • Agree Agree x 1

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