Typical Concert dB Level

Discussion in 'Support' started by Greg Clarke, Jun 16, 2015.

tinnitus forum
    1. Greg Clarke

      Greg Clarke Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Wicklow, Ireland
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2006
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma, Live Music
      Hi All,

      I know there's been a few threads on concerts but I have a slightly different angle. I've decided I'm definitely going to hit a few shows over the coming months.

      I was however trying to find out what a typical dB level would be at an average show. The only thing I can find online states that a loud rock concert is in excess of 120dB. As a musician myself and someone who has attended many shows over the years my guess is that level is referring to large arena concerts with pyro etc and not a typical show in a small to medium sized venue. I do realise that it will vary depending on the band but would those with experience agree that a typical medium sized rock gig falls in the 85-95dB bracket??

      Having never measured it myself I'm at a bit of a loss and I've also exhausted the route of mailing a few venues to ask for figures but so far not one of them has responded.

      Thanks in advance
       
    2. SoulStation
      No Mood

      SoulStation Member Ambassador Team Tech

      Location:
      New York
      Tinnitus Since:
      2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise / Possible Medication
      I'd say its more in the 100-115 dbA range but it all depends on where you're standing in relationship to the speakers/acoustics of the room/amount of sub-bass frequencies.
       
      • Agree Agree x 2
    3. Greg Clarke

      Greg Clarke Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Wicklow, Ireland
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2006
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma, Live Music
      Could be in that bracket alright, but I was thinking that would be nearer the stage. Forgot to add I'd have no intention of standing that close!

      Thanks for responding
       
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    4. Ricky81
      Worried

      Ricky81 Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      July 14, 2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Assault/Contusion/Ear Infection
      Noise meter app on Android works great.
       
    5. awbw8
      Balanced

      awbw8 Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2013
      @Greg Clarke I would definitely agree with Soulstation here. A relatively loud bar is easily 95 db, add music - it's that or above, even away from the speakers. I would say that's average for a small medium sized gig - you also have to remember in small rooms, the sound is reverberating off walls, too.

      For a large stadium concert, 120 db is not out of the question. That's how I got my T. It was so loud there was a moment where my ears physically hurt - not like "wow that's loud" but as if someone had cut me, which apparently only occurs at about 120 or so. It probably isn't that loud the whole time, steadily, but it peaks there.

      Open air concerts are probably a little safer if you're way back, but always wear those earplugs :)
       
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    6. linearb
      Psychedelic

      linearb Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      East Coast USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      1998
      Be careful with this; I've compared it side by side on a Nexus 5 and a real dB meter. The two are exactly the same up to about 85db, which appears to be the clipping level for the mic on my phone. So, for volumes loud enough to actually be concerned with them, my phone is inadequate and may provide a false sense of security.

      I actually duct-taped the db meter to my motorcycle on a ride yesterday, because I wanted to get an accurate view of dB level at road speed.
       
    7. LadyDi
      Busy

      LadyDi Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Florida, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2013
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Barotrauma/airplane
      I would have to say I would not base any decision on a dB meter phone app. Not accurate enough. My guess is there will be a huge range anyway -- depends on everything from the type of venue, type of music, where you stand.

      I think we tend to over-think these things, particularly since you don't have a lot of control over the noise level. If you have decided you want to try going, then go.

      If it was me, I would pick: a smaller gig in an open venue, preferably outdoors, for my first outing. I would stand near the back, take 1800 mg of NAC before I went, then 1200 mg daily for two days after, take periodic breaks completely away from the noise, and wear protective ear muffs (like the kind machinists wear) over my ear plugs. Also, if it was me, I would not go to an arena show or one with pyrotechnics, period. But that's just me.
       
    8. Greg Clarke

      Greg Clarke Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Wicklow, Ireland
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2006
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma, Live Music
      Thanks for all the responses lads. Anyone out there got an accurate measurement?
       
    9. Nucleo

      Nucleo Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2011
      Some apps, on iOS only are surprisingly very accurate.

      From this article : http://blogs.cdc.gov/niosh-science-blog/2014/04/09/sound-apps/

      In conclusion, smartphone sound apps can serve to empower workers and help them make educated decisions about their work environments. They may be useful for industrial hygienists and OS&H managers to make quick spot measurements to determine if noise levels exist in a workplace that can harm workers’ hearing. The ubiquity of smartphones and the availability of these sound measurement apps may also present new research opportunities for occupational hearing scientists and researchers.​
       
    10. linearb
      Psychedelic

      linearb Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      East Coast USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      1998
      (You're probably aware of this, but for anyone who isn't): Apple typically uses extremely high quality components, but, more importantly, because there is only one kind of iphone of any given generation, app developers know with absolute certainty what hardware their code is running on. If you're developing an Android app to assess dB level, you have no insight at all into what microphone and sound board you're getting audio data from.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    11. and what was it..

      and wow you lucky man.
       
    12. linearb
      Psychedelic

      linearb Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      East Coast USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      1998
      It's mid-to-high 90s mostly; spikes to low 100s. I think that at real highway speed it probably maxes around 110.

      High 90s is not especially worrying to me with 32db NR plugs inserted properly, but it's still more than I really think I should be dealing with. I am planning on selling it, and then getting an electric motorcycle in the spring; they are more or less silent. Earplugs are still an absolute requirement, though, because at 75 mph, wind noise can exceed 90db.
       

Share This Page

Loading...
If you have ringing ears then you've come to the right place. We are a friendly tinnitus support board, dedicated to helping you discuss and understand what tinnitus treatments may work for you.