New Here, Noise-Induced Crackling in Ear

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Britton, Jul 19, 2015.

tinnitus forum
    1. Britton

      Britton Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2000
      About 4 weeks ago while listening to my headphones, I noticed what I at first thought was the right speaker of my headphones shorting out or going bad. I then noticed that I was starting to hear this "crackling" everywhere. If I am in a totally quiet place, I don't hear it at all, but other things make me hear what I can only describe as a broken speaker or Rice Crispies crackling in milk. Music makes it crackle, the TV if it's above a low volume, some people's voice, and even weird things like a water faucet running, crinkling of potato chip bags and urinating in the toilet. I sometimes wonder if it is because of the headphones being too loud or because a lot of times I would hop right out of the shower and throw them on with wet ears. I went to my doctor, she looked in my ear and said she could see fluid behind my ear drum. She put me on an antibiotic and after I was done with the antibiotic, it was no better. I went back to her and she looked in my ear again and said she couldn't see the fluid anymore, but that didn't mean it wasn't in the rest of my middle ear. She also said if fluid is in the middle ear, it could take months for it to go away. She was sure this was what was causing my crackling noise. She said to wait two weeks to see if it got better. Well, it didn't. I took the Claritin she told me to, Nasonex, etc. I even read online that people that take a lot of vitamin D like I do every week have depleted magnesium in their body and this can cause ear crackling. I think the crackling MIGHT be a bit better than it was at first. It seems like I can listen to the TV a bit louder and the running faucets don't seem to set it off quite as much. The crackling is still there, but it might be less loud than it was before. Either that, or I'm just used to it a bit. Anyway, she set me up with an ENT in a few weeks. Wondering if anyone has this problem? I talked to my dad's doctor who his kind of a family friend and is more experienced than my doctor. He said mid doc was right, the fluid can take months to drain and he had a patient that it took 8 months to drain. I have NO hearing loss, I can hear out of that ear just fine. Two weird things is that when I take a shower, it almost goes completely away. I don't know if it's from the warm steam or if my ears "get used to it". Also, if it's kind of bad, if I open my mouth REAL wide it goes away completely for a split second.
       
    2. billie48
      Sunshine

      billie48 Member Benefactor Hall of Fame Ambassador Team Research

      Location:
      Vancouver, Canada
      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2009
      t
      The shower is a high pitch sound. So if you T has similar high pitch sound, then it will cause a special effect called 'Residual Inhibition' (google it), causing T to appear much lower. This may be a temporary effect though.
       
    3. Britton

      Britton Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2000
      That makes sense, but why does it go away when I open my mouth real wide?
       
    4. billie48
      Sunshine

      billie48 Member Benefactor Hall of Fame Ambassador Team Research

      Location:
      Vancouver, Canada
      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2009
    5. 2014winner
      Inspired

      2014winner Member

      Location:
      upstate New York
      Tinnitus Since:
      1999
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      otitis media with permanent hearing loss
      Check out research on tinnitus and hearing loss conducted by University of Buffalo.
       
    6. Britton

      Britton Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2000
      Well, two months into this and I'm still having issues. Two months ago is when I first noticed this and for 5 weeks it was horrible. Every little thing set it off. Went to the doc, twice. First time she said she saw fluid behind the eardrum, second time she said she couldn't see anything. She set me up with an ENT. For the next week and a half the crackling became less and less. I still heard it when I heard noise, but it was less loud. Saw the ENT, he looked down my throat, in my nose and both ears, said everything looked fine. That coupled with the fact I told him it was getting better made him say it should go away on its own and there was no need to go headlong into a bunch of scans and tests. He said to make another appointment in two months if it didn't totally go away. The next few days it got a bit better yet, and the last week and a half it's got none better. So, it's I'd say… 70% better than it was, but it's still there and now I'm worried it won't totally go away. And I'm still left wondering what it was. My doc said listening to loud music can cause "aural trauma" where the muscle behind the eardrum pulls a bit on the eardrum a bit, and he also said it could still be fluid in there and it can take a while to be absorbed into the body. All I know is it still drives me crazy. I haven't listened to music in 2 months and music is my life. Literally, since I'ma music journalist. The sound of running water is still my biggest enemy.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    7. AnnaD

      AnnaD Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      August 25, 2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Hi Britton,

      I found your comments regarding the crackling noise in your ear when I started having the same thing happen to me a few days ago. It is exactly as you described it — especially that the sound of running water seems to trigger it most of all.

      Since the "solution" you found was to wait until the noises in your ear went away, I wonder if you have had any luck with that since your symptoms began about a year ago. Has the crackling noise stopped?

      Hopefully you are still checking into this website. If so, your reply would be greatly appreciated!
       

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