Brain Regions Responsible for Tinnitus Distress and Loudness: A Resting-State fMRI Study

Discussion in 'Research News' started by Greg Sacramento, Jun 18, 2017.

    1. Wolfears

      Wolfears Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Jan 20/2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely accoustic trauma
      Yes that is quite unfortunate...most doctors these days are just trained pill prescribers without the ability to connect the dots.
      Logic tells me that a pill that can make you temporarily deaf should not be that hard to engineer.
       
    2. Steven__

      Steven__ Member Benefactor

      Location:
      California
      Tinnitus Since:
      2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud noise exposure, TMJ
      I was thinking the same but also think that doctors just look over your overall heath then send you to a specialist if need
       
    3. Danny Boy
      Cheerful

      Danny Boy Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      England
      Tinnitus Since:
      7/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection
      Trust me, they say that a cure will be out every 5 years, doesn't happen sadly. It's to instill hope, to those people who have it severe. So they can measure loudness of your tinnitus now? I thought they just normally place a headphone on you with frequencies and once those frequencies surpasses your tinnitus they can establish how loud your tinnitus is and the frequency. But this is most intriguing, but unlikely to be practised everywhere unfortunately.
       
    4. Liam_Cairns

      Liam_Cairns Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2008
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Originally loud Music and was worsened by Micro-suction
      Idk, I think considering how fast things are moving that I reckon there just might be, Ive have tinnitus for 10 years and back in those days there was nothing but snake oil.
       
      • Agree Agree x 2
    5. Danny Boy
      Cheerful

      Danny Boy Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      England
      Tinnitus Since:
      7/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection
      The only thing that truly lowered my tinnitus was trobalt, but it's dangerous and can cause Visual snow. Drug trials take longer than 3 years, even 5 years. If they have an FDA fast track maybe, but I don't see a drug targeted for tinnitus as of yet. Well, AM-101, but that turned out to be a failure and it took 10 years to get to phase 3. We have to be realistic. I know how bad tinnitus can get, because I had it 10/10 with with reactive tinnitus. I cured hyperacusis, thanks to trobalt working on KV7.4 and KV7.3. (KCNQ4)
       
    6. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
    7. Liam_Cairns

      Liam_Cairns Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2008
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Originally loud Music and was worsened by Micro-suction
      Sorry to hear about the visual snow I know how shit that can be, I developed it as a side effect of my tinnitus wayy back. But like tinnitus I like habituated to it, it's really weird. It took a few years but now its just another part of me. I hope you find respite. But yeah honestly either of us could be wrong we really dont know what the future will hold, I just think that there is just wayyy more going on now and that gives me hope :).
       
    8. Danny Boy
      Cheerful

      Danny Boy Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      England
      Tinnitus Since:
      7/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection
      Of course more people are getting tinnitus, but there's no awareness of it really. Like on headphones, just says loud volumes may cause hearing loss, should be loud volumes may cause hearing loss and tinnitus. Not too much to ask for.
       
    9. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Tinnitus distress: a paradoxical attention to the sound?
      • Sivayini Kandeepan[​IMG]
      • Audrey Maudoux[​IMG]
      • D. Ribeiro de Paula
      • J. Y. Zheng
      • J. E. Cabay
      • F. Gómez
      • B. A. Chronik
      • D. Ridder
      • S. Vanneste
      • A. Soddu
      Abstract
      Tinnitus, the perception of sound in the absence of external stimuli, is often a disturbing symptom for which the underlying functional neuroanatomy still remains poorly understood. Most studies have focused solely on functional connectivity changes in the auditory cortex of tinnitus patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a correlation exists between tinnitus behavioural scores and functional brain connectivity of five resting-state networks comprising the auditory, the default mode, the external control left and right, and the salience network. For this purpose, a large sample of one hundred and thirty-five subjects underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and their behavioural scores were obtained using clinical evaluations. Networks were extracted using independent component analysis, and functional connectivity patterns in the extracted networks were evaluated by a graph theoretical approach. The effects of tinnitus for each network were investigated by correlating the graph strength of all the regions with the tinnitus behavioural scores using stepwise fit regression analysis. Results indicated that alterations of functional interactions between key neural circuits of the brain are not limited to one single network. In particular, tinnitus distress showed a strong correlation with the connectivity pattern within and between the right executive control network and the other four resting-state networks, indicating that tinnitus distress is probably the consequence of a hyperactive attention condition. Among the behavioural scores, the strongest correlation was observed between age and hearing loss, while the tinnitus objective loudness was not correlated with any behavioural scores.

      Keywords
      Tinnitus Resting-state networks Graph theory Distress Executive control network

      Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00415-019-09390-1
       

Share This Page

Loading...