Cochlear Hydrops

Discussion in 'Support' started by Darren Knight, Sep 26, 2013.

tinnitus forum
    1. Darren Knight
      Ape-like

      Darren Knight Member

      Location:
      Cambridge UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      08-2013
      Hi guys,

      I've just returned from seeing the ENT specialist and got the all clear on my MRI scan. He did however say, that my condition sounds like Cochlear Hydrops, which is a build up of fluid within the inner ear chamber. I am already taking a 5 day course of Prednisone steroids, plus he has now prescribed a 6 week course of Betahistine 16MG. Does anyone else suffer with this and could they explain more as to what helps and what doesn't.

      Take care,

      Darren
       
    2. Per

      Per Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2013
      What do you mean by "all clear on the MRI scan"? Does that mean you are going to take an MRI or does it mean that you have already had one? And why do you scan? What is the aim? Since theres no way of scanning the inner ear I'm curious to know what lies beneath this approach. Thanks for sharing.
       
    3. insane_inspiration
      Inspired

      insane_inspiration Member Benefactor

      Location:
      India
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2013
      @Per; I'm not sure about this, but I think he meant that he's had his MRI scan already, and the report does not show anything wrong. And the reason for an MRI scan is generally to rule out Acoustic Neuroma(tumor in the brain). Acoustic Neuroma causes tinnitus too, hence ENT's sometimes suggest for an MRI scan.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    4. Darren Knight
      Ape-like

      Darren Knight Member

      Location:
      Cambridge UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      08-2013
      Hi Per, insane inspiration got it spot on. Not much more I can add.

      Take care
       
    5. Per

      Per Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2013
      @Darren Knight and @insane_inspiration,

      I know that in very rare occasions a tumour could be causing T but there's no way of scanning the inner ear with any technology available today as the anatomy of the inner ear are hidden under very thick bone structure. The magnetic scan does't reach it so it's impossible to retrieve a visual reference to the inner ear to rule out damages to cochlea, dead hair cells etc. The microscopic images of the inner ear anatomy that exists today are from dead people. They also study the same structures in animals of course. I know that some scientist are trying out laser technology to "scan" the inner ear safely, by adding fluorescent color to specific cells.

      Well, I was just curious if you were scanning with some new technology that I hadn't yet heard of. Would love to know if my inner ear is damaged or not, but as of now there's just no way of telling. I remember talking to a surgeon about this and he didn't sugar coat it, he just said he would potentially kill the patient if he went in there to look, either with key hole surgery or other instruments because of the delicate location. Don't know if all surgeons would agree but getting those inner ear parts scanned is one big challenge.

      Good to know that the scan you did to rule out any tumorous came out good Darren Knight.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    6. Sound Wave
      Curious

      Sound Wave Member Benefactor Team Tech

      Location:
      Finland
      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2013
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones
      I am resurrecting this thread, because an ENT I just saw, commented I might have cochlear hydrops. I found this article interesting, which mentions 'anomalies in the region of the mastoid in these patients', which is another symptom I seem to have at least in the form of trigger point / fascial pain in various areas of the head and neck. Ping @Mr. Cartman the guru of this area.

      http://www.tinnitusjournal.com/detalhe_artigo.asp?id=474
       

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