Migraines, pain medication and tinnitus :(

Discussion in 'Support' started by derpytia, May 17, 2014.

    1. derpytia
      Pooptoast

      derpytia Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Rescue, California
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Hearing loss / ETD
      Yikes I had an ocular migraine today (I get them rarely but when they happen, ouch!) and thankfully, the worst of it is over. I'm just feeling kinda achy in the head and sluggish. But I didn't take any pain meds because I know most of them are ototoxic. What kind of pain meds do you take and do they affect your T?
       
    2. Lynnette
      Blah

      Lynnette Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Aug 2013
      I take motrin or tylonol for my really bad headaches...it doesn't have an effect on my T anymore. It might of in the past but I was also getting on an antidepressant then as well.
       
    3. Actually opiates seem to be o.k
       
    4. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Association of Tinnitus and Other Cochlear Disorders With a History of Migraines
      Juen-Haur Hwang, MD, PhD1,2; Shiang-Jiun Tsai3; Tien-Chen Liu, PhD4; Yi-Chun Chen, MD2,5; Jen-Tsung Lai,

      Question
      Does a history of migraines increase the risk of tinnitus and other cochlear disorders?

      Findings In this cohort study of claims data among patients in Taiwan, 1056 patients with a history of migraines and 4224 controls were identified. The cumulative incidence of cochlear disorders, especially tinnitus, was found to be significantly higher among patients with history of migraines than those without a history of migraines.

      Meaning A history of migraines may increase the risk of tinnitus and other cochlear disorders.

      Abstract
      Importance A headache is a symptom of a migraine, but not all patients with migraine have headaches. It is still unclear whether a migraine might increase the risk of cochlear disorders, even though a migraine does not occur concurrently with cochlear disorders.

      Objective To investigate the risk of cochlear disorders for patients with a history of migraines.

      Design, Setting, and Participants This study used claims data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 to identify 1056 patients with migraines diagnosed between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2012. A total of 4224 controls were also identified from the same database based on propensity score matching. Statistical analysis was performed from January 23, 1996, to December 28, 2012.

      Main Outcomes and Measures The incidence rate of cochlear disorders (tinnitus, sensorineural hearing impairment, and/or sudden deafness) was compared between the cohorts by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was also used to examine the association of cochlear disorders with migraines.

      Results Of the 1056 patients with migraines, 672 were women and 384 were men, and the mean (SD) age was 36.7 (15.3) years. Compared with the nonmigraine cohort, the crude hazard ratio for cochlear disorders in the migraine cohort was 2.83 (95% CI, 2.01-3.99), and the adjusted hazard ratio was 2.71 (95% CI, 1.86-3.93). The incidence rates of cochlear disorders were 81.4 (95% CI, 81.1-81.8) per 1 million person-years for the migraine cohort and 29.4 (95% CI, 29.2-29.7) per 1 million person-years for the nonmigraine cohort. The cumulative incidence of cochlear disorders in the migraine cohort (12.2%) was significantly higher than that in the matched nonmigraine cohort (5.5%). Subgroup analysis showed that, compared with the nonmigraine cohort, the adjusted hazard ratios in the migraine cohort were 3.30 (95% CI, 2.17-5.00) for tinnitus, 1.03 (95% CI, 0.17-6.41) for sensorineural hearing impairment, and 1.22 (95% CI, 0.53-2.83) for sudden deafness.

      Conclusions and Relevance In this population-based study, the risk of cochlear disorders, especially for tinnitus, was found to be significantly higher among patients with a history of migraines. This finding may support the presence and/or concept of “cochlear migraine.”

      Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/article-abstract/2687206
       
    5. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma

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