Pulsatile Tinnitus Changing Pitch

Discussion in 'Support' started by stab, Jul 14, 2014.

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    1. stab

      stab Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2009
      Hi,

      I'm 28 years old and 'suffer' from pulsatile tinnitus for at least 5 years now. Probably had it longer, but can't really remember it.

      Went to the doctor for it a couple of times, but they are thinking that it's just a 'harmless' version of pulsatile tinnitus, so I should just live with it.

      Lately I sense that the pitch has become slightly lower and the volume slightly higher. It was a pretty high pitched humming sound and it is still, but just became a bit lower pitched and more audible.

      So what exactly is responsible for the pitch of this kind of tinnitus? Does it mean the blood is rushing through my veins faster? Or slower? And what could cause that?

      Any opinions about this?
       
    2. Karen
      Talkative

      Karen Manager Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Ambassador

      Location:
      U.S.
      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      First time: Noise 2nd Time: Ototoxic drug
      Hi, Stab,

      I'm a fellow PT sufferer, so I do understand what you're going through. I've been to a number of doctors and had several tests, all of which came back negative. So, for now, I am "living with it".

      You may be right that the change in pitch is due to change in your blood flow. There are so many variables about this condition that it's hard to say. Have you checked your blood pressure lately to determine if there has been any significant change?

      A couple of questions:
      1) Do you also have ringing tinnitus, along with the pulsatile tinnitus?
      2) Have you had an audiogram, and do you have any hearing loss?
      3) Do you have PT in one ear, or both?
      4) Do you know of anything unusual that happened to you five years ago? Accident? Illness? Etc.
      5) Have you had any tests for this condition, to rule out problems? (Tests such as CT scan, MRI, etc.)

      I wish you well, and hope you find some answers soon!

      Best wishes,
      Karen
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    3. stab

      stab Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2009
      Hi Karen,

      Thanks for your reply. I just figured that the pitch change has to do with the speed / amount of blood flowing through the veins next to my ears, but who knows what it is.
      My blood pressure was last checked a couple of months ago and was fine. The PT becomes less loud / disappears when I turn my head / twist my neck or put pressure on the right backside of my neck. Because of this, my GP decided that it is a a harmless variant of PT.

      1) I do have a 'regular', continious tinnitus but luckily not very loud.
      2) No audiogram, but no apparent hearing loss IMO.
      3) The PT sounds like it is 'in my head', maybe slightly more to the right side but it doesn't sound like it is in 1 ear.
      4) Not that I remember. I do remember vaguely hearing sounds at night when I was a child.
      5) No tests were done, besides general things in GP's office. (listening heart rate, listening to neck veins and measure blood pressure)

      Thanks for you interest and reply!
       
    4. Karen
      Talkative

      Karen Manager Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Ambassador

      Location:
      U.S.
      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      First time: Noise 2nd Time: Ototoxic drug
      Hi, @stab,

      Thanks for your responses! It's good that you went to your GP, and he checked you out. You're lucky to be one of those with PT who can put pressure on a spot and have the pulsating go away for a moment. Mine isn't like that; no matter what I do, it is constant.

      I'm glad to hear that your blood pressure and other vital signs are normal. That's a good sign that nothing serious is wrong. Still, it is good to be observant of your PT, in case it does get any worse. Then, you might want to go to an ENT, neurologist, or neurotologist to be checked out, just to be sure all is well. If yours doesn't bother you, however, you probably don't need to do anything right now.

      There are apparently two schools of thought on PT: (1) If nothing is found amiss by your doctor and you feel well otherwise, learn to "live with it". That is in direct contrast to the other school of thought, which is (2) If you have PT, keep on going to doctors and being tested until you find a cause for your PT. So far, I am more in line with the first school of thought! But, in my case, that's because I feel otherwise healthy and have had several tests, all of which were negative.

      I wish you well, and hope you'll stay in touch. It's possible that your PT changed pitch because it is gradually subsiding. I hope so!

      Best wishes,
      Karen
       
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