The Neuroscience of Tinnitus

Discussion in 'Research News' started by erik, Oct 30, 2012.

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    1. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      Tinnitus-related neural activity: Theories of generation, propagation, and centralization



      Abstract

      The neuroscience of tinnitus represents an ideal model to explore central issues in brain functioning such as the formation of auditory percepts, in addition to opening up new treatment avenues for the condition in the long-term. The present review discusses the origin and nature of tinnitus-related neural activity. First, we review evidence for the hypothesis that tinnitus is caused by the central nervous system changes induced by sensory deprivation, even when hearing loss is not visible in the audiogram. Second, we suggest that changes in neural activity in individual central structures may not be sufficient to underlie the tinnitus percept. Instead, we propose that tinnitus may arise from functional alterations at multiple levels which promote abnormal propagation of neural activity throughout the network involved in auditory perception. In this context, functional coupling within and between central auditory structures may be especially important to consider. Investigating how sensory deprivation affects functional coupling between areas, which might be reflected in changes in temporal coherence of intrinsic ongoing activity patterns, may give critical insights into the mechanisms of tinnitus.

      Full Article Link
       
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    2. mock turtle

      mock turtle Member

      Location:
      puget sound
      Tinnitus Since:
      07/26/1992...habituated after 2 years; 11/04/11 new outbreak
      i need to re read the article more than two more times

      but one of many big take-aways for me is the sentence that said tinnitus may become sourced from the brain center over time...or words to that effect

      thanks erik for the research
       
    3. Chicken

      Chicken Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      October 2011
      i could read that article a few times and still cannot decipher what it is trying to say. can't they just say things that we "non-scientific" people can understand. can anyone intrepret it? i'm curious on what they mean but central nervous system and normal audiogram.
       
    4. Karl

      Karl Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Chicago
      Tinnitus Since:
      10/2011
      Same here: Goobledy-gook.
       
    5. mock turtle

      mock turtle Member

      Location:
      puget sound
      Tinnitus Since:
      07/26/1992...habituated after 2 years; 11/04/11 new outbreak
      yes it is dense reading but i would suggest.... this is what has worked for me

      i use wikipedia, google , bing what ever... search terms one by one.... sentence by sentence if need be

      eventually you will become conversant in the language of neuro scientists etc and it all will make more sense

      dont give up

      struggle with the words, you will get there
       
    6. Chicken

      Chicken Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      October 2011
      i agree with Karl but can anyone intrepet all that goobedly-gook for me. what does it all mean in reference to those without hearing issues
       
    7. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      I am not a scientist but I believe it is trying to say that tinnitus is a change in our nervous systems caused by sensory deprivation, meaning that if there is a a loss or some loss of one of our senses and in the case of tinnitus hearing, then it causes neural changes within our brain. What is meant by the line "even when hearing loss is not visible in the audiogram" is that even if your audiogram shows "normal" hearing there is still more than likely some type of hearing loss even if minor and this loss causes the changes in our brain. Audiograms only show a certain range of human hearing which is considered the normal range. But human hearing range can be much greater than the standard audiogram. You can have hearing loss at much higher frequencies, but those will not show on a standard audiogram, and still have tinnitus. These are the people referred to as having tinnitus with "no hearing loss" but in fact there probably is some. I fall into that category. I have no loss up to about 13K. That was only discovered with a high frequency audiogram.

      Furthermore, these neural "brain" changes happen at multiple levels and regulating these feedback mechanism changes in the central auditory system "may give critical insights into the mechanisms of Tinnitus". This in turn will lead to more effective treatment options. Studies now are already showing that because our brains are plastic, it may be possible that auditory training/stimulation using rTMS (magnetic therapy) and other therapies, can alter the response properties of neurons in auditory pathways and reduce or eliminate tinnitus.
       
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