Tinnitus and Diabetes

Discussion in 'Support' started by mike, Apr 14, 2012.

    1. mike

      mike Member

      Location:
      Franklin ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      1 1/2 months
      Does anyone have both tinnitus and diabetes and if so, how do you manage both of these at the same time?
       
    2. gary
      Transparent

      gary Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Macomb, MI. USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Who Knows
      Hi Mike, I have both. I got the diabetes first, then a few heart attacks, cancer, then I had to have open heart surgery on May1st. Then just as I am healing from the surgery I get the tinnitus. Guess what I am trying to say is I am just glad to here, with the noise all that tinnitus causes.

      I deal with tinnitus like I do with the diabetes, it is something I have, and I really don't have much say so, I just made up my mind literally to not let this have any power over me and I can learn to live with it. The tinnitus may go away, it may not. either way you have to be stronger than the condition you are dealing with.

      Are you type one or type two diabetic?

      I am type two taking pills and insulin...
       
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      mike

      mike Member

      Location:
      Franklin ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      1 1/2 months
      I am taking pills and Victoza. Type 2 diabetes. This week marks 6 months now and I am not handling it very well. I have to take pills at night just to sleep. For about the last 3 months I was thinking it was getting a little better but the last 3 weeks it has been raging.
       
    4. Serge Rivest

      Serge Rivest Member

      Location:
      Australia
      Tinnitus Since:
      2010
      That may be quite significant actually. According to this ENT, there is a link between hyperinsulinemia and tinnitus:
      Kenneth Brookler New York Aug 2015
       
    5. MichaelThompson

      MichaelThompson Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2014
      Tinnitus is a disease causing "ringing in the ears" and affecting approx 50 million adults in the U.S. It creates concentration and sleeping problems in patient. There are no clear causes of tinnitus identified yet, however, long exposure to loud sound is considered as the primary factors leading to this disease. Tinnitus sufferers also have high blood sugar levels and impaired insulin metabolism.
       
    6. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Investigation and analysis of tinnitus in diabetic patients.

      Abstract
      Objective:
      To analyze the influencing factors of tinnitus in diabetic patients and the correlation between hearing loss and tinnitus.

      Method:

      Participants were patients with diabetes. Subjects were tested for hearing function and tinnitus symptoms by questionnaire and pure tone audiometry.

      Result:

      ①112 patients (55 were men and 57 were women) were affected by tinnitus symptoms in 255 patients with diabetes,there were no significant differences between the number of male patients and female patients(P=0.278).②The incidence of tinnitus increased with age (≤30 year: 40%, 31-40 year :25%, 41-50 year: 27%, 51-60 year: 43%, >60 year: 55%),and there was significant differences in the number of patients among different age (P=0.001).③The incidence of tinnitus was no significant difference in diabetes patients with different educational level (P=0.648).④Totally 83 subjects who complained hearing impairment were tested for hearing loss by pure tone audiometry, while 113 (66%) of 172 subjects who insisted their hearing were normal had hearing loss. Of the subjects with normal hearing but tinnitus, 72% had hearing loss and 62% of patients without tinnitus actually had hearing loss.⑤There were statistically significant in patients with diabetes between the incidence of tinnitus and low/intermediate frequency hearing loss or high frequency hearing loss.

      Conclusion:

      The incidence of tinnitus symptoms is increased in patients with diabetes mellitus, which may be related to the age, the incidence of hearing loss, however, may be irrelevant to gender and educational level. Diabetic patients with tinnitus symptoms should be tested as soon as possible to achieve early intervention.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29798136
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
    7. Jim Goose

      Jim Goose Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      ????
      Bumping this thread and the research above^^^

      My tinnitus started in March. I’ve gone through every scenario as to how I got it and I’ve concluded the following.

      I got vertigo in January after taking Lexapro. But I had some personal problems and was eating out a lot. In May I found out my diabetes was totally out of control. A1c was 11. That’s insanely high.

      So I think the initial damage was in January, but that high blood sugar is my biggest problem. So I’ve got it back under control, basically took the month off work, worked out everyday, and it did help.

      I’m still dealing with some very bad tinnitus at times, but I think if you are diabetic you have to put that at the top of the list to take care off. Your ears rely on blood flow to be healthy. You can lose your eyesight with diabetes and I now believe you can damage your ears with diabetes. That research proves it.
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
    8. Elmer B Fuddled

      Elmer B Fuddled Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      plugged nasal eustachian tube
      I've both of them. Diabetes is more important than the tinnitus. Myself I ignore the tinnitus and leave that sweet crap in the bin. In all the research on both diseases the diabetes wins. If we don't take care and eat properly we can go blind, have a toe amputated. Tinnitus doesn't come close.
       
    9. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Diabetes and Auditory-Vestibular Pathology

      Abstract
      The relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and the auditory/vestibular system has been investigated for more than a century. Most population-based investigations of hearing loss in persons with diabetes (PWD) have revealed a slow progressive, bilateral, high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Despite the growing research literature on the pathophysiology of DM-related hearing loss using various animal models and other human studies, knowledge of specific mechanism of the degenerative changes of the inner ear and/or auditory nerve is far from full elucidation. Recent investigations of the mechanisms underlying the association between hearing loss and DM suggest complex combined contributions of hyperglycemia, oxidative stress resulting in cochlear microangiopathy, and auditory neuropathy. An even lesser understood complication of DM is the effect on the vestibular system. Here we provide an overview of animal and human evidence of pathophysiological changes created by DM and its effects on auditory-vestibular anatomy and function.

      Full text: https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/html/10.1055/s-0039-1697033
       
    10. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Epidemiology of Diabetes and Hearing Loss

      Abstract
      Hearing loss is a highly prevalent chronic condition. In addition to age, sex, noise exposure, and genetic predisposition, cardiovascular disease and its antecedents may precipitate hearing loss. Of emerging interest is the connection between diabetes and auditory dysfunction. Cross-sectional studies consistently suggest that prevalence of hearing loss is higher in persons with diabetes compared with those without diabetes, especially among younger persons. Furthermore, longitudinal studies have demonstrated higher incidence of hearing loss in persons with diabetes compared to those without diabetes. These findings seem to hold for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, although considerably more population-based evidence is available for type 2 diabetes. Data on gestational diabetes and hearing outcomes are limited, as are data relating diabetes to otologic sequelae such as fungal infection. Here, we examine evidence from epidemiologic studies of diabetes and hearing loss and consider clinical and laboratory data where population-based data are lacking.

      Full text: https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/html/10.1055/s-0039-1697643
       
    11. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Evaluation and Management of Patients with Diabetes and Hearing Loss

      Abstract
      Diabetes mellitus is a significant risk factor for acquired hearing loss and tinnitus. Persons with diabetes (PWD) may present with hearing loss symptoms earlier in life than those without diabetes. Furthermore, diabetes may exacerbate risk for hearing loss related to noise exposure and ototoxic drugs. The purpose of this article is to provide recommendations for the prevention, screening, evaluation, and management of hearing loss in PWD.

      Full text: https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/html/10.1055/s-0039-1697644
       
    12. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Auditory and Vestibular Side Effects of FDA-Approved Drugs for Diabetes

      Abstract
      As of September 10, 2019, there were 75 medications (oral/injectable/inhalants) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for diabetes management: 1 inhalant, 21 oral combinations, 22 injectable, and 31 oral medications (not in combination with any other diabetes drug). This article isolates the auditory and vestibular side effects of those drugs as reported by the drug's manufacturer as well as those side effects that could interfere with a balance assessment. Twenty of the 75 approved medications (26%) could have an auditory-related side effect. Hearing loss and tinnitus are not on the list. Only two, or just 3%, have vertigo and spinning as reported side effects (one each). More than 50% of the drugs will have some effect on a balance assessment. Audiologists who evaluate a patient with diabetes (PWD) are presented with symptoms that could be related to their diabetes medication. Although the manufacturer might report a side effect as rare or as a percentage from their clinical trials subjects, not all PWD will experience these adverse events. Auditory and vestibular side effects do not dominate the diabetes drug side effect list, but, rather, the most reported side effects could impact a balance assessment. The lists that appear in [Appendices A] and [B] should serve as a guide for all professionals involved in managing the PWD (i.e., audiologists, otolaryngologists, diabetes educators, pharmacists, optometrists, dentists, etc.). The list also serves as a counseling tool if a communication problem emerges during the progression of the diabetes.

      Full text: https://www.thieme-connect.com/products/ejournals/html/10.1055/s-0039-1697645
       

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