Tinnitus Etiologies Determine Pitch and Minimum Masking Levels

Discussion in 'Research News' started by jazz, May 13, 2014.

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    1. jazz
      No Mood

      jazz Member Benefactor

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      8/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      eardrum rupture from virus; barotrauma from ETD
      A recent article looked at "data of 509 ears" to determine if etiology affected tinnitus pitch and minimum masking levels (MML) and found both to be true. Of interest, tinnitus from recent noise trauma required in one of the lowest minimum masking levels and tinnitus from aging required one of the highest.

      Here's the abstract of the article:

      Int J Audiol. 2014 Mar 31. [Epub ahead of print]

      Tinnitus pitch and minimum masking levels in different etiologies.
      Zagólski O1, Stręk P.
      Author information
      • 1* ENT Department, St. John Grande's Hospital , Kraków , Poland.
      Abstract
      Objective: We sought to determine whether the results of audiological tests and tinnitus characteristics, particularly tinnitus pitch and minimum masking level (MML), depend on tinnitus etiology, and what other etiology-specific tinnitus characteristics there are. Design: The patients answered questions concerning tinnitus laterality, duration, character, aggravation, alleviation, previous treatment, and circumstances of onset. The results of tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry, distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, tinnitus likeness spectrum, MML, and uncomfortable loudness level were evaluated. Study sample: Patients with several tinnitus etiological factors were excluded. The remaining participants were divided into groups according to medical history: acute acoustic trauma: 67 ears; chronic acoustic trauma: 82; prolonged use of oral estrogen and progesterone contraceptives: 46; Ménière's disease: 25; congenital hearing loss: 19; sensorineural sudden deafness: 40; dull head trauma: 19; viral labyrinthitis: 53; stroke: 6; presbycusis: 152. Data of 509 ears were analysed. Results: Tinnitus pitch was highest in patients with acute acoustic trauma and lowest in patients receiving estrogen and progesterone. MML was lowest after acute acoustic trauma and in congenital hearing loss, and highest after a stroke and in the case of presbytinnitus. Conclusions: Tinnitus pitch and MML are etiology dependent.

      Reference:

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24684405
       
      • Informative Informative x 2
    2. dan
      Chatty

      dan Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2011
      Not in my experience. I have noise trauma induced and its unmaskable and a lot of others I know.
       
    3. jazz
      No Mood

      jazz Member Benefactor

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      8/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      eardrum rupture from virus; barotrauma from ETD
      The authors noted "acute acoustic trauma." Acute means recent. We don't know what they reported for chronic acoustic trauma. You'd have to read the article, not just the abstract.

      But I do know tinnitus sounds often change. My tinnitus resulted from a barotrauma, and it was maskable for a few weeks. Then it shifted and became unmaskable. I think this experience is common.

      Nevertheless, these findings are interesting. And they may have treatment implications.

      At the 2014 TRI meeting, researchers noted the following:

      Tinnitus researchers agree that there may never be a single cure for tinnitus, but instead a range of treatments for different types of tinnitus will be needed.

      Developments in bioengineering technology may lead to the development of tools needed to identify each type of tinnitus.

      This was the consensus when more than 200 researchers from 20 countries were in Auckland recently to discuss treatment of tinnitus or “ringing” in the head or ears.​
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
    4. Mr. Cartman
      Artistic

      Mr. Cartman Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Norway
      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2013
      This is great research! Thanks for sharing!
       

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