Diet's Effect on Tinnitus

Discussion in 'Treatments' started by Shay O'Connor, Aug 29, 2012.

tinnitus forum
    1. Shay O'Connor

      Shay O'Connor Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/12/2012
      Hi

      Im just wondering if anyone has had any appreciable effect on their t by a complete overhaul of diet?

      Im considering going much more fruit and veg based (no more big macs for now!)

      I would be very interested to hear some feedback..

      Another interesting thing for me in relation to this and other positive general lifestyle choices (such as exercising or sleeping more) is that the reaction to the t certainely improves (for me exercise has made it less of an apparent threat and improved my acceptance of it).

      Sometimes for me this is interpreted as a lowering of the volume but in hindsight i think it, as i say, is merely an improved reaction. Whatever the case it make life a bit more bearable..

      take care folks...
       
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    2. Markku
      Inspired

      Markku Director Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing
      • Informative Informative x 1
    3. Molan
      No Mood

      Molan Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2005
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    4. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      For me, changing my diet probably made a difference to my overall health and well being, but not sure if it has helped my tinnitus. In the beginning (for the first couple of months) I tried low sodium, cutting out all sugar, caffeine and even went gluten free for a while. None that those changes affected my T, but I am sure my body appreciated it.

      I have since been much less restrictive and enjoy everything in moderation. The doctor at OHSU said to follow the 80-20 rule. Be good 80% of the time, eat what you want the other 20%. I have caffeine daily, eat a little more sugar (I don't go overboard) and eased up on low sodium everything.

      So far there are no negative changes to my T. In fact, my T now is much lower than the first 3 months. However, I attribute most of the improvement to "time" passed, much lower stress levels, back to exercising, my acceptance of the T and most of all -getting back to 90% of my normal life before T.
       
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    5. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      MSG, mono-sodium glutamate, has long been implicated as making tinnitus worse for tinnitus sufferers because MSG is an excitotoxin, which causes neurons to overexcite. I too have had some success and lower noise days when I tried to avoid MSG as much as possible. Unfortunately, it is in everything not just Chinese food it is known for.

      MSG Myth

      What is MSG and Hidden Sources of It

      MSG, or monosodium glutamate, is a processed food additive. It is an extremely dangerous neurotoxin (excitotoxin) that shrivels and kills brain cells in the hypothalamus and has been linked to migraines, seizures, ADD/ADHD, heart palpitations, tremors, and MANY other symptoms that can even be fatal. I know it was partly responsible for my constant daily headaches (for about 20 years) and the two years of migraines every day that led to a hospitalization, more drugs that did nothing but cause side effects and years of misery.

      What is the hypothalamus?
      The hypothalamus is a portion of the brain, located just above the brain stem, roughly the size of an almond. Though small, it’s incredibly important as it is responsible for certain metabolic processes and other activities of the autonomic nervous system. One of the most important functions of the hypothalamus is to link the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland. The hypothalamus controls body temperature, hunger, thirst, fatigue, sleep, and circadian cycles.

      What is an excitotoxin?
      An excitotoxin is a chemical that causes a brain cell to become overexcited and fire uncontrollably, leading to cell death. MSG (and other excitotoxins like asparatame) has the potential for inflicting permanent damage to the brain and nervous system. These chemicals also cross the placental barrier, harming the brains of unborn children.

      Ok, so I should just avoid MSG and aspartame, right?
      Absolutely. However, you need to know that there are over 40 hidden names for MSG on food labels. FORTY?!? Yes. 40! 4-0.
      So, foods labeled NO-MSG or MSG-Free (think Chinese restaurants) may not have actual MSG added to it, but if they contain any of these ingredients, there is STILL MSG IN THE FOOD!
      Here is more information from truthinlabeling.org

      Names of ingredients that ALWAYS contain processed free glutamic acid:
      Glutamic acid (E 620)
      Glutamate (E 620)
      Monosodium glutamate (E 621)
      Monopotassium glutamate (E 622)
      Calcium glutamate (E 623)
      Monoammonium glutamate (E 624)
      Magnesium glutamate (E 625)
      Natrium glutamate
      Yeast extract
      Anything “hydrolyzed”
      Any “hydrolyzed protein”
      Calcium caseinate, Sodium caseinate
      Yeast food, Yeast nutrient
      Autolyzed yeast
      Gelatin
      Textured protein
      Soy protein, soy protein concentrate
      Soy protein isolate
      Whey protein, whey protein concentrate
      Whey protein isolate
      Anything “…protein”
      Vetsin
      Ajinomoto
      *Glutamic acid found in unadulterated protein does not cause adverse reactions. To cause adverse reactions, the glutamic acid must have been processed/manufactured or come from protein that has been fermented.

      Names of ingredients that often contain or produce processed free glutamic acid:
      Carrageenan (E 407)
      Bouillon and broth
      Stock
      Any “flavors” or “flavoring”
      Maltodextrin
      Citric acid, Citrate (E 330)
      Anything “ultra-pasteurized”
      Barley malt
      Pectin (E 440)
      Protease
      Anything “enzyme modified”
      Anything containing “enzymes”
      Malt extract
      Soy sauce (a reader has informed us that Russell Blaylock, MD states in his book, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, that soy sauce ALWAYS contains MSG)
      Soy sauce extract
      Anything “protein fortified”
      Anything “fermented”
      Seasonings

      The following are ingredients suspected of containing or creating sufficient processed free glutamic acid to serve as MSG-reaction triggers in HIGHLY SENSITIVE people:
      Corn starch
      Corn syrup
      Modified food starch
      Lipolyzed butter fat
      Dextrose
      Rice syrup
      Brown rice syrup
      Milk powder
      Reduced fat milk (skim; 1%; 2%)
      Most things low fat or no fat
      Anything “Enriched”
      Anything Vitamin enriched
      * E numbers are use in Europe in place of food additive names.

      The following work synergistically with MSG to enhance flavor. If they are present for flavoring, so is MSG.
      Disodium 5’-guanylate (E 627)
      Disodium 5’-inosinate (E-631)
      Disodium 5′-ribonucleotides (E 635)

      Low fat and no fat milk products often contain milk solids that contain MSG and many dairy products contain carrageenan, guar gum, and/or locust bean gum. Low fat and no fat versions of ice cream and cheese may not be as obvious as yogurt, milk, cream, cream cheese, cottage cheese, etc., but they are not exceptions.

      Protein powders contain glutamic acid, which, invariably, will be processed free glutamic acid (MSG). Individual amino acids are not always listed on labels of protein powders.
      At present there is an FDA requirement to include the protein source when listing hydrolyzed protein products on labels of processed foods. Examples are hydrolyzed soy protein, hydrolyzed wheat protein, hydrolyzed pea protein, hydrolyzed whey protein, hydrolyzed corn protein. If a tomato, for example, were whole, it would be identified as a tomato. Calling an ingredient tomato protein indicates that the tomato has been hydrolyzed, at least in part, and that processed free glutamic acid (MSG) is present.

      Disodium guanylate and disodium inosinate are relatively expensive food additives that work synergistically with inexpensive MSG. Their use suggests that the product has MSG in it. They would probably not be used as food additives if there were no MSG present.

      MSG reactions have been reported from soaps, shampoos, hair conditioners, and cosmetics, where MSG is hidden in ingredients with names that include the words “hydrolyzed,” “amino acids,” and/or “protein.” Most sun block creams and insect repellents also contain MSG.
      Drinks, candy, and chewing gum are potential sources of hidden MSG and/or aspartame, neotame, and AminoSweet (the new name for aspartame). Aspartic acid, found in neotame, aspartame (NutraSweet), and AminoSweet, ordinarily causes MSG type reactions in MSG sensitive people. (It would appear that calling aspartame “AminoSweet” is industry’s method of choice for hiding aspartame.) We have not seen Neotame used widely in the United States.
      Aspartame will be found in some medications, including children’s medications. For questions about the ingredients in pharmaceuticals, check with your pharmacist and/or read the product inserts for the names of “other” or “inert” ingredients.

      Binders and fillers for medications, nutrients, and supplements, both prescription and non-prescription, enteral feeding materials, and some fluids administered intravenously in hospitals, may contain MSG.

      According to the manufacturer, Varivax–Merck chicken pox vaccine (Varicella Virus Live), contains L-monosodium glutamate and hydrolyzed gelatin, both of which contain processed free glutamic acid (MSG) which causes brain lesions in young laboratory animals, and causes endocrine disturbances like OBESITY and REPRODUCTIVE disorders later in life. It would appear that most, if not all, live virus vaccines contain some ingredient(s) that contains MSG.
      Reactions to MSG are dose related, i.e., some people react to even very small amounts. MSG-induced reactions may occur immediately after ingestion or after as much as 48 hours. The time lapse between ingestion and reaction is typically the same each time for a particular individual who ingests an amount of MSG that exceeds his or her individual tolerance level.

      Here’s what Sally Fallon has to say about the health effects of MSG, in her fantastic piece, “Dirty Secrets of the Food Processing Industry”:
      While the industry was adding MSG to food in larger and larger amounts, in 1957 scientists found that mice became blind and obese when MSG was administered by feeding tube. In 1969, MSG-induced lesions were found in the hypothalamus region of the mouse brain. Subsequent studies pointed in the same direction. MSG is a neurotoxic substance that causes a wide range of reactions in humans, from temporary headaches to permanent brain damage. It is also associated with violent behavior. We have had a huge increase in Alzheimer’s, brain cancer, seizures, multiple sclerosis and diseases of the nervous system, and one of the chief culprits is the flavorings in our food.

      Ninety-five percent of processed foods contain MSG, and, in the late 1950s, it was even added to baby food. Manufacturers say they have voluntarily taken it out of the baby food, but they didn’t really remove it; they just called it “hydrolyzed protein” instead.

      An excellent book, Excitotoxins, by Russell Blaylock, describes how nerve cells either disintegrate or shrivel up in the presence of free glutamic acid if it gets past the blood-brain barrier. The glutamates in MSG are absorbed directly from the mouth to the brain. Some investigators believe that the great increase in violence in this country starting in 1960 is due to the increased use of MSG beginning in the late 1950s, particularly as it was added to baby foods.”

      Remember: By food industry definition, all MSG is “naturally occurring.” “Natural” doesn’t mean “safe.” “Natural” only means that the ingredient started out in nature, like arsenic and hydrochloric acid.

      When you eat real, whole foods, you automatically avoid MSG, asparatme and other excitotoxins. No need to memorize the whole list of different food additives and E numbers, simply skip the processed junk and EAT REAL FOOD!
       
      • Like Like x 4
    6. Molan
      No Mood

      Molan Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2005
      Absolutely brilliant post Erik. Some real important information there. MSG and Aspartame are poisons and should be avoided at all costs. They should never have been in our food supply in the first place.

      Can I clarify something? I read in your post that anything fermented contains MSG? Does that mean only when it says fermented on the label or does that apply to any foods you can ferment yourself at home?
       
    7. click
      Busy

      click Member Benefactor

      Location:
      West Cornwall, England, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/04/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Not sure
      Gosh erik - that's a long list!

      My T is screaming & stopping me concentrating so if someone has a list of foods that don't contain it.. that'd be brilliant.

      I'm think fresh food and veg will be ok but now wondering whether soil conditioners / fertilizers etc. could affect them too. We're going to be awfully slim by the end of this :)
       
    8. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      Yes. MSG is present in fermented foods. The fermentation process creates MSG but from what I understand this MSG is better tolerated by the body than manufactured MSG.

      I want to add that there is no real evidence MSG is harmful. It has been used for over 100 years and according to FDA "is generally recognized as safe" if you want to believe the Government. But I know I really feel better when I avoid these foods as much as I can. Maybe it is because MSG tends to be in all the crappy, unhealthy foods and just avoiding these types of foods makes me feel better anyway. And many tinnitus sufferers report better tinnitus when they choose these foods less often.
       
    9. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
    10. Molan
      No Mood

      Molan Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2005
      Interesting Erik, I was told that certain foods fermented naturally with no artificial additives were actually very good for people because of all the friendly bacteria they contain. I do not remember reading that the process creates MSG at all. I will have to research this further.

      I saw a documentary a while ago now and if my memory serves me right there seemed to be quite alot of evidence that MSG is extremly harmful to people. A few Doctors were saying it literally creates holes in your brain. I will need to go back and watch that film again. Personally I don't trust hardly anything the FDA states given their horrific track record with countless things in the past.

      Thanks again for the information.
       
    11. calin
      Inspired

      calin Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Oct 2011
      Wowie!

      Very enlightening. I knew that about MSG, but not the other ingredients.

      Geez... eating is going to be a task!
       
    12. Cookie

      Cookie Member

      Location:
      New York, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/11
      Did you know that herbs and spices that you have in jars and you add to your foods also contain MSG. Horrible. They sell some on the internet without them. And even if you buy your food in a health food store it also has MSG. Especially the soup.
       
    13. mock turtle

      mock turtle Member

      Location:
      puget sound
      Tinnitus Since:
      07/26/1992...habituated after 2 years; 11/04/11 new outbreak
      WOW
       
    14. Cookie

      Cookie Member

      Location:
      New York, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/11
      Diet is everything. My T was an 8 always and now it is a 3 since I changed my diet. No tea, spicy food, low salt, no take-out, organic, lots of fruit and vegetables, no MSG, home cooking, no liquor. Sometime I cheat and I suffers for 48 hours before it calms down. Diet is everything.
       
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    15. click
      Busy

      click Member Benefactor

      Location:
      West Cornwall, England, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/04/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Not sure
      My nights were pretty quiet for quite a while but then I had four nights of dreadful T in a row up until last Friday night. Daytime T was fairly low and I could cope at that level but the nights were awful.

      I read Cookie's posting that she made at lunch time on Saturday 29th Sept. saying that tea affected her T and I immediately stopped drinking tea (PG Tips - and I made it strong!).

      That night it was quiet! But the following morning I had a MASSIVE headache (caffeine/tannin withdrawal) so I had just a couple of very weak cups that day.

      Upshot of it is that I have now had 4 peaceful nights (Sat, Sun, Mon & Tuesday).

      So thank you Cookie - it may have been coincidence but it also may have been the tea!

      Coffee doesn't affect my T but I don't drink a lot of it.
       
    16. oliver
      Stressed

      oliver Member

      Location:
      london
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2011
      I agree with cookie, I think diet has a massive effect on my T. I know it does. Whenever I drink alcohol, smoke, or drink coffee my T shoots up for 2-3 days. Its a big shame as I love those 3 things! I have managed to pretty much stripped coffee from my diet (i can no longer deal with the caffeine either as it makes me anxious), but I find it extremely difficult to steer clear from alcohol.
       
    17. Polar-Bear

      Polar-Bear Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2012
    18. Petloy
      Happy

      Petloy Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Canada
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2012
      Hi I'm going on a strict MSG free diet, I'm running out of idaes (or my wife is) LOL can anybody share recipes for Salads, chicken , beef or any vegetables? Thanksssss!!

      Peter
       
    19. DezDog
      Angry

      DezDog Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2009
      Everything we cook at home is MSG free; do you actually have a pot of it you'd normally have added to your cooking? We avoid stock cubes, packet soups and are careful about the crisps (chips) we eat.

      Meals we eat:

      - roasted vegetables (onions, peppers, garlic, mushrooms, aubergine/eggplant) with pasta (use a tomato-based sauce, or pesto). Grate cheese over it.

      - spaghetti bolognese (minced beef/lamb cooked with onions, tinned tomatoes,)

      - roast chicken, with roasted potatoes, parsnips, carrots. Deglaze roasting tin to create gravy, mix cup of water with cornflour to thicken. Make a mash out of swede (rutabaga) + parsnip + carrots, use stock in gravy.

      - Sausages (watch out for MSG) with swede(rutabaga)+parsnip+onion+carrot mash, baked beans. To make mash, chop all veg quite small, add no more than about a cup of water, so it basically steams itself. You don't want to throw that tasty stock away.

      - Chicken fajitas ; stir fried chicken, peppers, onions with flour tortillas, salsa, sour cream

      Hope that helps..
       
    20. click
      Busy

      click Member Benefactor

      Location:
      West Cornwall, England, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/04/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Not sure
      Hi Peter,

      Nothing I eat on a day to day basis contains MSG to my knowledge - and I'm also trying to avoid high nitrate content since sodium nitrate sent my T into a complete frenzy.

      I find that I have to buy organic fruit and veg (because the nitrates have built up in the soil in the UK) and organic chicken, lamb & steak. Also, the only fish I eat is Alaskan Wild Salmon because mercury deposits are low (another T danger!). I have to avoid prawns because I had an allergic reaction to them a couple of years back but I tend to avoid all shellfish/tuna etc. anyway because of the high toxin content.

      Organic free range eggs a couple of times a week don't seem to cause any problems. Sauces, marinades and dressings are a minefield - so many have nasty ingedients. So I make my own with organic passata/herbs etc.. Organic stock cubes over here tend not to contain any nasties.

      Watch out for the ingredients in bread - sometimes contain stuff you really wouldn't expect!

      I never buy sausages, minced beef/lamb or burgers etc. and I avoid all processed food (but then I did before the T).

      Obviously this is 'normal day to day living' and when you go out or eat at friends' houses it can be difficult.

      I'm now avoiding all tea (which I'm very upset about) and can only drink water and cappaccinos (first thing) which don't affect my T even though all types of coffee do make it spike - weird.

      I know I'm over cautious so please don't feel you should suddenly live like this.

      I sometimes wonder whether going back to being a vegan would help my T - I stopped being one when I had a nasty reaction to soya milk.

      Jane
       
    21. Petloy
      Happy

      Petloy Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Canada
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2012
      Dez...can I use canned tomato sauce for my pasta? @Jane...do you put any seasoning in your Salmon? Thanks guys!!
       
    22. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
    23. DezDog
      Angry

      DezDog Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2009
      Sure - if you use canned chopped tomatoes, then consider chopping some fresh basil leaves into it. Maybe add some pine nuts.
       
    24. click
      Busy

      click Member Benefactor

      Location:
      West Cornwall, England, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/04/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Not sure
      Peter, I use olive oil for all dressings and for salmon I just mix with a freshly squeezed lemon. You can mix in a little manuka honey too if you want a sweeter taste & if you want it spicy just add a touch of chilli (chopped really finely).

      You can make lovely MSG free snacks by lightly toasting some sunflower & pumpkin seeds in some grapeseed oil - they're delicious. You can add spices if you like too.

      Try some nut roast - absolutely gorgeous - take a load of unsalted cashew and hazlenuts - wholemeal breadcrumbs - lots of chopped onions - heaped teaspoon of sage - jar of organic passata - 1 roasted butternut squash & 1 sweet potato plus black pepper (no salt!). Mix all the cooked ingredients together and aim for a thickish consistency. Shove in loaf tins and bake slowly until edges come away from sides of tins.

      Again you can spice these up - we add fresh cranberries at Christmas.

      Apologies if any of these ingredients have different names in the US.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    25. mock turtle

      mock turtle Member

      Location:
      puget sound
      Tinnitus Since:
      07/26/1992...habituated after 2 years; 11/04/11 new outbreak
      petloy

      there are a gazzillion code words for mono sodium glutamate

      here is a few

      monopotassium glutamate,
      glutamic acid
      hydrolyzed vegetable protein,
      textured protein,
      hydrolyzed plant protein,
      yeast extract,
      autolyzed plant protein,
      yeast food
      natural flavoring

      note msg is produced by yeast during many fermentation processes

      to avoid msg...shop the outer perimeter of your food store...that is avoid all canned and jarred foods that have long lists of ingredients

      or, in other words...cook whole foods...buy your meat, fish, poultry, vegetalbes, pasta rice potatoes etc and cook and season yourself

      btw i make my own tomato sauce, its easy..saute some mushrooms onions garlic with olive oil and chopped or blended whole ripe tomatoes...hmmmmmmm good

      good luck and best wishes
      mt
       
    26. DezDog
      Angry

      DezDog Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2009
      Yikes -- Marmite can be considered MSG? Expletive.
       
    27. unik

      unik Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2013
      Guys,

      My T changes a lot. I mean a lot. I have multiple layers - one it's a very high pitch hissing sound, another that is just kind of like humming noise and, the one that bothers me the most, very high pitch modulating one (hard to match it but I think it's in 12,000hz - 14,700hz range). That last one is the one that bothers me the most. It can get very loud and annoying at times and, while it was only in my left ear for the last 3 months, it now also started in my right ear.

      My question is, everyone talks about diet and things that can make their T worse. How soon after eating something can I know if it had a negative effect? Is it immediate? 1 hour? 1 day? How do people know, and can say with confidence, that an ice cream caused their T to spike? Hopefully it makes sense what I'm asking for.
       
    28. calin
      Inspired

      calin Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Oct 2011
      The only way I can tell is if I eat something I wouldn't normally eat every day. I don't eat ice cream everyday for example.

      Hours to the next day. If it goes back to the regular level after that day, then I can assume it was what I ate that was not in my regular eating pattern.

      Just my impression....
       
    29. click
      Busy

      click Member Benefactor

      Location:
      West Cornwall, England, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/04/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Not sure
      Hi Unik

      I ate gammon (a bacon joint) last week for the first time since getting tinnitus just over a year ago and the sodium/salt content made my T scream very loudly for almost 4 days. The screeching began the morning after I'd eaten gammon in the evening.

      If I have a rice cracker I get a 'spike' for around 30 minutes immediately after eating it.

      If I have a cup of 'normal' tea my tinnitus will screech late that evening.

      So different things have a different effect and their effect begins at different times for me.

      I believe that we all have different levels of sodium in our bodies to start with and therefore the effect of consuming the same amount will be different for each individual. Also that some of us may be more sensitive to it than others.

      It's not just salt and tea for me either. There are other things that have an effect.

      I realise that diet doesn't help some others with T but I've been testing this for quite some time now and I know that it's true for me. I eliminated everything and reintroduced foods, one at a time, over quite a long period.

      If I control my diet, then I control my tinnitus - to the point where it is either not there or almost not there. It could change - one day I may find that I can't control it with diet because something else has happened or tinnitus has too strong a grip on me... but for now I do have the element of control - which is great.

      Click
       
      • Like Like x 1
    30. Markku
      Inspired

      Markku Director Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing
      @unik & @click
      I merged the diet discussion with a previous one, so we'll have a nice topic discussing all this...
       

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