Does Anyone Have Hyperacusis Symptoms Like Mine? Anxiety and Neck Muscle Related?

Discussion in 'Support' started by AE Anderson, Mar 10, 2021.

    1. AE Anderson

      AE Anderson Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Stress
      I have been checked by an ENT and an audiologist and have no hearing loss or any other obvious problems that may have led to this. I think it's all anxiety and neck muscle related.

      Here's my symptoms: if I am in a perfectly quiet room (and if I'm not having a panic attack) I experience a slight hiss in both ears and a slight ring in my right ear. However, If I am exposed to any droning, continuous noise, such as a fan, heater or A/C running, or in the shower, or any other prolonged sounds longer than 10 minutes or so, my tinnitus cranks up to intolerable levels with extreme hissing, ringing and harmonica sounds accompanied by pain in the ears, temples and neck.

      If I then insert ear plugs, in about 40 minutes, the noise goes away and I'm left with a soft hiss and barely a little "mosquito" ring in the right ear.

      My sound tolerance for quick everyday noises, such as dishes clinking together, normal speaking, is fairly good. My ears are only slightly sensitive to those brief sounds, but when normal noises go on and on for several minutes, the tinnitus increases drastically until I completely remove myself from the source of noise. In the morning, my ears are normally very quiet.

      Is this hyperacusis? Do others have these symptoms?
       
    2. Diesel

      Diesel Member Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      1-2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      20+ Years of Live Music, Motorcycles, and Power Tools
      Yes, this is hyperacusis. Also, you were told you have no hearing loss, but did you have an Extended High Frequency audiogram (8 kHz - 16 kHz)?
       
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      AE Anderson

      AE Anderson Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Stress
      I don't know if I had that test. My ENT/audiologist was not very helpful. Just the usual "learn to live with it." It started in 2015, got better over a period of 3 years, disappeared for two years, and has returned about two weeks ago after I split a few pieces of wood. I think the shrill sounds of hammering on a metal wedge activated it again. I'm feeling pretty bad about it. I thought I had won the battle, but apparently not!
       
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    4. Zugzug

      Zugzug Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Autoimmune hyperacusis from Sjogren's Syndrome
      Hyperacusis has nothing to do with anxiety. Your ENT told you that because the cochlea cannot be properly biopsied so saying it's anxiety is just easier.

      In my opinion, this has the makings of developing pain hyperacusis that's not full blown yet. I would protect your ears, avoid headphones/earbuds, and give it time. If something causes symptoms, avoid it. "Overprotection" has nothing to do with pushing through pain.

      Reactive tinnitus is not hyperacusis per se, but it is very common for people with hyperacusis to have it. Some argue that reactive tinnitus (by itself) is almost like pre-hyperacusis. I hope it improves for you.
       
    5. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      AE Anderson

      AE Anderson Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Stress
      Thank you for your response. "Reactive tinnitus" is a good description of what I'm experiencing. I also have hyperacusis, which can indeed be initiated by anxiety. That's how mine started. I had been an emotional wreck for months when it started. Here are two articles on anxiety-provoked hyperacusis:

      Acute Stress Induces Hyperacusis in Women with High Levels of Emotional Exhaustion

      Psychiatric Comorbidities and Hyperacusis
       
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