Extremely Unusual Tinnitus Manipulation — Squeezing Head/Temples

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by AnthonyMcDonald, Aug 10, 2021.

    1. AnthonyMcDonald
      Confused

      AnthonyMcDonald Member

      Location:
      Russia
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced/Neurological/Unknown
      Hey everyone. This is my first post! I'm glad there's a community of people out there who suffer from the same condition.

      From what I've seen, a lot of people here have read through a lot of threads. Although I've been browsing around for quite a while, I still haven't been able to find anything similar to my exact tinnitus case.

      My tinnitus is a very high pitch ~13,000Hz ringing.

      Has anyone seen a situation similar to mine?

      "Normal" tinnitus modulation:
      1) Bend neck to the left - 2-3x increase in loudness on the left (bending neck to the right does nothing)
      2) Move chin back/inward/press down to chest - 2-3x increase in loudness

      Unusual modulation:
      If I squeeze or press my temples/side of head in the right spot/general area (in front and above of the ears, pretty much in the middle of the head, NOT the TMJ) my tinnitus decreases in loudness by 80-90%, and when I let go it spikes very hard (2-3x loudness) for like a second and evens out (EEEEeeeeee).

      sidehead.png

      I've searched all over the internet and haven't found anyone with the same effect. Maybe some of the veterans here have seen something like this?

      Thanks.
       
    2. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      AnthonyMcDonald
      Confused

      AnthonyMcDonald Member

      Location:
      Russia
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced/Neurological/Unknown
      Bump?
       
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      AnthonyMcDonald
      Confused

      AnthonyMcDonald Member

      Location:
      Russia
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced/Neurological/Unknown
      Anyone?
       
    4. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      If you sometimes get headaches, then the problem most likely is with your cervical spine. This can include injuries or degenerative conditions, such as osteoarthritis. A bulging disk most common cause, even a very slight one. A tensed sternocleidomastoid muscle (left side) is also very possible.

      Second most common with addition to any C-spine degenerative condition, is forceful or jerking of shoulders and one wouldn't need to get headaches.

      Neck X-rays are suggested to start with as to what is described in first quote.
       
      • Winner Winner x 1
    5. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      AnthonyMcDonald
      Confused

      AnthonyMcDonald Member

      Location:
      Russia
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced/Neurological/Unknown
      Hey Greg! I've seen many of your posts and am very grateful for your reply! You're a legend here.

      I do have a slightly herniated C3 - C4 disk as well as osteochondrosis and some small growths to the side on my spine. Is there any way to treat this condition?

      Can cervical spine issues also cause hyperacusis? As I suffer from moderate hyperacusis.

      Cheers.
       
      • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
    6. DimLeb

      DimLeb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      14/03/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Idiopathic Cochleopathy Or Maybe Loud Music
      @AnthonyMcDonald, some of those modulations also apply to me. I got mild tinnitus from some idiopathic cochleopathy according to my neuro-otologist (or maybe noise after all). It fluctuates a lot.

      My tinnitus is a tone (or maybe 2) in the head centre and some soft white noise hissing at either side (mostly in left ear). Sometimes the neck bending increases the white noise at that side that I bend it. It almost sounds like an air exhaust opens up lol. I imagine that bending makes the cochlear nerve move (?) a bit so it changes what the brain receives? I don't know!

      Also, in my left ear there are 2 independent layers of white noise, one of which I can modulate with the jaw clenching and releasing. If I clench the teeth of my left side jaw, I can reduce that white noise by 90% and when I let it, it restarts (ssss...).

      Interesting stuff...
       
      • Like Like x 2
    7. anonymoose

      anonymoose Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Neck injury
      I believe the auricular nerve runs through that area. Can you look up an anatomy diagram and see if that's what you're pressing on?
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    8. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      Relaxing neck muscles/shoulders and using good posture. Magnesium Glycinate might help by taking one third of a 400 mg tablet, three times daily. Using 600 mg, divided into six pieces and taken six times daily can help more, but who can remember to do this six times a day. Liquid form works better. For you, all of this should help tinnitus.
      Yes - 6% of the time. If cause was from concussion or whiplash - 52%. Longer than three months is 15%, but for those that don't practice good posture it's 28%. Hyperacusis should go away by practicing good posture.
       
      • Hug Hug x 1
    9. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      AnthonyMcDonald
      Confused

      AnthonyMcDonald Member

      Location:
      Russia
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced/Neurological/Unknown
      I believe what I'm pressing on is the Auriculotemporal nerve...

      Based on diagrams of what I've seen.
       
    10. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      AnthonyMcDonald
      Confused

      AnthonyMcDonald Member

      Location:
      Russia
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced/Neurological/Unknown
      I discovered that if I flex my jaw (not clench, just keep it open a bit and flex) a few times - EEEEeeeEEEeeeeEE - it changes my high pitch ring into a high pitch hiss for 2-3 minutes.
       
    11. DimLeb

      DimLeb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      14/03/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Idiopathic Cochleopathy Or Maybe Loud Music
      @AnthonyMcDonald, hmm I guess it's something to do with the jaw joint pressing on the cochlea or nerves passing by. I only wish someone could explain all these modulations and put them into use... Like sub-categorizing tinnitus types and helping with treatments. Pffff.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    12. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      Somatic systems are very complicated and because of "all that can be humanly possible" needs to be considered on an individual basis. I have posted many generalist posts on jaw, neck and facial, but I often need to go "one on one" to see if I can note a single cause or multiple interactions.

      The peripheral nervous system consists of the nerves and ganglia outside of the brain and spinal cord. The autonomic occurs involuntarily, without conscious control. Part of the peripheral nervous system transmits signals from the central nervous system to skeletal muscles, and from receptors of external stimuli, thereby mediating sight, hearing, and touch. All this is just a part of anatomy and other complexities of what may be going on.

      Continued thought:

      Often skeletal muscles place pressure on the C spine from strain postural positions and that then can cause all sort of problems. Structural jaw problems is one. Anything somatic can direct to the ears and/or brain.
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
    13. anonymoose

      anonymoose Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Neck injury
      I'm in a somewhat similar boat as you--check my post history for the thread I made about mine if you're interested.

      Long story short, I discovered the musculoskeletal nature of my tinnitus when I noticed that the frequency I couldn't hear would shift fairly dramatically day-to-day and sometimes hour-to-hour. One day I somewhat accidentally realized I could modulate this by moving through flexion (would completely cut off my ability to hear a frequency) through extension (would allow me to hear it perfectly well).

      Through tons of PT I've been either narrowing the issue or shifting it to other "weak points" so to speak. I'm currently in a place where neck flexion/extension doesn't do anything, but if I rotate my head to the extremes left or right at those extremes I experience tinnitus in the opposite side of the direction I turn (e.g. turning right makes my left ear ring). All I can assume at this point is that nerves are either irritated, overly stretched, or overly tight and those particular movements are putting some sort of stress on them that's resulting in tinnitus.

      The question is obviously: why doesn't everyone who turns there head left or right get tinnitus as a result? This is followed up by a question of: why am I suddenly sensitive to what happens to my nerves/tendons/muscles in a way that my ear rings (for me it's almost always my left ear except in very certain situations while laying down)? Tons of research makes me think there is a parasympathetic nervous system issue going on and maybe a little bit of neural plasticity. Some initial insult (in medical terms) causes the tinnitus, the brain learns the tinnitus, and then the parasympathetic nervous system makes me experience it more or be more sensitive to it.

      Coming back to your case, I find it strange that pressing on a nerve (or maybe it's the muscle) causes significant relief, which then reverts with a bit of a rebound (the EEEEeeee). As far as I can tell, pressing on a nerve (even fairly hard) isn't enough in most cases to cease or greatly inhibit the signal it's sending. This makes me wonder if maybe you're pressing on a muscle (and thus increasing the tension on it) or maybe even pressing on a vein (and cutting off the flow of blood) and that's what's changing the tinnitus loudness. I recently went 7-8 full days without any ringing and for the last few days have been anywhere from a 0-2 with simple neck stretches resulting in relief when it starts to get closer to a 2.

      There's a paper (easy to find if you search for it) of a man that had tinnitus for ~20 years who had complete resolution within a month or two with intermittent (e.g. 30 minutes a day, 2-3x a day) use of a soft cervical collar. For him they found certain neck postures (e.g. chin forward or backwards) that dramatically increased the volume of the tinnitus. I'd suggest looking up that paper and reading through it and working with a good physiatrist or PT to figure out what's going on structurally.

      In my personal experience, significant efforts in increasing neck mobility (through stretching of muscles/tendons) is what ultimately resulted in a dramatic decrease in my tinnitus loudness. It's still there, but now instead of being a 4-5/10 in loudness constantly, it's anywhere from a 0-3 with 0 being completely gone, 1 being only there when I plug my ear and listen for it, 2 being a general ringing, 3 being an actual ringing I can hear in the background, and 4-5-6-7-etc. being louder and louder ringing).
       
      • Like Like x 2
    14. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      AnthonyMcDonald
      Confused

      AnthonyMcDonald Member

      Location:
      Russia
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced/Neurological/Unknown
      Thank you for the detailed reply. Gave me a lot to think about.

      Are there any neck stretches / video in particular you would recommend?
       
    15. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      Read this:

      Upper Cervical Nerves Can Induce Tinnitus (alliedacademies.org)

      This is a remarkable treatment. Seen it done and bullseye, tinnitus is gone.

      Resolution of long standing tinnitus following radiofrequency ablation of C2-C3 medial branches--a case report - PubMed (nih.gov)
      Because of this, you shouldn't mess with neck until seeing a physical therapist, as other judgment needs to be made, including examination of posture (forward posture) and muscles.

      C3-4 cervical facet joints can radiate to the occipital area, frontotemporal and even periorbital regions.

      2ef9?rik=K07fjiHlBa%2fTww&riu=http%3a%2f%2fwww.medicalexhibits.com%2fobrasky%2f2010%2f10020_04XA.jpg
       
      • Agree Agree x 2
    16. anonymoose

      anonymoose Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Neck injury
      As the poster above me said, I’d recommend seeing a professional as your situation is almost assuredly at least a little different than mine.

      Definitely don’t want to accidentally make the tinnitus worse!
       
    17. Peter Q

      Peter Q Member

      Location:
      Ireland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2009
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      • Informative Informative x 1
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