June 2021: Vote on Your Favourite Research Paper!

Discussion in 'Research News' started by Hazel, Jul 25, 2021.

?

Which of the following research papers do you find most valuable?

  1. Bayesian inference and default mode balance determines tinnitus from decreased auditory input

  2. The Complex-Pole Filter Representation (COFRE) for spectral modeling of fNIRS signals

  3. Central processing in tinnitus: fMRI study outlining patterns of activation from auditory task

  4. Efficacy of digital hearing aids in management of tinnitus with sensorineural hearing loss

  5. A randomized, controlled trial of notched music therapy for tinnitus patients

  6. The relationship between tinnitus pitch, audiogram edge frequency, and auditory stream segregation

  7. The efficacy of acoustic therapy versus oral medication for chronic tinnitus: A meta-analysis

  8. A comparative study on photobiological effects of low-level laser and tinnitus retraining therapy

  9. Evidence of tinnitus development due to stress: an experimental study in rats

  10. Neuropsychological monitoring of current acoustic therapies as alternative tinnitus treatment

  11. Restoration of deafferentation reduces tinnitus, anxiety and depression in cochlear implant patients

  12. Long-term prognosis of tinnitus associated with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

Results are only viewable after voting.
    1. Hazel
      Dreaming

      Hazel Director Staff Podcast Patron Benefactor Hall of Fame Advocate

      Location:
      the Netherlands
      Tinnitus Since:
      10/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      one-sided hearing loss (of unknown origin)
      Okay, this will be the last voting round for 2021, so please take the opportunity to vote (once again) now!

      [NB: You need to be logged in to vote. Don't have an account? Signing up is easy, click here.]


      You can also still vote for January, February, March, April and May — we will keep all of these open for the next few weeks to gather as much voting data as possible.

      We know it takes a bit of time to read through and carefully consider what to vote for, but remember it's for a good cause! Once we analyze all the voting results and share them with the research community, we'll be sending a clear and loud signal about the kind of research the tinnitus community wants to see!

      INSTRUCTIONS: 1) Read the summaries below — especially created for you to help you digest these papers easily; and 2) select your favourite paper in the poll.

      A big shout out once again to @Frédéric and @Aaron91 for preparing the list and summaries!

      The reason this is the last 2021 round is because we want to take the time to analyze the voting data from the past six months and publish a report summarizing the voting results, which we can then share with the research community. We will also use insights from this analysis to come up with an even better voting system for 2022.

      Any data analysts out there who want to help with analyzing the voting data from the first half of 2021?!?

      Thanks for taking the time to vote!

      :thankyousign:

      Tinnitus Research Papers Published in June 2021

      1. The balance between Bayesian inference and default mode determines the generation of tinnitus from decreased auditory input: A volume entropy-based study
      This study used resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) to compare information flow to different parts of the brain. A comparison was made between those with peripheral hearing loss with tinnitus (HL-T) and those with peripheral hearing loss and no tinnitus (HL-NT). The results suggests that balance between the Baynesian inferential network (areas involved in updating missing auditory information) and the DMN (areas for maintaining “silent status quo”) determines whether a phantom sound occurs in a brain with peripheral hearing loss.

      2. The Complex-Pole Filter Representation (COFRE) for spectral modeling of fNIRS signals
      This study applies a new approach for spectrum modeling in biomedical signals (COFRE) to identify frequency markers in the brain that characterize tinnitus. Brain signals were measured with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), an emerging method detecting brain oxygenation levels. Data from six patients with subjective tinnitus and seven healthy participants were compared. A significant decrease in signal power was observed in tinnitus patients in the left temporal lobe. In particular, several tinnitus signatures related to spectral blood flow information were identified.

      3. Central Processing in Tinnitus: fMRI Study Outlining Patterns of Activation Using an Auditory Discrimination Task in Normal Versus Tinnitus Patients
      This study investigated brain activity differences between patients with subjective idiopathic tinnitus, patients with both tinnitus and hearing loss, and healthy controls, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Task performance and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory scores were recorded. The study found that it is possible to predict auditory task performance in patients with tinnitus by looking at the activity of specific regions of interest. More specifically, Heschl's gyrus, angular gyrus, cerebellar, and limbic system activity are important contributors to neurological activity associated with tinnitus.

      4. The Efficacy of Digital Hearing Aids in the Management of Tinnitus in Individuals with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
      The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three different types of hearing aids in the management of tinnitus. Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) scores were taken before and after treatment in 108 subjects. All three types of digital programmable hearing aids provided appreciable mitigation of tinnitus. Hearing aids with an inbuilt masker were found to give the best benefit.

      5. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Notched Music Therapy for Tinnitus Patients
      The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy between a tailor-made notched music therapy and ordinary music in tinnitus patients. A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted on 104 Thai patients with chronic subjective tinnitus who were assessed at 1, 3 and 6 months. The treatment group showed a greater reduction in Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and Visual Analog Scale scores than the control group during the follow-up period.

      6. The Relationship Between Tinnitus Pitch, Audiogram Edge Frequency, and Auditory Stream Segregation Abilities in Individuals With Tinnitus
      The aim of this study was to estimate the relationship between tinnitus pitch, audiogram edge frequency, and speech perception in noise. Some 13 individuals with bilateral mild-to-severe tonal tinnitus and minimal-to-mild cochlear hearing loss and 13 individuals with hearing loss without tinnitus were selected. The study found a high correlation between tinnitus pitch and audiogram edge frequency, i.e. the frequency at which hearing loss worsens relatively abruptly. Furthermore, speech perception in noise difficulties were higher for individuals with tinnitus, particularly at the frequency corresponding to tinnitus pitch.

      7. The efficacy of acoustic therapy versus oral medication for chronic tinnitus: A meta-analysis
      The aim of this meta-analysis study was to compare the efficacy of acoustic therapy (AT) and drug therapy (DT) for chronic tinnitus. A total of 18 studies across 1,774 patients (926 treated with AT and 812 treated with DT) were compared. Compared with DT, AT can significantly improve the efficacy of tinnitus and reduce the symptoms of tinnitus patients. Clinically, it can vigorously promote the application value of treating tinnitus by sound.

      8. A comparative study on photobiological effects of low-level laser therapy and tinnitus retraining therapy in patients with acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus
      This study investigated the photobiological effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) in patients with acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus. Some 60 patients suffering from acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus for more than six months were divided into three groups of LLLT, TRT and LLLT + TRT. The Persian version of tinnitus handicap inventory (P-THI), visual analog scale (VAS), and loudness match (LM) scale were used to collect data. The study recommended the use of LLLT plus TRT as a therapeutic protocol, citing remarkable effects in reducing acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus symptoms. The use of LLLT method alone, however, was not recommended due to its lower effects.

      9. Evidence of Tinnitus Development Due to Stress: An Experimental Study in Rats
      The aim of this study was to investigate stress as a possible causal factor in the development of tinnitus in an animal study. Wistar rats were divided according to single or double exposure to noise and restraint stress. Tinnitus appeared to develop after stress alone and the study concluded that an imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the hippocampus may be related to the development of tinnitus after acute noise exposure and/or stress.

      10. Neuropsychological monitoring of current acoustic therapies as alternative treatment of chronic tinnitus
      This study compared sound therapies based on music, retraining, neuromodulation, and binaural sounds through neuro-audiology assessments and psychological evaluations in 76 volunteers with tinnitus for 60 days. The neuro-audiology assessment revealed that the whole frequency structure of the neural networks showed a higher level of activeness in tinnitus sufferers than in control individuals. The psychological evaluation showed that retraining treatment tended to be the most effective sound-based therapy to reduce tinnitus perception, but it may be not recommended for individuals with anxiety. Binaural sounds and neuromodulation produced very similar effects at reducing tinnitus perception, stress and anxiety. Music treatments should be applied with caution since they may worsen the condition due to their frequency content.

      11. Restoration of Deafferentation Reduces Tinnitus, Anxiety, and Depression: A Retrospective Study on Cochlear Implant Patients

      This retrospective study investigated the effect of cochlear implants (CIs) on tinnitus distress and psychological comorbidities in patients with profound bilateral deafness. Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Visual Analog Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Questionnaire, Categories of Auditory Performance and Speech Intelligibility scores were measured in 51 patients before and after CI implantation. Cochlear implantation showed positive therapeutic effects on tinnitus and psychological comorbidities, including tinnitus severity, better hearing, depression and anxiety.

      12. Long-Term Prognosis of Tinnitus Associated with Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss
      The aim of this study was to analyze the factors affecting the long-term prognosis of tinnitus accompanied by unilateral idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL). A total of 161 patients with sudden hearing loss accompanied by tinnitus were enrolled. The study found that tinnitus after SSNHL has a tendency of self-recovery and that the short-term prognosis of tinnitus may be related to psychological changes caused by hearing recovery, while the long-term prognosis of residual tinnitus after SSNHL is related only to the initial tinnitus level, with a median recovery time of approximately 2 years.
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Winner Winner x 1
    2. Damocles
      Spooky

      Damocles Member Benefactor

      Location:
      England
      Tinnitus Since:
      2009
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear Infection
      Found it quite difficult to make a decision.

      Any chance we could change it to voting for our least favourite research paper? Because that would make it much easier, given there's an obvious choice, nestled... somewhere... in there... :LOL:
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • Funny Funny x 1
    3. Nobody19

      Nobody19 Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Clubbing
      What exactly do you need? I've had stats in school but admittedly it's been a while since I've used any of it.
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Agree Agree x 1
    4. Damocles
      Spooky

      Damocles Member Benefactor

      Location:
      England
      Tinnitus Since:
      2009
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear Infection
      You're alright. I was struggling to choose between 2 and 7, but resolved to give 2 my vote because I feel that ultimately, once science fully understand tinnitus's existence inside of the brain, it'll have pretty much solved the puzzle regarding a generic (OSFA) treatment.

      Thank you though, and thank you @Hazel!
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Agree Agree x 1
    5. Nobody19

      Nobody19 Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Clubbing
      I was actually talking about Hazel's request for data analysts. :D
       
      • Funny Funny x 2
    6. Nobody19

      Nobody19 Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Clubbing
      I can't decide between 1-3. They're all the kind of research we need (what causes tinnitus).
       
      • Like Like x 1
    7. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Hazel
      Dreaming

      Hazel Director Staff Podcast Patron Benefactor Hall of Fame Advocate

      Location:
      the Netherlands
      Tinnitus Since:
      10/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      one-sided hearing loss (of unknown origin)
      Thanks for asking! So we now have polling data from the past 6 months, and the question is how do we glean meaningful insights from this?

      If we're going to share the results with researchers, in the hope that they will take note and direct their research efforts in directions we like, then we have to show them a persuasive analysis demonstrating what the tinnitus community wants.

      How we should accomplish this, I'm not sure, but once we have a working group in place I'm sure we can figure out together how to go about it...
       
      • Like Like x 2
    8. nyjag

      nyjag Member

      Location:
      FL
      Tinnitus Since:
      24/7 since 12/2015, intermittent prior
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      24/7 T, large cal shooting (with double ear protection!)
      I accept that I have it. It's been a part of my daily life since 2013. I am at peace with and no longer worry about it. Sure, I need to trick it to fall asleep (which led me to the wonderful world of podcasts). But to be honest, if it were to suddenly move on, I think I would miss my noisy headmate.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    9. rllavane

      rllavane Member

      Location:
      San Antonio de los Altos, Miranda, Venezuela
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2006
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Must have been a firework that exploded close to the ears
      Hello all of you.
      I have been suffering from Tinnitus for almost 20 years and for me, treating it holistically has been a solution that has allowed me to cope with that silent annoyance. Exercise and concentration and especially the practice of TAICHI.
      I have tried music therapy treatments and they are quite beneficial and help a lot to cope - not diminish - the sounds of Tinnitus.
      Studies 4, 5, 7 and 9 are very good. I discard the 4 because I have never used hearing aids although I think that in the future I will have to.
      In this way, the most complete study is the one with the most volunteers to compare. In this way, I think Study 7 of The Efficacy of Acoustic Therapy Versus Oral Medication for Chronic Tinnitus: A Meta-Analysis is significantly the best IMHO.
      Rafael Llavaneras
      Caracas Venezuela
       
    10. nyjag

      nyjag Member

      Location:
      FL
      Tinnitus Since:
      24/7 since 12/2015, intermittent prior
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      24/7 T, large cal shooting (with double ear protection!)
      I picked 4 by the way. I'm close to 60, mom and pop both have hearing aids, my wife is now constantly reminding me I "talk too loud", and I watch tele w/ captions to not miss dialogue (except w/ sports). I never use captions w/sports.
       
    11. Leo Phillips

      Leo Phillips Member

      Location:
      Vermont
      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Head trauma
      Rather than a researcher down approach I think a patient centered compilation of issues and goals presented to researchers would be more effective. The vast majority of individuals do not have the educational background to understand these different methodologies, let alone make an informed educated choice.

      Not only does your average tinnitus sufferer not have the background to comprehend these papers, in many cases they are additionally burdened depending on one's symptoms and ability to manage them, often for multi year periods, making the task of reading anything, let alone scientific research in which they have little to no training a daunting or impossible task.

      I'd suggest looking to the LDA - Lyme Disease Association for a template on how to better serve a long suffering population.
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    12. nyjag

      nyjag Member

      Location:
      FL
      Tinnitus Since:
      24/7 since 12/2015, intermittent prior
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      24/7 T, large cal shooting (with double ear protection!)
      I have tinnitus due to damaged/lost cilia in my inner ear and can pinpoint when and how it occurred. When the technology exists for (successful) cilia replacement surgery, I will volunteer myself to Guinea pig the procedure. Until then... see above.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    13. David J
      Confused

      David J Member

      Location:
      Kent, Ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      I find No. 2 to be the most important and relevant to those of us without significant hearing loss and no suspected identifiable event of probable cause. Besides, as pointed-out in another comment, it is most important in attempting to identify a physiological cause.
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    14. Lance Marafiote

      Lance Marafiote Member

      Location:
      34606
      Tinnitus Since:
      1986
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic and operation
      I find some of the studies seem to: Overlap; (superficially) mask the issue; (intrinsically) correct the issue; offer coping mechanisms; or, eventually lead to correcting cause(s).
      Either way, I find this educational - helping me to better understand what others are going through based on what each these studies focus on. Thanks @Hazel
       
      • Friendly Friendly x 1
    15. PatrizX
      Terrified

      PatrizX Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      9/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Brain Injury/Spinal Cord Compression and Injury/Nerve Damage
      Many interesting papers. COFRE paper (#2) would help identify where tinnitus is coming from, and perhaps, lead to more scientific breakthroughs in determining origin to address the devastating problem. My tinnitus is trauma-induced, and is constant since my accident with head and neck trauma. I have high-pitched constant loud tinnitus, which sounds like a transformer ready to blow up. It has wrecked my sanity and life, among other injuries. I also found #8 paper regarding LLLT and TRT to be valuable for trauma patients and tinnitus, like myself. I can only take one day at a time, and hope that new research can find applicable treatments for something so mentally torturing.
      Most valuable: 2. The Complex-Pole Filter Representation (COFRE) for spectral modeling of fNIRS signals.
      Runner up: 8. A comparative study on photobiological effects of low-level laser therapy and tinnitus retraining therapy in patients with acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus
       
      • Hug Hug x 1
      • Useful Useful x 1
    16. Nobody19

      Nobody19 Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Clubbing
      I ended up voting for 1. Close runner ups were 2 and 3.
       
    17. Johan001

      Johan001 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Medication
      I voted #2, as it's something that is close to the "real" research, as in finding the cause.

      Number #9 is just, wow! Are these guys for real? Traumatizing poor animals to give ENTs another "evidence" to say: "oh, you're just stressed, go watch some telly to chill out and your ringing will go away".
       
    18. Another Howard

      Another Howard Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1950
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Among those choices, the neuropsychological appeals most. However... I cannot ever forget that an "alternative" practitioner - the UK cranial-sacral osteopath Richard Holding - switched off my persistent whistle with one gentle pressure on my lower back. Silence after 25 years!
      I'm keen on science and asked if he could switch it on again.
      As a healing professional he was a bit reluctant, but did just that. 'All right?' he asked with a smile. Then switched off the whistle again with another gentle press. It stayed away for decades. I'm 77 now, and very little troubled by it.
      Such an intervention is not entirely unknown, and I really think our clever medical technologists should explore that avenue, including the successes of acupuncture in sharpening up the ever-helpful cognition.
      By all means brain-scan etc while these things are being done. It's easy, I appreciate, to dismiss them out of hand.
       
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    19. Jennifer Tucker
      Dancing

      Jennifer Tucker Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      I’m not sure but it might be a skiing accident
      They are all extremely helpful but my fav is the last 18.
       
    20. KMM154

      KMM154 Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Made more pronounced by Otitis Media and 3 grommet surgerie
      To be honest choices were difficult but opted for music therapy as a lover of music. I've basically learned to live with my tinnitus which is currently worse in my left ear, as I am virtually deaf in that ear due to glue ear (awaiting surgery). Most days I do not think of my tinnitus, some days it is worse, if unwell or tired. My hearing overall is quite poor and thinking of getting hearing aid, after surgery. Is it genetic?
       
    21. midwestin

      midwestin Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      October 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Infection or unknown
      1-3 were all important, I think. I chose 3 because it is closest to my personal opinion of what is lacking, which is an understanding of the diversity of tinnitus experience, cause and effect, and understanding of how external stimulation impacts it.

      Too many actual doctors respond to this condition with a standardized "there is no cause for tinnitus, and no cure. see you later." If we can establish that there are a variety of tinnitus experiences, that external factors actually can influence it, and understand how that all works in the brain, then we can start to actually analyze this condition instead of dismissing it as a mystery and a lost cause.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    22. oldschool

      oldschool Member

      There will be no cure until we understand the cause(s). Therefore, my true vote is to expand the resources understanding exactly what is causing it.

      On a separate note, I believe from a previous email that there is a new medication to help with tinnitus? But, I have heard little more. It would be interesting to get a poll from those taking this medication to see how much it is helping.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    23. Nobody19

      Nobody19 Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Clubbing
      Let me know if you think I can help. Like I said, I had some courses in stats, but I never used it after school. Don't shoot me if I end up not being that helpful :D
       
      • Like Like x 1
    24. Alfredo

      Alfredo Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      7/2011
      I vote #2.
       
Loading...

Share This Page