Loud Roaring Sound on Shutting Ear Canal: A Rare Type of Autophony/Hyperacusis?

Discussion in 'Support' started by EricZ, Sep 13, 2019.

    1. EricZ

      EricZ Member

      Location:
      The Netherlands
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/1993
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      loud music
      I have had hyperacusis for a very long time due to overexposure to loud music. My hearing is good. I do not have a greatly reduced dynamic range; it is mostly sounds from 80 to 90 decibels upwards that sound too loud and/or distorted. However, there is also an enhanced occlusion effect that occurs when I shut the ear canal with my fingers. The low-frequency sound transmitted by the muscle fibres of the arms that is only faintly audible under normal conditions is amplified considerably in my case (becoming very loud when I clench my fist or shut my eyes tight). The Ents I have seen could not account for this abnormal occlusion effect.

      I do not have (other kinds of) autophony; my voice, breathing etc sound perfectly normal. Nor do I have any of the symptoms associated with TTTS, apart from an occasionally fluttering eardrum (in reaction to sound). However, the tensor tympani muscle has sounded distinctly louder when contracting since I have had hyperacusis. I was wondering if there is anyone else familiar with this...
       
    2. Juan

      Juan Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Several causes
      Those are all starting symptoms of hyperacusis. It is mild hyperacusis maybe, so you can probably function normally and carry a normal life.
       
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      EricZ

      EricZ Member

      Location:
      The Netherlands
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/1993
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      loud music
      Hi Juan,

      Thanks for your reply.

      I am not sure whether you mean you have also experienced this abnormal occlusion effect?

      I am wondering what it says about the mechanism underlying my hyperacusis (and whether sound therapy or surgery might be worth considering). I tried sound therapy a long time ago but it did not work for me, although maybe I should have stuck with it longer. I may not have severe hyperacusis, but loud sounds are still extremely uncomfortable. It has definitely had a big impact on my daily life, since I tend to shun noisy places for fear of my hyperacusis worsening.

      Unfortunately, I have never come across a description of this enhanced occlusion effect in any scientific article on hyperacusis. It has occurred consistently for over 20 years and has never fluctuated in the slightest.
       
      • Hug Hug x 1

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