Pulsatile Tinnitus Caused by Bone Erosion?

Discussion in 'Support' started by Theres, Jul 15, 2016.

    1. Theres

      Theres Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Hi all. I've been lurking here since my pulsatile tinnitus (unilateral, right side) showed up in November 2015. My symptoms started in conjunction with a sinus infection, but I'm not sure if this is a coincidence or not. After taking antibiotics for the infection, the noise has decreased somewhat in volume, but is still there. If I tilt my head to the opposite side as the noise, it goes quiet, if I press on my vein, quiet. Sometimes if I blow my nose (accompanied by plenty of ear crackling) and leave the pressure in my ear (i.e. don't move my jaw or swallow. I hope that makes sense), the noise is gone. If I bend over or stand up quickly, there's a surge in the whooshing for a split second, then it goes back to normal whooshing. I also feel a slight pressure/full sensation in my affected ear as well.

      Since then I've had an MRI with contrast, CT scan, and ultrasound of the neck. Nothing of note to report except I have a slight erosion of the bone that sits between my vein and ear, which the radiologist suggested might be the cause of my pulsatile tinnitus. She's going to have a closer look at all my scans and send an official report to my ENT, who I will see on Thursday.

      I'm still trying to wrap my head around all this as well as the possibility of having to live with this incessant noise for the rest of my life. Have any of you come across studies/information having to do with bone erosion and pulsatile tinnitus? Also, I know many of you have been living with this sound for a long time, any helpful advice on how to stay sane? I just get so frustrated sometimes when the room goes quiet and the whooshing sound seems even more oppressive than usual.
       
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    2. glynis
      Feminine

      glynis Member Benefactor Hall of Fame Ambassador Team Awareness

      Location:
      England, Stoke-on-Trent
      Tinnitus Since:
      2004
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Meniere's Disease
      Hi Theres,
      Try not to worry about the results and I'm sure if anything can be done you will be given options as to what can be done.
      In the mean time if you need to keep sound on around you day or night to help you then you can download a few free apps.
      Try to remain calm so you don't get stressed or anxiety that can make tinnitus worse.
      A lady comes to the tinnitus group myself and another lady run who has pulsitile tinnitus and find hearing aids help her and a small betablocker so you have options if it gets to much.

      With tinnitus comes unwanted emotions so if low moods become a problem see your doctor for support and for anxiety.....lots of love glynis
       
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    3. The Red Viper
      Curious

      The Red Viper Member

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      March 15, 2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Current Theory: Neck injury (Tendonitis @ trap/SCM junction)
      OMG I have exactly this in addition to my regular T. Good to know. I've only had a contrast MRI but perhaps it's time to get a CT to check for bone issues.
       
    4. flypby

      flypby Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      pulsatile
      My Wife has the same issue. The 2nd ENT we found looked at the head and neck scan and found that her vein/artery(Not sure) was pushing the bones close to her right ear. We are going to Neurologist later. Please let us know how your case went. Thank you.
       
    5. Theres

      Theres Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Just wanted to give an update on my condition as it's been over a year since my pulsatile tinnitus started. My ENT still has no idea what is causing the condition as everything looks normal, apart from the bone erosion and apparently my jugular bulb is a bit higher than normal (my radiologist said this is just an anatomical abnormality that happens in a small percentage of people and she didn't think it had anything to do with my PT as it's not protruding into the surrounding structures). Since my last appointment with my ENT I've been working on physical therapy exercises for my neck because I am almost certain my problem is caused by some kind of impingement. I have a few knots in the sternocleidomastoid muscle on the side of my affected ear (that's the muscle that runs from underneath the ear to the collar bone), so I've been gently massaging that area as well as doing some exercises geared toward improving the position of my neck, jaw, and posture. The PT has gotten much better. I have minutes where I don't hear the noise at all, and now, when I do hear it, the volume is greatly decreased. I'm going to continue with the exercises and massage and if it continues to help, I plan on writing a different post detailing the exercises and sources I used. I hope this helps anyone who happens to stumble across this post.
       
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    6. Kelvin

      Kelvin Member Benefactor

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      June 2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Dental Work
      @Theres Would be good to know what exercises help when you have a minute. Mine started after Dental work and I am convinced it created ( or exacerbated ) an existing problem in my jaw / neck. I have had a lifetime of neck and shoulder stiffness that at times made my jaw stiff. Wishing you a continued recovery and more peace !
       
    7. Theres

      Theres Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      https://breakingmuscle.com/learn/heal-your-tmj-disorder-with-3-simple-posture-exercises

      I started out with the exercises found in the link above. These help with posture and alignment, but they will also help with jaw and neck issues. I do these exercises once a day (it takes about 5 minutes). I also do an exercise where I push my lower jaw forward so that my upper and lower teeth (the central incisors) are stacked on top of each other, then I slowly open my mouth and close it so that the line between the incisors follow the same vertical path (I use the edge of a comb for reference). I hope that makes sense. I do this exercise two times a day, 20 repetitions. I also massage the sternocleidomastoid muscle. You can look up a few videos online on how to do this safely.

      I hope this helps! At the very least, maybe it will give you some ideas on where else to look for relief.
       

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