Question for the Ladies...

Discussion in 'Support' started by Amelia, Mar 7, 2014.

tinnitus forum
    1. Amelia
      Daring

      Amelia Member

      Location:
      Australia
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2013
      Just wondering if your T spikes/changes in relation to your menstral cycle?

      I'm trying to work out if mine is/seems worse at certain times of the month or if it's only due to hormones As I'm just less able to deal with it as I'm more emotional.
       
    2. Amelia
      Daring

      Amelia Member

      Location:
      Australia
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2013
      * I should add all you blokes are welcome to chime in if you know anything about a relation to hormones and T :)
       
    3. Stina
      Psychedelic

      Stina Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Tartu
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/13
      Mine doesn't but I suppose it depends on the person:) Also probably on the hormones produced..
       
    4. citigirl13
      Dreaming

      citigirl13 Member

      Location:
      North Yorkshire, England
      Tinnitus Since:
      17/1/14
      T can change due to hormones. In fact there is a like between the pill and t, and when people stop taking it the t usually disappears. I'm not sure whether it changes due to the me steal cycle. I haven't noticed anyway
       
    5. Amelia
      Daring

      Amelia Member

      Location:
      Australia
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2013
      I'm not in the pill so I assume my hormone changes might be a little more severe?
       
    6. Stina
      Psychedelic

      Stina Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Tartu
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/13
      I think the pill is the reason why hormonal production changes. So if you are not on the pill, there are probably no hormonal changes in the larger sense. Sure the hormones produced in the body change during the cycle but I dont think its always has to be very strong. For example some women get PMS while others don't, which shows that everyone is very different. Therefore you can only rely on your own experience:)
       
    7. Lisa88

      Lisa88 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      Yes. Hormones and inflammation can play a big part in spiking t.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    8. S.withnell
      Sleepy

      S.withnell Member

      Location:
      Lancashire England
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Sorry to bring up an old topic but yes I think mine has been due to the time of the month setup , but I'm on implant and ive never had issues before but now my implant is due out any time soon my time of the month has been all over and ive noticed my t is far higher and louder than ever when this happens, on,y twice so far but I do feel it's some how linked.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    9. jazz
      No Mood

      jazz Member Benefactor

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      8/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      eardrum rupture from virus; barotrauma from ETD
      Agreed.

      To date, no one has studied tinnitus and the menstrual cycle, but it only makes sense given estrogen's role in audition. Estrogen also affects pain perception, and, as we know, tinnitus and pain follow similar neural pathways.


      Front Neuroendocrinol. 2013 Oct;34(4):329-49. doi: 10.1016/j.yfrne.2013.06.001. Epub 2013 Jun 29.
      Estrogenic influences in pain processing.
      Amandusson Å1, Blomqvist A.
      Author information
      Abstract

      Gonadal hormones not only play a pivotal role in reproductive behavior and sexual differentiation, they also contribute to thermoregulation, feeding, memory, neuronal survival, and the perception of somatosensory stimuli. Numerous studies on both animals and human subjects have also demonstrated the potential effects of gonadal hormones, such as estrogens, on pain transmission. These effects most likely involve multiple neuroanatomical circuits as well as diverse neurochemical systems and they therefore need to be evaluated specifically to determine the localization and intrinsic characteristics of the neurons engaged. The aim of this review is to summarize the morphological as well as biochemical evidence in support for gonadal hormone modulation of nociceptive processing, with particular focus on estrogens and spinal cord mechanisms.

      Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


      Curr Opin Neurol. 2014 Jun;27(3):315-24. doi: 10.1097/WCO.0000000000000091.
      Migraine and estrogen.
      Chai NC1, Peterlin BL, Calhoun AH.
      Author information
      Abstract

      PURPOSE OF REVIEW:
      The aim is to systematically and critically review the relationship between migraine and estrogen, the predominant female sex hormone, with a focus on studies published in the last 18 months.

      RECENT FINDINGS:
      Recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies of the brain support the existence of anatomical and functional differences between men and women, as well as between participants with migraine and healthy controls. In addition to the naturally occurring changes in endogenous sex hormones over the lifespan (e.g. puberty and menopause), exogenous sex hormones (e.g. hormonal contraception or hormone therapy) also may modulate migraine. Recent data support the historical view of an elevated risk of migraine with significant drops in estrogen levels. In addition, several lines of research support that reducing the magnitude of decline in estrogen concentrations prevents menstrually related migraine (MRM) and migraine aura frequency.

      SUMMARY:
      Current literature has consistently demonstrated that headache, in particular migraine, is more prevalent in women as compared with men, specifically during reproductive years. Recent studies have found differences in headache characteristics, central nervous system anatomy, as well as functional activation by fMRI between the sexes in migraine patients. Although the cause underlying these differences is likely multifactorial, considerable evidence supports an important role for sex hormones. Recent studies continue to support that MRM is precipitated by drops in estrogen concentrations, and minimizing this decline may prevent these headaches. Limited data also suggest that specific regimens of combined hormone contraceptive use in MRM and migraine with aura may decrease both headache frequency and aura.

      References:

       
      • Informative Informative x 2
    10. derpytia
      Pooptoast

      derpytia Member

      Location:
      Rescue, California
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Hearing loss / ETD
      My T goes on a spike the week before and the week of my menstrual cycle. So really I only get two weeks a month of some kind of peace before 2 weeks of loud T.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    11. patty

      patty Member Benefactor

      Location:
      New York
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      Yes, I've noticed a link. Hormones going crazy and all, little more anxious, and yes it spikes some. But not to worry, it will level off.
       
    12. Miss lavender

      Miss lavender Member

      Location:
      Australia
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/01/2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Virus
      Yes, I find the week I have my period my tinnitus becomes more high pitched and bothersome. It then goes back to baseline, however during ovulation it's even quieter. Go figure, tinnitus has its own mind.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1

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