Safety of Producing Music at Low Levels Circa 60-70 dB for Someone with Tinnitus?

Discussion in 'Support' started by Pink Noise, Jan 18, 2020.

    1. Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      Is it ok to continue producing music with tinnitus if done at low levels circa 60 dB?

      I don't use headphones anymore. I think that's what caused my tinnitus in the first place :(

      Just wondering if damage to the hearing system (brain included, cochlea etc) is caused by critical listening?

      My tinnitus just keeps getting worse - I'm 4 months in. I went to a British Tinnitus Association meet up, fellow sufferers and audiologist advised at that level no damage should occur. I'm trying to carry on with my life doing what I love but worried that I'm causing further damage. I think I have a bit of dysacusis too. Sound sounds slightly distorted like a whirly tube:

      Sound Hose - Whirly Tube

      ^^^ Remember these.

      This has only started to occur this week. I have only spent about 10 hours in the studio over the whole week.
       
    2. MidnightOilAudio
      Ape-like

      MidnightOilAudio Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2015
      Let me start this post with the usual caveat that everyone is different. For those with moderate to severe hyperacusis, even those low levels will be troublesome.

      ive continued to record and mix music for 5 years with no increase to my T. I just protect my ears when I need to and mix at appropriately low levels. Mixing at low levels will probably improve your productions/mixes anyway, to be honest.
       
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    3. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      The first time you try, do it for a short time (5 minutes?). If there is no spike, increase your exposure the next time and keep gradually increasing it.
       
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    4. Jeebs
      Depressed

      Jeebs Member

      Location:
      Germany
      Tinnitus Since:
      10/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise Induced
      I have experienced your "whirling" sound as well as some morse-code like beeping over speech and certain frequencies (especially electrical buzz and certain fans) since last week following a faculty party that was a bit on the louder side (maybe comparable to a full dive bar?). Now for different reasons I am housebound and the quiet environment is helping improving these issues day by day. You may experience a mild hyperacusis reacting to loud noise exposure. I think key here is readjusting your hearing to normal sound levels. By your avatar, you are fairly new to the world of T, just like I am. @Michael Leigh pointed out that it may take a year or a bit longer for your auditory system to fully heal, if your tinnitus is noise-induced.

      I don't believe 60dB, even over longer periods of time, will cause damage to your inner ear, I recall 85dB being considered safe even for prolonged times. However, it may spike your tinnitus, so you should be wary about that just like @Bill Bauer adviced.

      Best of luck that your T will improve!
       
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    5. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      Thanks so much guys. You are all awesome. My T keeps changinging an only I can hear it but having a community really helps. This morning feels a scrap better.

      I will try in 5 minute chunks as Bill mentioned.

      I'm wondering if it's the type of music I make which relies heavily on distortion/ clipping / limiting to make the sound.


      I hope all of us improve... I really do.
       
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    6. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      @Pink Noise @Jeebs

      The both of you are a new to Noise induced tinnitus and probably have hyperacusis too, as this often accompanies the condition. Although each person's experience of it will be unique, there are similarities to the way it affects a person's mental and emotional wellbeing. This type of tinnitus can take up to two years to heal and some people may require treatment with a Hearing Therapist or Audiologist that specialises in Tinnitus and Hyperacusis treatment and management.

      @Pink Noise
      Since you live in the UK, I advise you not to pursue any private treatment for your tinnitus as you will get the best help and long term aftercare under the NHS. I am mentioning this so that you do not waste money going down the private healthcare route for tinnitus. If you haven't been referred to ENT yet via your GP, then I suggest you make an appointment. If your hearing tests and MRI show no abnormalities, and you still find the tinnitus and oversensitivity to sound problematic, you are likely to be referred Audiology to see a Hearing Therapist or Audiologist that specialises in tinnitus and hyperacusis treatment.

      I advise the both of you not to be tempted and try any treatment for tinnitus that uses audio played through headphones.

      Pink Noise, you need to give your ears a rest and if possible stop producing music for a while. Sound levels of 40 decibels and below through speakers can spike and aggravate tinnitus & hyperacusis in some people, especially in the early weeks and months that they are new to these conditions. I am an Audiophile and was unable to listen to my system at 30 decibels as the tinnitus and hyperacusis spiked. I didn't listen to my HI-FI for one year. I am not say the same will apply to you. However, I am saying a person that is new to Noise induced tinnitus may have to give their ears a rest from certain sounds, if they find their ears and auditory system become irritated.

      Please click on the links below and read my articles that you might find helpful. Take your time and read them thoroughly and without skimming.

      All the best
      Michael

      PS: I strongly advise you do not use headphones even at low volume.

      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/new-to-tinnitus-what-to-do.12558/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/tinnitus-a-personal-view.18668/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/hyperacusis-as-i-see-it.19174/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/acquiring-a-positive-mindset.23969/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/tinnitus-and-the-negative-mindset.23705/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/the-habituation-process.20767/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/is-positivity-important.23150/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/habituation-and-tinnitus-treatments.38091/
       
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    7. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      Hi @Michael Leigh,

      I have read through your threads multiple times over the last 4 months and digested the info. I found it really useful and comforting especially in the first few months. Thanks for providing the community with this info, it's a very charitable thing to do might I add. Thank you.:thankyousign:

      I have seen ENT and I do have some mild hearing loss in one ear but he said he isn't concerned at all as it still quite normal for a 37 year old. Having the MRI scan 1st of Feb, hoping that is all clear and then after that he said that I will be referred to an Audiologist who specialises in tinnitus as you mentioned.

      I'm gonna struggle to not produce as it's my business that I have built up, hence livelihood at the moment. I'm going to try a few short spells of may be 50 dB or lower. My room is quiet and acoustically treated which helps with keeping volume low. My best stuff is done at lower volume levels anyway due to the Fletcher Munson effect.

      I have a couple of releases that are about to go out to hopefully generate some more revenue. I can take a break after that as I will be promoting. Fortunately I don't have to DJ.

      I tried sleep phones initially with violet noise at low levels, but I think headphones have caused more problems than it tried to solve. So now I use pillow speakers at a very low level with pink noise and it seems to help with sleep.

      No more headphones. I use Focal SM9s so I don't think I'm missing out lol.;)
       
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    8. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      @Pink Noise

      Thank you for your kind words. I realize music is your business and livelihood so my advice is just to be careful on what you decide to do regarding exposure to sound. Please be under no illusion of what I am about to say. It is not to frighten but hopefully help you so that your tinnitus and hyperacusis do not become worse.

      Noise induced tinnitus can be seriously debilitating if it is not treated with respect. You wouldn't believe the impact that it can have on a person's mental and emotional wellbeing. I do as I have been through it and know the depths that it can take a person too. Therefore, I advise you not to listen to any ENT doctor that tells you that listening to music through headphones a low volume will do no harm. It is true some people with NIT are not affected by headphone use but many people with this condition are.

      Furthermore, ENT doctors are physicians they are not tinnitus specialists or experts. Most (but not all) know very little about tinnitus, as this is not their area of expertise. ENT doctors do not treat tinnitus, they treat underlying medical conditions within the auditory system that is causing it. This is the reason I said to you, if your tests at ENT show no abnormalities and the tinnitus is still problematic, you are likely to be referred to Audiology to see a Hearing Therapist or Audiologist that specialises in Tinnitus and hyperacusis treatments and management. In short, they treat Noise induce tinnitus, chiefly in the way if affects a person's mental and emotional wellbeing. This can include: sound therapy, counselling or medication. Sometimes a combination of these treatments are used.

      Best of luck
      Michael
       
    9. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      Thanks @Michael Leigh,

      I wish I had read your posts before I bought the sleep phones early on. I watched some YouTube vids on T and they advised to stay off the forums due to negativity, so I did. Watched some of Julians Cowell Hill's vids which helped when I was in a dark place, but left the therapy side of things as I'm not convinced. Bought sleep phones, went on TT and found that the very treatment I was trying was potentially making things worse. So I ditched them 3 months back.

      Cheers for all your support guys as its hard to deal with.
       
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    10. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      @Pink Noise

      Give it time and things will improve. If you are referred to Audiology and start any form of tinnitus treatment, I advise you to keep away from all tinnitus forums because of negativity. I am not referring to people that have a negative reaction to the way tinnitus makes them feel, but rather to people that denounce any form of tinnitus treatment being able to help the condition. This can be very damaging to those new to tinnitus and seeking help as they can easily be influenced by negative thinking people. Therefore, they may find habituating to tinnitus difficult or not achievable.

      If you are able to focus on reading positive posts this can be helpful. Try to engage in positive things that you like doing in order for your mental and emotional wellbeing to improve and also for your auditory system to heal. It will take time so be patient.

      Michael
       
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    11. HeavyMantra
      Bugridden

      HeavyMantra Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      What monitors are you using?
       
    12. AfroSnowman
      Balanced

      AfroSnowman Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 16 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      trauma
      Just a thought in case no one else has said it, tinnitus is famously variable in the beginning, so a different sound or change in tone is to be expected.
       
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    13. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      Focal SM9s - Mains
      Yamaha NS10S - HiFI reference
      Triple P Pyramids - Grot box speaker :wacky:
       
    14. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      But have you found it settles down though?

      I found a technique when mixing . I double check every change I would make on instinct as the same passage may not sound the same due to tinnitus / hyperacusis. It's still difficult though and slows me down.
       
    15. AfroSnowman
      Balanced

      AfroSnowman Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 16 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      trauma
      Yes but I think it may have as much to do with habituation as settling down. I think the most disturbing part for me was having audible illusions, I couldn’t really tell if what I was hearing was real or in my head. As I become habituated I have become so familiar with the noises and how they present themselves I understand instinctively what’s real and what’s in my head.

      I can have a hiss, static, electric crackles, or crickets. Occasionally I’ll have a passing weird sound not within the big four but I’ve become super familiar with them all

      So I don’t know how much this answer helps but I think as time goes on if you don’t get better you will become an expert at distinguishing your tinnitus from other sounds. Also I had hyperacusis for about my first four months and it got better, make sure you don’t become so protective that you make things worse

      Peace brother. Take your time, you’ll get your normal life back. It just takes a while
       
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    16. AfroSnowman
      Balanced

      AfroSnowman Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 16 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      trauma
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    17. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      Thanks @AfroSnowman - I do a lot of A/B testing when mixing and mastering. If commercial stuff released and my own stuff prior to the onset has weird artifacts then I can decipher what is real and illusionary. I also have producer friends who check my work even before the onset. They actually said that having tinnitus has made me more particular with my mixing and mastering working at low volumes, but I think I have just got better at the craft.

      I've read about over protection and sensitivity - I really don't fancy the problems that occur with that at all.
       
    18. Ross McLauchlan

      Ross McLauchlan Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      16/04/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise Induced due to music production and motorbikes.
      @Pink Noise

      I've had noise induced tinnitus for about three years, likely due to headphones. I still record and mix music daily and have done so since the start. I have a decent set of monitors and don't crank them up past 70db often, unless I need to for a particular purpose. I don't use earplugs or anything like that, in general, I just avoid headphones usage; therefore, recording vocals and acoustic instruments tends to take a back seat as I'd have track them with headphones on, which isn't worth it in my opinion.

      Take it in small steps, see how you go. I do a few hours at a time and I've never had a spike from home production at lower volumes - if anything, my mixing quality is better now than when my ears were being blasted.

      As its quite early on for you, just listen to your body and take a break when you need to. I'm in a position where I rarely wonder about damaging my ears due to production volume but that took some time, patience and not overstretching my ears. Continuing to make music is a form of sound therapy to me, I'm glad I kept pushing myself to keep chipping away.

      Take care.
       
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    19. HeavyMantra
      Bugridden

      HeavyMantra Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I would seriously reconsider getting the MRI. If you do, make sure it's a silent variety and use earplugs and earmuffs too.

      Many people on the forum had their tinnitus get permanently worse from an MRI.
       
    20. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      This is really positive stuff. Thank you for sharing that with me.
       
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    21. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      I will give the hospital a ring to find out. There is no point in wasting their time if its gonna be too loud / dangerous for me.
       
    22. Sebastians

      Sebastians Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      13/10/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Guitars, loud girls and guns
      I started getting into sound design and music production two years after my trauma and my debut album will be out in a couple of weeks. I mix at lower levels, max 65 db and take frequent breaks, no headphones. It took me two years before my hyperacusis and reactive T levelled out to be able to get to this point though.
      If it doesnt feel comfortable now, it probably isn’t the time yet.
       
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    23. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)
      I was thinking of making music that is compatible with my T as that's how I hear now. Simpler mixes more space for the elements to shine and to not lose my rag doing a mixdown :dohanimation:.
       
    24. HeavyMantra
      Bugridden

      HeavyMantra Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Seems like many music creators and audio engineers have posted on the forums lately, it's nice to see. I was thinking a lot about these things one year ago when tinnitus became a problem in my life. This is what I concluded:

      The info on safe decibel levels doesn't necessarily apply to people that already have noise induced tinnitus. Instead we have to pay attention to our ears and tinnitus to gauge what is safe for us. 70 dB or less can be dangerous for some people. Other people can handle more.

      Speaker type, the room, and source can matter a lot. Many people report that metal tweeters create more problems than say silk tweeters, but I think beryllium tweeters are different in this regard and probably better for sensitive ears compared to aluminum tweeters. Apart from regular listening fatigue we can run into specific problems that can be worked around, but it's not going to be the same for everyone. For some people volume is the main factor. For others certain frequencies can be the problem no matter the volume. One trick to try is to find out what frequecncies are problematic and just EQ them out in one way or another.

      Magnesium, turmeric and NAC can all be good supplements to consider. They are all supposed to be otoprotective so why not take them on days when you listen to a lot of music? I take them every day except NAC which I take when I expose myself to too much noise.

      Hyperacusis can be cured and that's positive, but it might require patience and abstinence. I initially just continued making music like I had but on pretty harsh speakers I loaned briefly, but I finally realized I need to take it really really slow. A few weeks ago I bought finally bought monitors. For the last 3 days I've been using them pretty much all day and I've not experienced any spikes. On the contrary my tinnitus has been very low 3 days in a row which is rare. My tinnitus fluctuates but it seems to be completely random.

      The only problem I experience is mild ear fullness if I listen too loud or to very harsh material. It's been one year after getting intrusive tinnitus, 6 months after getting mild hyperacusis. I expect the situation to improve even more the coming year if I do things correctly.

      There are so many engineers and artists with tinnitus and hyperacusis. I think most of them are still able to do what they do. Myself, my only hope is to be able to listen/create in peace in the studio. I was just going to start playing shows with one of my bands after we released a record, but I've decided that I simply cannot take the risk.
       
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    25. Mister Muso
      Creative

      Mister Muso Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2007 / April 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud music
      It's not just decibel levels, but frequencies. Higher frequencies can be more difficult to tolerate. As for volume, I would avoid 80db and upward like the plague. Even 60-70 db can be fatiguing for more than 10 minutes. I do listen to music every day, but gently does it. Headphones are problematic and best avoided. I am playing the upright piano again but only with hearing protection and in small doses (15 minutes or less), only on good days.

      Best of luck in continuing with your own musical passions!

      PS It's a hobby for me not my career, so not sure how useful my advice will be to you. Hope it works out for you.
       
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    26. HeavyMantra
      Bugridden

      HeavyMantra Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Just small update from me.. Turns out the ear pressure and intermittent pain that I thought was hyperacusis is most likely earwax that I am now softening by pouring olive oil into my ears several times a day. The issues have already improved.

      Lately I've realized I don't have hyperacusis anymore. Loud sounds sometimes makes me worry because I know they could potentially make my tinnitus worse, but I realize I could easily tolerate them if this wasn't the case. Actually my "normal" girlfriend is bothered by clanking dishes/other loud sounds more than me at the moment.

      Listening to/creating music every day now without problems. I don't know if exposing myself to the speakers has changed something psychologically or if the whole thing was earwax-related all along (no idea why I didn't consider this, since I've had problems with wax in the past). Good luck everyone
       
    27. Ed209

      Ed209 Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2015
      I’m going to interject here just to clear up a couple of inaccuracies. Sound levels of 40 dBA and below are very quiet - think of a library, for example - and a sound level of 30 dBA is basically an average quiet room. So, to say you were unable to listen to your hi-fi system at 30 dB seems a little misguided as your speakers would be pretty much inaudible at this level, and for all intents and purposes, it would be the equivalent to them being switched off.

      @Pink Noise, if I were you I’d have a little time to get your head straight first, but after you do, I see no reason why you couldn’t produce music as long as you followed a strict code of conduct when it comes to noise exposure. Remember, that as the producer, you should have full control over the noise you’re exposed to. Tell people in the live room/s not to play whilst you’re in there mic’ing stuff up, but use foam earplugs anyway in case someone does.

      When you are mixing and recording in the control room you should keep your levels down and take breaks when necessary. You also have the option of using musician earplugs with -10 dB filters if you absolutely have to.

      I think pain hyperacusis is more of an issue in regards to this line of work, but there are workarounds for tinnitus. At the end of the day, music production doesn’t have to be loud. My last two sessions in the studio were very very quiet ones. A bit too quiet in all honesty (because of all the sound-proofing and the fact that studios are largely quiet places outside of the live room - depending who’s in there of course!).

      Good luck to you in whatever path you decide to go down.
       
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    28. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Pink Noise
      Artistic

      Pink Noise Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably headphones (Overear) coupled with age (sigh)

      Thanks for the advice @Ed209.

      I make drum and bass music so it's mostly electronic. Under the control of the volume knob. I'm currently taking many breaks when doing my mixdown. Will do about half an hour and take a break and then go back down. I'm not suffering from pain, just a little odd distortion that I'm trying to work around. I'm working at 50db at the moment which feels comfortable.
       
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    29. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      With respect I was the one listening to my HI-FI you were not. During the 24 years that I have had tinnitus, as yet I haven't read a post in any tinnitus forum, and I visit quite a few or corresponded with anyone by telephone or email, that has described their tinnitus or hyperacusis to the severity of what mine used to be. I am not saying my tinnitus and hyperacusis were worse than anybody else. I am saying I have no recollection of anyone describing anything similar to what I have endured. I appreciate that no two people will experience tinnitus or hyperacusis the same as the experience will be unique to each person. However, there are certain similarities in the way these conditions present themselves to an individual and that is what I am referring to.

      The information below is for anyone reading this post.

      My tinnitus and hyperacusis were so severe, I frequently had to ask people to please lower their voice during conversation as my ears would be in pain. Due to the noise trauma from headphone use, the whole of my head and auditory system felt completely numb for about six months. I could hear but everything sounded as if my head was immersed under water. One night around 2am, I suddenly awoke to both ears blasting to the sound of high pitched whistle, just like the old-fashioned kettle that whistled when it reached boiling point on the gas hob. I was so frightened I quickly got dressed and drove to my local hospital to be seen at Accident & Emergency.

      Twenty four years ago I had no Internet access and learnt about tinnitus from books and the British Tinnitus Association. Fortunately I met a Herbalist that knew about Tinnitus which was caused by noise trauma (Noise induced tinnitus) When I described my symptoms she told me my auditory system was suffering from severe noise trauma brought on by headphones used at too high a volume. I was advised to start taking magnesium tablets to help repair the nerves in the auditory system since it mainly consists of nerves. She said this would help cure the numbness I was experiencing but said it would take time. Although I could hear I knew that I had or sensed that I had some hearing impairment. My appointment to be seen at ENT was 6 months away.

      The Herbalist also advised me to start taking Gingko Biloba in tincture form and said it will improve my hearing and possibly help the tinnitus. She told me GB improves the blood circulation the extremities of the body: feet, hands and head including the auditory pathways. By the time I was seen at ENT my head no longer felt completely numb which was a relief. After I had my hearing test my ENT consultant said my hearing was well above normal. He asked if I had been taking anything and I mentioned Gingko Biloba and Magnesium tablets, on the advice of a Herbalist. He said the advice was right and is something that he recommends all his tinnitus patients to try.

      After two years the hyperacusis was completely cured wearing white noise generators as part of TRT for up to 10hrs a day and using sound enrichment at night. I also had counselling. The tinnitus reduced to a low level. Unfortunately, I suffered a second noise trauma in 2008 that I have written about in my post: My Experience with tinnitus, in the link below. Fortunately the hyperacusis did not return and I do not experience any sensitivity to sound.

      I will not be commenting further on this topic.

      Michael



      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/my-experience-with-tinnitus.12076/
       
    30. Ed209

      Ed209 Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2015
      Michael, I wasn’t trying to be disrespectful towards you and I tried to make sure that I worded my response appropriately.

      What you described would be incredibly unusual and I’m wondering if you maybe have your numbers mixed up? A quiet room on average is around 27 dB - 30 dB, so your speakers would have barely been operating above the threshold of what the average person experiences as silence. You would have been exposed to higher levels of sound in pretty much any other environment, so what you said seems a bit nonsensical.

      Also, if your tinnitus was really loud, how on earth did you hear any sound from your speakers at 30 dB?

      Again, it’s with respect. I’m just trying to make sense of what you said.
       
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