This Has Got Me Thinking... (About Loud Sounds Causing Tinnitus)

Discussion in 'Support' started by Vaba, Sep 5, 2016.

tinnitus forum
    1. Vaba
      Shitfaced

      Vaba Member

      Location:
      New New York
      Tinnitus Since:
      Unknown
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown. Gradual, Progressive
      So, I went to my neighbor's 40th surprise birthday party two days ago, and it was pretty fun. There was a lot of alcohol, a lot of sentimentality, and, you guessed it, a lot of very loud music in a very small, stone space.

      Despite being pretty drunk and being within 20 ft of these speaker stacks for FIVE HOURS, it has been two days now and I notice no change in my tinnitus. I haven't posted here in a few days, but this situation sort of begs this question:

      If this extreme volume over that long period of time didn't hurt me at all or even cause a temporary spike, and since people here seem to insist that loud noise is the main cause of T, then what ear-splitting, explosively loud sounds could I possibly have exposed myself to that caused me to originally get T? It would have had to have been louder than the music at that event. Where's the logic behind it?.
       
    2. Kane Moffat
      Badass

      Kane Moffat Member

      Location:
      Glasgow, Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2015
      Hearing damage is cumulative, if you did that twice a week for a year you would probably notice a change in your T.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    3. Candy

      Candy Member Benefactor Team Awareness

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unidentified
      I've not been to a club for about 18 years (didn't go that often anyway). Hardly listen to music as always find it too emotional, have no detectable hearing loss yet have developed this? It confuses me...
       
    4. Vaba
      Shitfaced

      Vaba Member

      Location:
      New New York
      Tinnitus Since:
      Unknown
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown. Gradual, Progressive
      Yeah. It is cumulative. However, while I did listen to music fairly often, it was always at a safe volume (a volume that most other people listen at, usually around 50-60%) and I never noticed significant T at any point up until I was in college, when it suddenly came out of the woodwork. Of course, I had the "normal" background sound that most people have before this (an inaudible buzz unless in a dead silent room) but I just... woke up one day with screaming T and facial numbness.
       
    5. undecided
      Fine

      undecided Member

      Location:
      Greece
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown.
      All those cases of "woke one with T and vestibular problems / facial numbness / visual issues".
      I'd go as far as calling them ischemic episodes during sleep, possibly due to sleep apnea or some other unidentifiable issue. A small stroke if you will, that hits where the body is weakest...
      Of course I have no evidence to support that but I believe I'm one of these cases.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    6. Alue

      Alue Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      That's an interesting thought. Some medications can cause ischemia in other parts of the body.
       
    7. Vaba
      Shitfaced

      Vaba Member

      Location:
      New New York
      Tinnitus Since:
      Unknown
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown. Gradual, Progressive
      Since someone changed the title of the post against my will, I want to state that yes, I know that loud noise causes tinnitus. I'm not pretending that this isn't the truth. Veterans can get it from a single 160dB+ bomb blast.

      The question I am posing in this post is: Just HOW MUCH noise does one have to expose themselves to to get T? It seems to be an INSANE amount. It seems like if even that much (95-115dB at its peak peak) noise isn't enough to cause any spike or discomfort at all, then how, in the past 10 years, did does anyone accumulate that much damage, without being concerned for their health? People with T must have exposed ourselves to hours upon hours of 85dB plus sound for 8 hours or more a day, or lit of fireworks in our homes weekly. That's crazy.
       
    8. Kane Moffat
      Badass

      Kane Moffat Member

      Location:
      Glasgow, Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2015
      I read in a study that you can damage your SGN which is a major reason for T, with sustained noise of only 70 db for about 10 hours a day. Thats only 5db above conversation level and less than a busy road. So hearing damage can occur at much quieter sound levels than you might think.

      Also some people are more vulnerable to tinnitus as a result of not being able to recover as well from loud noise exposure- genetic. So your ears may just be particularly weak.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    9. undecided
      Fine

      undecided Member

      Location:
      Greece
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown.
      The genetic-hereditary factor is also a big player, I believe that.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    10. Foncky
      Doubtful

      Foncky Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Europe
      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2004
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      An explosion, music, and fate.
      There is no serious answer to that.
       
    11. Fangen
      Monday blues

      Fangen Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Stockholm, Sweden
      Tinnitus Since:
      December 2nd, 2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma (loud concert for 1h)
      I am sure you have seen something similar before. Hearing damage is cumulative, which has lead to my T. I used to go to bars and clubs when I was younger and my ears would ring, which I just ignored rather to take it as a big warning that my hears are getting beaten real bad. Going to a concert last year, it became the last drop and T was here to stay. But some people have genes that allows them to withstand longer exposure than showed below without getting NIHL, while other people are very sensitive to loud noises. Each person is different and the chart is only a general recommendation.

      decibel_exposure_chart.gif
       

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