Tinnitus Pitch and Loudness Matching

Discussion in 'Support' started by Jon Wayne, Jan 27, 2012.

tinnitus forum
    1. Jon Wayne

      Jon Wayne Member

      Location:
      europe
      Tinnitus Since:
      2010
      Saw a few people online describing their tinnitus frequency in terms of Hz, I'm ignorant when it comes to this, how does one find this out, any idea guys?
       
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    2. Markku
      Inspired

      Markku Director Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing
      Tinnitus pitch matching

      Tinnitus pitch match is a test of physical tones that is matched to the sounds or tones that a person with tinnitus hear.

      I found some online tests: http://www.digital-recordings.com/tinnitus-test/tt-products.html
      For example: http://www.digital-recordings.com/tinnitus-test/www-tt-pure-tone/tt_help_pure_tone.html
      (and click Proceed on the bottom of the page)
      If you have good headphones, you could probably try and find your tinnitus Hz frequency using one of those online WWW tests.

      The online test looks like this:
      20120127-mfyj5d4xpqew767s7kbknse368.png



      But yeah, while you asked only about the frequency of tinnitus, it's also worth mentioning that the sensation level (dB SL) of tinnitus is also sometimes measured. Some people know their tinnitus frequency/pitch and also the dB SL of their tinnitus. More about the latter below.


      Tinnitus loudness matching
       
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    3. Jon Wayne

      Jon Wayne Member

      Location:
      europe
      Tinnitus Since:
      2010
      thank you so much for the thorough reply Markku, this makes the picture much more clear
       
    4. Sophie

      Sophie Member

      Location:
      Pennsylvania, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      January 19, 2012
      Hi Markku,
      I wanted to clarify something. I went to one ENT doctor who had some tests done. He said my tinnitus frequency is 6000HZ. Then I went to another doctor and had audio tests. They said my tinnitus frequency match is 2khz at 15db. Could you explain to me what all this mean?
      Thank You.
       
    5. Markku
      Inspired

      Markku Director Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing
      I don't know why your tinnitus frequency was different in both instances, 2 kHz vs 6 kHz.
      I suppose the frequency test was done the usual way, i.e. the doctor output different tones and you had to pick one that you thought was closest to the tone of your tinnitus?


      Speaking of loudness, the 15 dB seems quite loud if it's sensory level. As stated above, in over 70 % of cases the level is 6 dB SL or less.

      Do you know if the doctor measured sensory level? Do you know if you have any hearing loss? If you have hearing loss, it's possible your hearing threshold at the tinnitus frequency might be, for example, 8 dB, and thus when the doctor measured 15 dB level for your tinnitus, the actual result (tinnitus loudness) would be 7 dB SL.

      So basically the dB sensory level means the following:
      • Markku goes to an audiologist. The audiologist outputs a tone of 6 kHz, first at 1 dB and then slowly increasing the volume. Markku only first hears the tone when the volume is 8 dB. Thus the threshold of hearing is 8 dB. Then the audiologist continues increasing the volume and Markku says at 20 dB that yes, this is very close to the volume of my perceived tinnitus. This means that the dB sensory level is 20 - 8 = 12 dB. Markku's tinnitus loudness is matched at 12 dB SL.
      • Sophie goes to an audiologist. The audiologist outputs a tone, and Sophie hears the sound immediately, so her threshold of hearing is 0 dB. Then the audiologist increases the volume, and Sophie says the volume is matched to her tinnitus when the loudness is at 10 dB. Sophie's tinnitus loudness is matched at 10 dB SL.
      But if your doctor didn't specify sensory level, and if you're not sure whether you might have some hearing loss, your actual tinnitus loudness might be different. Without the sensory level aspect, someone's 40 dB tinnitus can be tiny compared to some other person's 40 dB tinnitus, depending on the threshold of hearing.


      Hope this helped somewhat and have a great weekend :)
      Markku
       
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    6. Peter Phua
      Breezy

      Peter Phua Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Hi All,

      I'd like to share a Tinnitus Frequency Matching Tuner that is also available for free on-line. It's produced by my firm, and I'd like to thank Markku for granting us permission to make some limited posts regarding the service we provide. The tuner can be found at: http://www.audionotch.com/app/tune/

      Here's a screenshot:
      tuner image.jpg

      Tuning your tinnitus is definitely challenging at times. Speaking for myself, it took me several tries with our manual tuner in order to find it. Other tuning procedure are out there (i.e. binary search algorithms) but I've personally found that manual tuning is the best - the feedback from comparing your tone to the computer tone is immediate and your brain has a reference point (the figure in Hz) to make a comparison with. Mine was personally at 17,000 hZ, which is quite high. (Very few studies have been done on treatment at this frequency level, unfortunately).

      Cheers,
      Peter,
      Co-Founder
      www.audionotch.com/
       
    7. dj_newark

      dj_newark Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      1990
      Hello,

      How would I go about having an audiologist measure the severity of my tinnitus? I would not even know what test to ask for. Any advice?

      Thanks!
       
    8. Markku
      Inspired

      Markku Director Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing
      I merged your new thread about assessing tinnitus severity with this existing one about loudness matching. Hope you find the previous posts helpful.

      Of course, tinnitus loudness isn't always the same as tinnitus severity. Some person's loud tinnitus might not affect them much, for others it can be the other way around, a relatively low (even almost inaudible) tinnitus can cause a lot of trouble.

      So... a better tool to assess the severity is, for example, Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI).

      I attached the TFI questionnaire (.pdf) to this message. It contains the questions and also the scoring instructions.
       

      Attached Files:

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    9. dj_newark

      dj_newark Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      1990
      Great, that's very helpful. Thank you!
       
    10. Peter Phua
      Breezy

      Peter Phua Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Hi everyone:

      My coworker has developed a new software program that provides features over and above those considered standard with regular tinnitus tuning (pitch/frequency detection) software. The software allows you to listen to "atypical" tinnitus tones that are not the typical "sine wave." There is also a neat visualization feature and auto frequency adjustment feature.

      (http://www.audionotch.com/app/tune2/) (please note, requires Safari or Chrome).

      We're still working on updating it to include even more tinnitus sounds.

      When pitch matching, also be aware of Octave Confusion: http://www.audionotch.com/blog/tinnitus/what-is-octave-confusion/

      I think that some of you may find this free tool useful.

      Disclosure: I run http://www.audionotch.com/, a Notched Sound Therapy proprietor. There's a lot of discussion (some of which I've participated in on this forum) regarding Notched Sound Therapy, and you can check it out. Be aware that it's possible to do it yourself for free (we offer software so you don't have to do that).
       
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    11. JohnJ

      JohnJ Member

      Location:
      Kent, UK.
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2013
      I've tried to determine the pitch of my T with the AudioNotch tuner thing. I think it's about 7000khz but I'm not sure. I find that I can't hear any tones above about 10000khz. I was wondering if it's possible for the pitch of your T to be above that which you can physically hear? So if I was an octave out with my 7000khz it's possible my T is actually 10500khz (is that right?) in which case I wouldn't physically be able to hear the tone to match it?

      John
       
    12. JTP
      No Mood

      JTP Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Finland
      Tinnitus Since:
      5/2013
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Shit happens
      Hi John,

      It is quite possible, my T is partly above my hearing abilities frequency-wise. AFAIK if you go octave up from 7000 Hz that means doubling of the frequency to 14 000 Hz. Sometimes it is surprisingly hard to find frequency match to your tinnitus even when you could hear that frequency.
       
    13. Leah

      Leah Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Chardon, Ohio USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Curious, will give it a try. Thanks
       
    14. kmohoruk
      Nerdy

      kmohoruk Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2005
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud Noise, Ear Infection, TMJ
      Hello Everyone,

      I know this may be a bit more of a pointless question. But I was sort of curious.

      When I got my ears tested with an Audiologist, she ended up trying to match my tinnitus. We went through the regular tests, listening and saying certain words etc.

      I ended up being in the sound proof booth for about maybe 8 minutes before we actually started to try and match my T. Mine ended up being at 1,000Hz tone at 30 db in my right ear and 50 db in my left.

      Do you think that being in the room for that long may have played a bit of an illusion on my ears as I was in a sound proof room for such a long time, that it may have contributed to a louder perception of my Tinnitus?

      I was also still new when it came to dealing with this spike in my Tinnitus. So I hadn't really eaten much and had a coffee before going (I know not the smartest thing, but I was so tired in those early days that I needed something to get me through the day)
       
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    15. Jay M
      Thinking

      Jay M Member

      Location:
      South Carolina, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      4/4/14
      Yes.
       
    16. Bambi

      Bambi Member

      Location:
      Norway
      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2009
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I see a lot of you know what db your tinnitus is at.

      How do you measure this? Do you feel it helps to know?


      Edit; after my question was merged, I got the how-question answered, but still; do you feel that it helps to know your frequency/bd?
       
    17. Valentina
      No Mood

      Valentina Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Is there a way to know how loud is our T (in dB), without going to a doctor everytime? Any gear similar to the one we use for Hz, but which measures the volume?
       
    18. Geo

      Geo Member Benefactor

      Location:
      California
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2012
      @Valentina i would be scared ro know my bad t results..
       
    19. Valentina
      No Mood

      Valentina Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      @Geo Why scared? Your T will not change if you know how loud it is.
       
    20. Geo

      Geo Member Benefactor

      Location:
      California
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2012
      Yeah but knowing that my T is actually worse than most sounds harsh
       
    21. kevin talley

      kevin talley Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      5/2000
      Using Peter Phua's test... 9610, seems to match my tone. At 12000, and 16000, I hear nothing but hear lower frequency tones above those points. 9610 sounds the same with the volume up or down but I can hear it turn off and on. . Is this a hearing problem or a failure of the tone generator?

      Trying this against a simple online tone generator makes me believe it is the software. It also seems to have made my tinnitus worse.
       
    22. suera

      suera Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2010
      I never had db measured just hz, I had to go to an audiologist that has special equipment. It is my understanding that standard equipment measures 8KHZ and below. Mine is in the 12-14KHZ range.
       
    23. Sgguy46
      Jaded

      Sgguy46 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Stress
      Mine is 10 to 13khz. It is accompanied by a dull migraine somedays like today. It sounds metallic and raw. I want to believe life will become better and i will somehow habituate to this. Life has become a million times more challenging.
       
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