Auditory Brainstem Implant for the Treatment of Tinnitus — Clinical Trial

Discussion in 'Research News' started by Candy, Sep 30, 2016.

    1. Candy

      Candy Member Benefactor Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unidentified
    2. The Red Viper
      Curious

      The Red Viper Member

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      March 15, 2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Current Theory: Neck injury (Tendonitis @ trap/SCM junction)
      If I were to have an implant in my brain stem, it better give me superhuman mental abilities, cognition, and memory.
       
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Candy

      Candy Member Benefactor Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unidentified
      Apologies for the silly question...what does this mean? Found it on ATA...
       
    4. Ian Mac

      Ian Mac Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Vestibular Nueritis, loud music (dubstep)
      Whoa.. BUMP
       
    5. Foncky
      Tired

      Foncky Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Europe
      Tinnitus Since:
      March 2004
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Music. Balloon. Genes.
      That would be like a cochlear implant but without the inner ear massive destruction ?

      Sounds cool. Very invasive, juste like CI's, but cool.
       
    6. Mario martz
      Creative

      Mario martz Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2016
      WOW
      awesome, thanks for posting candy...
      i think its gonna take a while...
      6poj2b.png
       
    7. Codaz

      Codaz Member

      It has now been delayed from 2019 to 2024 and still is recruiting?
       
    8. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Advocate

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Well it is not the results of the clinical trial, but it is a related case study.

      Neural Substrates of Tinnitus in an Auditory Brainstem Implant Patient

      Introduction: It was previously demonstrated that tinnitus due to profound unilateral hearing loss can be treated by the use of electrical stimulation via a cochlear implant (CI) with long-lasting positive effects. In cases where patients are not suitable for cochlear implantation due to aplasia/hypoplasia, cochlear malformations etc., an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) may be a solution. While auditory performance with ABI is well investigated, it is currently unknown whether stimulation through ABI also renders tinnitus reduction in patients with incapacitating tinnitus. The current case study reports on the subjective tinnitus perception during a 5-year follow-up period. In addition, a first H215O PET imaging study in an ABI patient is carried out revealing underlying neural substrates of tinnitus.

      Methods: A 56-year-old male single-sided deaf patient with incapacitating tinnitus received an ABI after insufficient auditory performances and only minor tinnitus reduction with CI. Audiological follow-up was carried out during a 5-year follow-up period comprising pure-tone audiometry, speech-in-quiet testing, speech-in-noise testing, tinnitus questionnaires (tinnitus questionnaire and numeric rating scale) and the HISQUI19 questionnaire. To investigate the neural substrates of tinnitus in this subject, H215O PET tomography scans were acquired in three different conditions: 1) ABI switched off which was considered as the resting-state measurement rendering the loudest possible tinnitus for the patient (ABI OFF); 2) ABI switched on causing a small suppression of tinnitus due to electrical stimulation (ABI ON); 3) ABI switched on and 70 dB SPL white noise presented directly to the external audio processor through a direct audio cable providing the maximum tinnitus suppression for the patient (NOISE).

      Results: Subjectively the patient reported a significant tinnitus reduction after implantation which remained stable over time with a decrease in tinnitus questionnaire from grade 4 to grade 2 and a 50% reduction in the numeric rating scale (from 8 to 4) during the 5-year period. Comparing the ABI OFF and ABI ON conditions, significant increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was observed in brain areas involved in the salience network showing already suppression of tinnitus only by electrical stimulation in the absence of auditory stimuli. The NOISE condition showed relatively decreased rCBF in the insula (as well as in the orbitofrontal cortex) as compared with the ABI OFF condition. Abnormally activated areas comprising the salience network may have been significantly suppressed by the NOISE condition both by acoustic and electrical stimulations of the auditory pathway. Moreover, the NOISE condition showed significantly decreased rCBF in the parahippocampus as compared with the ABI OFF condition. This finding supports the idea of distinct tinnitus generators depending on the amount of hearing loss.

      Conclusion: The reduction of tinnitus in the current ABI subject may be attributable to partial peripheral reafferentation-induced deactivation of the parahippocampus-based tinnitus generator as well as the salience network. Further validation is required by the use of a follow-up study with a larger number of subjects.

      Source: https://journals.lww.com/otology-ne..._Substrates_of_Tinnitus_in_an_Auditory.5.aspx
       
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    9. ThijsD

      ThijsD Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      24/04/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Stress anxiety
      • Like Like x 5
      • Informative Informative x 1
    10. WillBeNimble
      Buzzed

      WillBeNimble Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Location:
      Ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Damage from earphones
      Well, I don't like the prospect, but any move forward at this point.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    11. tommyd87

      tommyd87 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1999
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      tmj music
      Due to the type of treatment?
       
    12. WillBeNimble
      Buzzed

      WillBeNimble Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Location:
      Ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Damage from earphones
      Yeah, due to the type of treatment, but I'm still happy to see progress.
       
    13. Thuan

      Thuan Member

      Location:
      California
      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection
      Me neither but if it truly eliminates tinnitus... and FX-322 doesn't work... this is the only route left. Then again, I don't think it's worth if it only reduces tinnitus. It would be similar to just masking devices for many but would be a life saver for unmaskable tinnitus.

      Too bad severing the cochlear nerve doesn't work.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    14. FGG
      No Mood

      FGG Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Multi-factorial
      You probably realized this but the man in this study was completely deaf in one ear and could not mask his tinnitus so this was huge for him.

      Auditory Brainstem Implants are not yet used for those with virtually any residual hearing and if you go on YouTube you can hear just how low fidelity the sound transmission is. I think that is part of why they had to pump.in white noise to stimulate the implant more fully but the fact that a dramatic reduction occurred is further evidence tinnitus is not "stuck in the brain." It doesn't seem that it was solely a masking effect in this case.

      Cochlear implants produce way better sound than ABI (and often reduce tinnitus even without outside noise/masking) but some people are not CI candidates for a few rare reasons (as I assume the person in the study).

      Companies are working on way better implants, however, and Utah Array is even working on one that implants directly into the cochlear nerve instead (with apparently much better quality sound, and likely better tinnitus reduction too).
       
      • Informative Informative x 2
    15. GlennS

      GlennS Member Podcast Patron Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      1992
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud music
      My takeaway from this is that if hearing signal is restored, tinnitus goes down, bolstering the case for FX-322 doing the job.
       
      • Like Like x 2
      • Agree Agree x 1
    16. Mentos

      Mentos Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Cracow, Poland
      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced, loud rock concert
      Email reply I got from Minke van den Berge from University of Groningen:

      Indeed we have a trial studying the auditory brainstorm implant (stimulating the dorsal cochleae nucleus) for tinnitus. Very interesting! We have now implanted 2 patients. We are enrolling patients with unilateral tinnitus, and hearing loss on this side. We have to enroll more patients before we can publish the results. I expect a definite paper in the next 2-3 years. It will be published in international journals.

      Interesting. More researchers aside from Susan Shore exploring Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus stimulation. Long time to wait though.

      @Christiaan did you consider to get enrolled?
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
    17. Christiaan
      Vegged out

      Christiaan Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Location:
      The Hague, the Netherlands
      Tinnitus Since:
      2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Bloody headphones in 2016,worsened in 2020
      It seems very interesting for those with one sided hearing loss @Mentos.

      I have NIHL in both ears. I'm still waiting out for FX-322, RL-81 and an efficient TNF-A blocker (that doesn't diminish the immune system). Last resort is DBS.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    18. Johan001

      Johan001 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Medication
      I have one sided tinnitus, but mild hearing loss on both sides. I see the inclusion criteria is having tinnitus for longer than a year. The procedure seems quite radical, so I will definitely look forward to seeing the results with those already in the trials before attempting something like this. Good to see serious research going on in the Netherlands and not another CBT waste of time.
       
      • Agree Agree x 2

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