Dietary Vitamin C Supplementation Reduces Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Guinea Pigs

Discussion in 'Research News' started by Danny Boy, Feb 26, 2016.

    1. Danny Boy
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      Ear infection
      Dietary vitamin C supplementation reduces noise-induced hearing loss in guinea pigs.
      McFadden SL1, Woo JM, Michalak N, Ding D.
      Author information

      Abstract
      Vitamin C (ascorbate) is a water-soluble, low molecular weight antioxidant that works in conjunction with glutathione and other cellular antioxidants, and is effective against a variety of reactive oxygen species, including superoxide and hydroxyl radicals that have been implicated in the etiology of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Whereas most animals can manufacture their own vitamin C, humans and a few other mammals such as guinea pigs lack the terminal enzyme for vitamin C synthesis and must obtain it from dietary sources. To determine if susceptibility to NIHL could be influenced by manipulating dietary levels of vitamin C, albino guinea pigs were raised for 35 days on a diet with normal, supplemented or deficient levels of ascorbate, then exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 114 dB SPL for 6 h to induce permanent threshold shifts (PTS) of the scalp-recorded auditory brainstem response. Animals that received the highest levels of dietary ascorbate developed significantly less PTS for click stimuli and 4, 8, 12, and 16 kHz tones than animals on normal and deficient diets. Outer hair cell loss was minimal in all groups after noise exposure, but permanent damage to stereocilia were observed in noise-exposed ears. The results support the hypothesis that dietary factors influence individual susceptibility to hearing loss, and suggest that high levels of vitamin C may be beneficial in reducing susceptibility to NIHL.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15811712
       
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    2. Asvalian
      Chatty

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      Unknown at the moment, prob hearing lost/stress.
      I find interesting the fact tha vitamin C can work to prevent hearing loss, although if I'm not mistaken cannot reverse the damage done, right?
       
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    3. Silvio Sabo
      Pooptoast

      Silvio Sabo Member Benefactor

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      Noise - I think
      Vitamin C is a potent anti-oxidant and thus can take care of free radicals that can cause damage to cells. If I'm not mistaken a cascade reaction that involves free radicals is set off in the cochlea in response to loud noise. I know that there is a cascade reaction that kills hair cells as this is what AM-101 is supposed to treat but I'm unsure about the involvement of free radicals. But I think I have read it somewhere.
       
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    4. Lane

      Lane Member

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      February, 2018
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      Ototoxic Drug
      I ran across a testimonial a few days ago by a person who claimed that taking high doses of Vitamin C within 24 hours of an acoustic trauma can dramatically improve the prospects for avoiding NIHL and long-term tinnitus. I just tried to find that testimonial, but couldn't (I could kick myself for not bookmarking it). But I just did an online search, and discovered the study that's the title of this thread--and thought it would be good to revive this old thread.

      The study seems to support the testimonial I ran across and the hypothesis that Vitamin C can possibly make a big difference for somebody experiencing an acoustic trauma. Running across this study reminded me of so many on this forum who have tried prednisolone to try to achieve the same positive results. Some have gotten improvement, others haven't, and some have not been able to get their doctors to even provide a prescription for it.

      In my search this morning, I also came across another somewhat similar study. I think the two studies combined make a strong case for taking high doses of Vitamin C as soon as possible after an acoustic trauma. Seems like nothing to lose, perhaps a whole lot to gain. The following study and abstract give some clues on some other things that might also be helpful...

      Vitamin E and vitamin C in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss

      Abstract
      The results of this study suggest that the administration of vitamin E and vitamin C to patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) has beneficial effects by reducing the level of reactive oxygen metabolites produced by inner ear ischaemia and reperfusion injury after treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of antioxidant vitamin E and vitamin C in the treatment of ISSHL.

      In a retrospective chart review, a total of 87 patients were enrolled who fulfilled the following inclusion criteria: 1) sudden onset of sensorineural hearing loss, 2) cause of hearing loss unknown, 3) hearing loss did not fluctuate, 4) arithmetic mean of hearing levels at 250, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz exceeded 40 dB and 5) treatment was started within 14 days from the onset of hearing loss.

      All the patients were treated with steroids and/or alprostadil. In the study group, patients additionally received vitamin E (tocopherol nicotinate, 600 mg/day) and vitamin C (1200 mg/day) orally. The hearing gain after therapy was 29.4 dB and the improvement rate was 63.3% in the study group, compared with 18.5 dB and 44.0% in the control group. Significant improvement was seen in the hearing gain and recovery rate in the study group.​
       
    5. FGG
      No Mood

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      Your study is for idiopathic loss, not acoustic trauma. Which may point to it being better for viral causes since that's suspected to be a common cause of idiopathic loss.
       
    6. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

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      @Lane
      Check out
      https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/05/200512151941.htm
       
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