Got MRI Results — Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Loop Conflict Compressing Cochlear Nerve?

Discussion in 'Support' started by Lulu187, Oct 14, 2019.

    1. Lulu187

      Lulu187 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1 week ago
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Hi guys,

      My MRI has shown that I have:

      "Association between anterior inferior cerebellar artery loop conflict which may be compressing my cochlear nerve" this is only in the right ear, which is where my tinnitus is.

      So my hypothesis that the ringing is vascular in nature seems to he accurate.

      Has anybody has a similar or same MRI finding?

      Are there any treatments?
       
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    2. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Your ENT doctor should be able to advise you on treatments. Whether medical or surgical. In some cases tinnitus is treated by Audiology. There you will see either an Audiologist or Hearing Therapist that specialises in tinnitus and hyperacusis management.

      Michael
       
    3. tiniturtle

      tiniturtle Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      3/19/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Paromomycin
      You should consult neurosurgery. It's unlikely ENT or an audiologist can help with this.
       
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    4. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      Intracranial microvascular compression is common with tinnitus. Although an actual syndrome is not common. The vestibulocochlear nerve compressed by a venous loop inside the internal auditory canal (IAC) is very uncommon as a cause of PT so you probably just have regular T or somatic physical as the cochlear area is tightly fitted. As mentioned above, consult neurosurgery because it's noted on the same side as your tinnitus. Surgical intervention is very successful.

      I still wonder if you don't have compression of another sort. Muscle compression of shoulders leading to the sternocleidomastoid of neck. This would be one sided and most likely the right side. Have you ever had a compression massage of shoulders and if so, did this relieve your T a little?
       
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    5. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Lulu187

      Lulu187 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1 week ago
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I feel like I might have some compression in my cervical spine and possibly the sterno muscle. I'm thinking of getting a neck adjustment at a chiro and see how I go from there.

      Im also getting sharp pain in the right ear when I burp, and every time I swallow I hear a crackle but that's in both ears.

      Strange?

      Is there any particular imaging I should get for the neck?
       
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    6. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      From the order of what you said - TMJ most probable - ETD - sinus next.
      Before you get a neck adjustment I would discuss that with a neuro because of your MRI results.
       
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    7. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Lulu187

      Lulu187 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1 week ago
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown

      Thank you for the guidance. Who would I see for tmj?

      I will definitely speak to the neurologist first before going for a neck adjustment, last thing I want is for this to get even louder.
       
    8. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Lulu187

      Do you have any vertigo?
      Do you recall any type of head sounds going back well before recent onset?
      Do you have an appointment for a neuro review or did you already have one?
      Please don't worry, as you have a very strong chance to regain full health with tinnitus disappearing.
      You mention that you don't have hearing loss, but do ask for a follow-up MRI review.

      "I'm also getting sharp pain in the right ear when I burp, and every time I swallow I hear a crackle but that's in both ears.."

      For this have a dentist check your jaw, then a discussion with your ENT, if your dentist says that you don't have a dental problem.
       
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    9. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Lulu187

      Lulu187 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1 week ago
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I diddnt ever get any sounds before onset of the tinnitus. But I did have quite alot of head fullness feelings esoecially when I would sit for long periods of time such as when I'd be studying it would get so uncomfortable and make me fatigued (but not painful) where I used to have to lay down on my stomach and study that way.

      I haven't seen a neuro yet. I'm waiting for my ent to give me a referral. He was supposed to call me today but diddnt.

      Should I take my mri images to the neuro when I finally get to see him?

      Also, thank you very much for reassuring me, it means the world to me, and keeps me calm, when negative thoughts go through my head.

      I do have a wisdom tooth that has fully erupted in my right side that isnt causing me any pain, the left side wisdom tooth is about 60% erupted but also not causing pain. But I will make an appointment with my dentist to look at the jaw.

      I did just notice today after eating, the volume increases moderately but not significantly. But there is definitely a change in volume.
       
    10. tiniturtle

      tiniturtle Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      3/19/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Paromomycin
      That crackle you hear is your ET opening. This is pretty normal, especially with any kind of allergies or upper respiratory congestion. This happens to me occasionally, and it's benign.

      When you have a neuro consult, you should bring your images with you. They can't really full evaluate you until they have a good set of imaging.

      If you aren't experiencing pain and pressure from your wisdom teeth, a dental issue is unlikely, but it's worth investigating those seperately. I didn't have mine taken out until my early 30's. They were fully out and never caused an issue until I had a cavity in one. I asked the dentist to just take them all out.
       
    11. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Lulu187

      Mentioned before was that you get relieve when you put a lot of pressure underneath your ear.
      "I did just notice today after eating, the volume increases moderately but not significantly. But there is definitely a change in volume."

      So with both mentions, a TM joint check with your next regular dental appointment and a sinus/ET valuation when you have your follow-up with your ENT. Let us know how your neuro appointment goes. It may be without noted hearing loss that conservative treatment will be offered. You will pull thru this.

      https://tanenbaumtmj.com/2013/08/12/tmj-and-its-relationship-to-ear-problems-and-sinus-symptoms/

      "For instance, the muscle that determines the size of the Eustachian tube (influences ear pressure) is directly influenced by the same nerve that serves the jaw muscles and TM Joint. As a result, a TMJ problem can lead to changes in the way the Eustachian tube effects the ear."

      "With regard to sinus symptoms it is common for patients with TMJ to complain of pain and pressure in their sinuses, despite the fact that there is no sinus disease, infection, or inflammation. The reason is due to mechanisms of referral, where the site of the symptom is not the origin of the symptom. Jaw muscles in particular can refer pain to the sinus region often making a diagnosis difficult."


       

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