Has Anyone Got Tinnitus from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning?

Discussion in 'Support' started by bob bauer, Sep 2, 2017.

    1. bob bauer

      bob bauer Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2005
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      hearing loss- medication
      Has anyone got tinnitus from carbon monoxide exposure? Can it go away?
       
    2. Kolisar
      No Mood

      Kolisar Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      birth?
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      bob bauer

      bob bauer Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2005
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      hearing loss- medication
      Is there any hope my T will get better even if it was worsened by carbon monoxide? I did not have any poisoning symptoms and was checked the next day at hospital with blood test which was okay, but I waited over 24 hours to get blood test.
       
    4. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      Based on my reading of the descriptions of people's experiences posted here, most T spikes eventually get better. Temporary spikes often last longer than a week:
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/poll-how-long-do-your-tinnitus-spikes-usually-last.23110/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/poll-how-long-was-your-longest-spike.22099/
       
    5. Updownjohnny

      Updownjohnny Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Carbon monoxide poisoning
      Yes. I have tinnitus from carbon monoxide poisoning at work. It is absolutely debilitating. It has also caused a myriad of other problems. Onetime acute exposure of about 10 hours has changed my life forever. I have been at the same job for 30 years and everything changed in one day. I am now a different person due to pure on the job negligence! Contact me if you would like to talk!!
       
    6. Mircea Bastovoi

      Mircea Bastovoi Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Carbon monoxide poisoning
      Yes, I had a severe Carbon monoxide poisoning two years ago. I have lost my consciousness and just by luck some friends were looking for me a took me out of the house. I was unconscious for 15 hours. Since then I have a never ending tinnitus.
       
    7. Jreese

      Jreese Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      10/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
      I am so sorry this happened to you!

      I had a 14 hour exposure in October 2017. I now have constant tinnitus along with a few other debilitating symptoms. Do you or anyone else out there with CO exposure have any other lingering problems? I am really feeling alone and my medical team doesn’t seem to get the complexity of my condition. I’m not even sure I do. Any info is much appreciated.
       
    8. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      bob bauer

      bob bauer Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2005
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      hearing loss- medication
      Did you get it at work, or from being in a car in an enclosed garage?
       
    9. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Advocate

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Sudden hearing loss following acute carbon monoxide poisoning: A case report and literature review

      Introduction:
      Acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning could lead to headache, dizziness, myocardial injury, neurological sequela, and death. Sudden hearing loss is a rare symptom of acute CO poisoning.

      Case Presentation:

      Here, we report a case of a 42-year-old woman who suffered from acute hearing loss after exposure to a suicidal environment of high concentration of CO. Partial recovery of hearing was demonstrated after a combination of corticosteroid and hyperbaric oxygen therapy was given.

      Discussion:
      The mechanism of sudden hearing loss caused by acute CO poisoning is not well-established. It is believed to be related with the hypoxic damage to the cochlea. The characteristic of sudden hearing loss caused by acute CO poisoning is that it often affects in high frequency bilaterally.

      Conclusion:
      This report would prompt the clinician in early recognition of this sudden hearing loss of uncommon etiology.

      Full article: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1024907920969306
       

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