I Twisted Earplug to Slowly Pull Out -> They Reverse-Pressured, and Went in Further: Pain & Spike

Discussion in 'Support' started by rtlewis88, May 3, 2019.

    1. rtlewis88
      Daring

      rtlewis88 Member

      Location:
      Columbia, SC, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      1980s Concerts Hyperacusis Since: 2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud Music and Occupational Hazards as a Young Adult
      Hi all,

      (please skip down to the paragraph starting with "Therefore" if you are only wanting to see my question)

      I have been a member for a few months, but this is my first post. I wanted to learn all I could from you wonderful people, so I replaced my normal hobby of building and maintaining Linux operating systems for people, to using your posts (godsends) as the knowledge-base of my tinnitus & hyperacusis therapy.

      So, now it is time to come out of hiding, I suppose.

      I am 53, and have had low-grade tinnitus since a front-row-rock-concert exposure, at a big-city arena, back in the early 1980s. This never was an issue, but when my wife insisted on getting a dog with a loud screeching bark - and then more - a few years ago, my tinnitus became much worse - and then hyperacusis arrived. My family now includes these screechers - and there is nothing which can change there (short of divorce).

      Anyway, I have been accumulating earmuffs and earplugs of every variety. Pelter X-5-A are the ones that work the best; but of course they render me mostly unemployable, as well as a target, for the vicious folks who can come out of the woodwork when one appears exceedingly foolish in public (aside from directing planes, etc.).

      Therefore, to keep my life in order, I mostly have been wearing earplugs around any expected exposure above 70-80 dB. At first, I couldn't get any of the bullet types to fit in my extremely narrow canal bend - so I used the barrel shaped variety to avoid needing to pass the canal bend. Then I got the HEAROS Ultimate softness, and they went in right. The only problem was that they fit so well that they did not de-pressurize when I twisted them to slowly pull out. Instead, they reversed-pressured, and popped in further. I, of course, was eventually able to get them out (very slowly) by the normal method - but the pressure and sharp pain, in both ears, while doing it was mind-blowing. The result is a moderate spike which has lasted for 2 & a half days. I have since ordered (probably my 20th new variety - attempting to find my apex) the Howard Leight: Max Lite Low Pressure foam, and we shall see about them when they arrive.

      Hence, my question is pretty simple: is there much possibility that the reverse-pressure caused any thing permanent - what was happening to activate such sharp pain? The pressure was more than I figure anything in the ear could tolerate well - and still be unaffected. I'm telling you, the ear-pressure-pain (only during removal) was the worst of any type of ear pain in all my long years. First, intolerably sharp pain - then muffled tinnitus spike - then, the next day on, just the tinnitus spike.

      Thanks for reading, you are all awesome!
       
    2. Digital Doc

      Digital Doc Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise induced
      Earplugs from what you describe can cause a tinnitus spike. Most are temporary, but will take some time to know.

      Consider a pair of low profile ear muffs that dont look so obviously out of place. Also, I find Mack's ultra soft the easiest earplugs to insert
       
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      rtlewis88
      Daring

      rtlewis88 Member

      Location:
      Columbia, SC, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      1980s Concerts Hyperacusis Since: 2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud Music and Occupational Hazards as a Young Adult
      @Digital Doc, thanks for checking in, and you couldn't more correct there (I forgot to mention the one exception, with the Mack's). The only problem with those Mack's ultra softs is they always sucked in too far - my tiny canals create some incredible pressure. I'm thinking I am going to have to stick with a barrel type, or at least a foam plug that is made to dampen sound via a shorter method - that doesn't go past the bend.

      Also, I will, at some point, go with a lower profile muff as you suggest - for when I can't deal with plugs. But, for now the 29-30 dB reduction is perfect, with those mostly-hidden barrel shaped plugs. The main reason I have to make peace with the plugs, is because I am in the middle of a career change, and will likely be teaching college very soon. Thus, the muffs will be a non-starter during those semi-loud hours/days.

      The second half of my question still goes unanswered, however, so if anyone - with the expertise - could please try to put me at ease (or give me the bad news) regarding that horrible pressure-removal-process I speak of above.

      Thank you, again!
       
    4. Digital Doc

      Digital Doc Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise induced
      I do not have an answer to your 2nd question.

      You can certainly go with a PVC plug. I would also try a Silicone plug, either the musician ones, like Eargasm, or for greater protection, the 3M earsoft. Both are good for the environment you describe with occasional, intermittent noise exposure, and not too obvious when in place.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    5. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      rtlewis88
      Daring

      rtlewis88 Member

      Location:
      Columbia, SC, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      1980s Concerts Hyperacusis Since: 2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud Music and Occupational Hazards as a Young Adult
      Oh well, thanks anyway...
       

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