Low Frequency Hearing Loss and Tinnitus... Causes?

Discussion in 'Support' started by Lauren Morse, Aug 31, 2016.

tinnitus forum
    1. Lauren Morse
      Cowabunga

      Lauren Morse Member

      Location:
      Salt Lake City
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma/Migraines
      I have recently started to lose my low frequency hearing and have been experiencing a low, idling motor type of tinnitus on occassion which comes and goes and feels like my head is vibrating.
      It all started temporarily after I got up too fast and all of the blood rushed to my head and ears far too fast, causing a pulsating noise, a low frequency hearing loss, and a feeling like my ears were going to explode!

      My ears recovered the next day, but my low frequency hearing was damage a few days later while watching planes from a safe distance (noise level about 70 decibels) and after an MRI scan (90-95 db exposure for 4 minutes with earplugs). Strangely, neither of these noise evens resulted in high frequency hearing loss, so I don't know if it was really the noise that did it.

      My low frequency hearing is still going down in my left ear for reasons I do not understand.

      I have a history of inner ear migraines which can cause low frequency losses, but for me they have only usually affected the high frequencies in my dealings with them.

      Otherwise, what are the primary causes of this type of loss? Can the noise I was exposed to have potentially damage my low frequencies exclusively? Was vascular damage a possibility from the time I stood up?

      Thanks a lot for the help and insight.
       
    2. Lauren Morse
      Cowabunga

      Lauren Morse Member

      Location:
      Salt Lake City
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma/Migraines
      @Aaron123

      Yes, the low frequency loss is in both ears but seems worse in the left. The audiograms are pointless because they do not document losses below 250 hz, which is where I was losing some. I may have some loss 250-500 hz, but not as much.

      I have been told that migraines are causing the majority of my hearing loss events. The migraines (at least I believe) are being caused by abnormal muscle tension in my face and neck. So the real cause could be fibromyalgia, TMJ, who knows.

      But as I mentioned, I never had low frequency hearing loss prior to the second week of this month.
       
    3. GregCA
      Crappy

      GregCA Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Otosclerosis
      A couple of leads to consider: otosclerosis or cochlear hydrops.
       
    4. Jkph75

      Jkph75 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2/27/16
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      How do you know that you have lost low frequency hearing if you don't have an audiogram that shows it? Just because you hear a low noise doesn't mean that you have a low frequency loss. Those noises probably just aggregated your tinnitus. If your tinnitus is louder it doesn't necessarily mean that your hearing is worse.
       
    5. Lauren Morse
      Cowabunga

      Lauren Morse Member

      Location:
      Salt Lake City
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma/Migraines
      @Jkph75

      Audiograms are no good for documenting hearing losses if they occur in frequencies not tested. Audiograms also don't show certain types of hearing losses especially if it is synapse damage and not hair cell damage.

      I know I have lost low frequency hearing because I can hardly hear the bass in my music anymore without having to turn it up, and also because certain appliances in my house are suddenly only high or mid frequencies. And that motorcycles are suddenly much quieter. Yea, I think I know that I have lost them
       
    6. Lauren Morse
      Cowabunga

      Lauren Morse Member

      Location:
      Salt Lake City
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma/Migraines
      @GregCA
      I certainly don't have otoschlerosis.
      Do migraines cause cochlear hydrops? I have definitely had some symptoms of that in the past. However, diet modifications has never helped me and I eat almost no salt.
       
    7. GregCA
      Crappy

      GregCA Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Otosclerosis
      How did you rule it out?
       
    8. Jkph75

      Jkph75 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2/27/16
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      What does your audiogram look like?
       
    9. Lauren Morse
      Cowabunga

      Lauren Morse Member

      Location:
      Salt Lake City
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma/Migraines
      @Jkph75

      The last one I had was in early July. Only 5 db in the low or mid frequencies, with mild high frequency loss in the right (25 db at 6k and 20 at 8k), with a little bit of loss in the highs in the left ear. That of course was before I started losing the lows. But right now my health insurance is overburdened and I cannot afford to get another audiogram; I've already had around 5 in the past year!
       
    10. Lauren Morse
      Cowabunga

      Lauren Morse Member

      Location:
      Salt Lake City
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma/Migraines
      @GregCA

      Well, it's true that I have not had bone conduction hearing tested for a very long time, so I wouldn't really know. But all the ent's I've been to said my ears are healthy, and I have seen around 5 ear doctors in the past year.

      But given the fact that the losses usually follow (supposedly non-dangerously loud) noise exposure (including today, from walking in an unrelenting wind gust), I think something else must be going on. I've just never heard of getting exclusively low frequency hearing loss from kinda loud noises, nor have I ever experienced it. The only time I have gotten any low frequency loss previously was when I used to go clubbing and got exposed to heavy bass, which of course is understandable. But short exposures to 75-90 db low noises should not kill 5-10 db of low frequency hearing.
       
    11. Jkph75

      Jkph75 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2/27/16
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      It sounds like your audiologist or Dr did a bad job of explaining this to you, causing you to worry unnecessarily. Your hearing is completely normal. As an adult, 30 db is considered a hearing loss and most drs and audiologists would hardly be concerned to see a couple 30 db dips. You have a typical ski sloped shaped pattern of "hearing loss". This is common with age. For children normal hearing is up to 15 db. Everyone does not even start out with hearing at 0 db, so there is no way for you to know if your 5db are even losses at all. Tinnitus sucks but at least you don't have to worry about losing your low frequency hearing:)
       
    12. Lauren Morse
      Cowabunga

      Lauren Morse Member

      Location:
      Salt Lake City
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma/Migraines
      @Jkph7s

      Huh? Didn't I just explain that that this audiogram was done before I had the low frequency losses?

      By the way I am 22 so no that audiogram is not ok.
       
    13. GregCA
      Crappy

      GregCA Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Otosclerosis
      Sounds like it may be time to get tested.
       
    14. Lauren Morse
      Cowabunga

      Lauren Morse Member

      Location:
      Salt Lake City
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma/Migraines
      @GregCA
      I may well consider it, and thank you. Did you experience reductions in low frequency hearing when you were exposed to loud low frequency noises as a result of this? Also, doesn't otoschlerosis usually only present in one ear, but possibly occur in the other much later. I have bilateral low frequency hearing loss.
       
    15. Jkph75

      Jkph75 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2/27/16
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      You don't know that you have low frequency losses. You just think that you do. Hopefully, you can get another test at some point soon to ease your mind. In the meantime, there are some hearing test apps that you could try. If you have had 5 tests then you should see a trend. If the tests are all roughly the same then your hearing is probably not declining. I am just trying to help you. What have your dr's concluded from your information and hearing tests? I would listen to them over anyone online.
       
    16. GregCA
      Crappy

      GregCA Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Otosclerosis
      No I did not experience hearing loss in reaction to low frequency sounds.
      I guess it doesn't have to attack both ears simultaneously, but it's not impossible that it would.

      Anyway, why play the guess game? Just get it tested and you'll know. Both Rinne/fork and hearing tests with bone conduction are trivial tests to do.
       

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