Source of Tinnitus — Ear Inflammation or Brain — Is It Possible to Know?

Discussion in 'Support' started by mysterygal, Feb 17, 2017.

    1. mysterygal

      mysterygal Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear Infection
      Is there a way to tell if the tinnitus originates from ear mechanical issues, i.e. inflammation, injury vs. brain issues?
       
    2. bill 112
      Fine

      bill 112 Member

      Location:
      Republic Of Ireland
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise exposure
      Honestly no, most investigations will begin with an audiogram and other hearing tests and if they're clear they'll tell you it's not your hearing.

      They will then ask you various other health related conditions i.e stress, depression etc usually with some form of MRI scan to check for any tumours etc.
      If they all check out it will just be diagnosed as idiopathic tinnitus.
       
    3. fhs
      Fine

      fhs Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Gun range
      Yes there is but there's no sure way to tell with every case. Most of the time the ear has been exposed to loud noises and permanently damaged. Nervous system and cochlea hair cells do not come back. Very rarely is tinnitus caused by brain damage.

      Tinnitus can also happen temporarily due to high aspirin dosage, panic attack, acoustic trauma, medication, etc...
       
    4. GregCA
      Jaded

      GregCA Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Otosclerosis
      I've asked this question many times to my doctors and they keep saying no, but I'm not sure I believe it.
      Why? Because one of the researchers at the BTA measured T with electrodes on a head to demonstrate that you can have hearing loss and yet a perfect audiogram (i.e. "hidden hearing loss"). He demonstrated that there is some amplification process somewhere between one stage and the next in the pipeline that makes a "weak signal" be amplified back to a "normal signal".
      So it seems to me there is a way to measure some signal at different points from the cochlea to the auditory cortex, which could hopefully be a tool to locate T, in absence of an external stimulus.
      Maybe T researchers would answer differently from doctors if they were asked.
       
    5. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      mysterygal

      mysterygal Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear Infection
      Thanks for your responses. Tinnitus has been one of the most difficult things to experience. Made me realize that I need to be more careful with my ears. Ears are delicate and complex, and take too long to heal or recover. Hoping that the tinnitus goes away. I've had it for almost 2 months now.
       
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