Tinnitus Doubled in Volume After 10 Years of Being Habituated

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Stu1983, Jan 27, 2019.

    1. Stu1983
      Studious

      Stu1983 Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Around 2008/spiked Dec 2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      2008 sound?Meds?Not sure/Dec 20 2018 meds doubled the volume
      Hi all

      I'm Stuart I'm 35 years old and I live in Toronto Canada and have had tinnitus with some hearing loss for about 10 years.

      On Dec 8 I started to take Effexor XR daily for insomnia and anxiety issues and also Lorazepam about 3 times a week until the AD kicks in so I can at least get some sleep.

      On Dec 20 my tinnitus doubled in volume, I figured my body was just getting use to the Effexor and kept it up for several more days and then decided to discontinue use.

      My life has been very difficult since and I don't know what to do about this high pitched ringing that I have in my head and could use some advice, support and encouragement.

      Thanks for taking the time to read this.
       
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    2. JoeC100

      JoeC100 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise
      Stu,

      I’m not an expert on what the meds have to do with your spike. I’m replying because I experienced a spike myself, after having tinnitus since 2007. My spike occurred the second week of December. Since the volume got cranked up, I have been paying close attention to my tinnitus. I would say that it easily doubled in volume, and has been bouncing back and forth from left ear to right. Kind of a suck situation.

      So here I am, 6 weeks later. Nothing has changed for me, and I am on my second road to habituation (my spike has been attributed to noise exposure/sinus infection/aging- dealers choice, with such a poor understanding of how tinnitus functions I’m left to guess). I will say with certainty that I am doing a whole lot better than I was 6 weeks ago. I was a wreck for a month, now I’m on to mildly focusing on my tinnitus. It is not as easily masked as before, but I can feel myself getting used to it being my new version of silence.

      My advice, as someone who is on the same path as you (as far as spike and previously habituated) is to start accepting that this could be a new volume for you, and begin coping as you already did once before. Masking, staying busy, slowly drawing focus and obsession away.

      I am 39, and I have begun to accept that I will likely go through a few more spikes in my lifetime. That helped calm me down. As we age, and our hearing deteriorates, tinnitus will be more apparent. But that’s no reason to get down. I have heard back from folks on this forum, and they have all been really kind and comforting.

      Best advice I’ve got is to accept it, and if it gets better then that’s a bonus. Also heard back from folks who have habituated after a spike with permanent increase in volume.

      Hit me back, I’m 39, we seem to have a couple things in common.

      Joe.
       
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    3. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      Normally, one gets tinnitus as a result of losing hearing suddenly (e.g., due to a one-time acoustic trauma). It is my understanding that gradual hearing loss (i.e., what happens during aging) usually doesn't result in tinnitus.
       
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    4. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Stu1983
      Studious

      Stu1983 Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Around 2008/spiked Dec 2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      2008 sound?Meds?Not sure/Dec 20 2018 meds doubled the volume
      Hi Joe and thanks for taking the time to respond and for the advice. Agreed masking and staying busy is key.
      Any issues with sleep?
       
    5. JoeC100

      JoeC100 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise
      Stu,

      Yes and no.

      Sleep has been a weird journey with my tinnitus. When I first got it, I was losing sleep like crazy. Part of the obsession I think. But then sleep became the only time I didn’t think about it/hear it/care about it! This time was the same. I was nervous, anxious, and obsessing once again. I was waking up and the noise in my head was dizzying to me. I broke out my old noise machine, and used that to this point. I’d say I’m good sleeping now. Also been taking 6mg of melatonin and the occasional Benadryl. I work nights (12-8 am). I typically stay up during the day with the kids or work day overtime. My sleep has been 5pm to 11pm with moderate success. On my days off I’ve been sleeping a solid 8-9. Sleep helps me so much. Fatigue has always been a trigger for my tinnitus to be more noticeable.

      Joe.
       
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    6. JoeC100

      JoeC100 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise
      Bill,

      Maybe I wasn’t clear with what I was trying to say. As we lose hearing (the population that has tinnitus as a result of acoustic trauma, such as myself), I had the understanding that as we hear less (less ambient noise recurved by the brain) then T will be more recognizable or more difficult to mask with everyday sounds. Thoughts?

      Joe.
       
    7. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      I don't think this is the case. Few people get to the point of being borderline deaf. As long as one's hearing loss is moderate, one can still get the benefits of masking by just increasing the volume of the sound one wants to use for masking. If one gets T when one is over 60 or 70, aging won't have enough time to make a big difference. If one gets T when one is younger, one can begin protecting one's ears. As a result, hearing loss shouldn't be as dramatic (so I think it is reasonable to hope that if one can take one's mind off of T when one is outside now, it will continue being the case for as long as one doesn't harm one's ears making one's T louder).
       
    8. JoeC100

      JoeC100 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise
      Bill,

      I get what you’re saying. My question is that if thebears have been through trauma, is it not more likely that protection only does so much moving forward? I have always thought of my noise exposure as a younger man as something that would continuously effect my hearing as I age. I guess I’d need some science to back those thoughts up. I am a big supporter of hearing protection since my 20s, I’m hoping that this lessens my likliehood of hearing worsening as time goes on!
       
    9. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      One experiences the worst within months after the trauma (as hair and nerve cells take some time to die). After that, the body tends to heal. Often it can't finish the healing. However, one shouldn't get worse years after the trauma as a result of the trauma. One might get worse as a result of new traumas, or as a result of ear diseases, or aging.
       
    10. Alue
      No Mood

      Alue Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      O' I think it can, but people that get tinnitus through age related hearing loss seem less likely to be bothered by it. Probably because it's onset is very gradual and it's not as severe. I have talked with some older folks that have tinnitus but can't remember when they got it.

      Hearing loss is cumulative, and in some cases I think that last acoustic trauma that causes everything to go wrong is just the straw that breaks the cammel's back.

      That being said, a sudden hearing loss does seem more likely to cause the brain response that results in tinnitus.
       
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    11. Fabrikat

      Fabrikat Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1973
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Otosclerosis then volume then viral infection
      There's a lot of validity to this notion in my opinion. I saw my audiologist last week who told me about seeing an elderly lady who had some severe losses in her hearing, yet felt that she had no problem hearing everything. I suspect people having to raise their voices and repeat words to her would have a different opinion.

      Since the onset was so gradual, her perception of hearing loss was hardly noticeable to her. Yet I'll present with my mild to moderate hearing loss, suddenly onset and feel like my ears have been plugged up with corks. And with loud tinnitus to match.

      When it comes to hearing and tinnitus issues, perception is everything.
       
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