Tongue Numbness and Reduced Sense of Taste Reduced — Associated with Hyperacusis?

Discussion in 'Support' started by Ray552, Apr 13, 2019.

    1. Ray552

      Ray552 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      12/18
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise trauma
      Has anyone had weird symptoms like tongue numbness and reduced taste? Seems like something to do with hyperacusis.
       
    2. Contrast
      No Mood

      Contrast Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      in a better place
      Tinnitus Since:
      late 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise injury
      There is a type of hyperacusis involving the trigeminal nerve, do you have numbness elsewhere in your face? Is it triggered by noise.

      Remember there is no such thing as just "hyperacusis" but rather multiple conditions of sound intolerance that are not medically classified. I had swelling in my face and nose from noise. It's sad this isn't being researched enough.

      See a neurologist, explain your history of loud noise, mention other people have facial numbness from noise on a tinnitus forum. Don't waste time with ENTs unless you know what you are doing.
       
    3. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      Been doing some research since you posted.
      Many patients with hyperacusis will also get facial muscle tension from attempted motion - dysgeusia that will cause tongue numbness and reduced taste perception – Often other reasons for loss of taste and tongue numbness is rarely confirmed by proprioceptive input testing with association to hyperacusis. This is most always a temporary condition when there's hyperacusis.
       
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    4. Contrast
      No Mood

      Contrast Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      in a better place
      Tinnitus Since:
      late 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise injury
      We need not use just the word "hyperacusis" - it's confusing because there are so many things.

      1: Loudness hyperacusis
      2: Pain hyperacusis (noxacusis)
      3: Trigeminal nerve irritability after acoustic injury
       
    5. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Ray552

      Ray552 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      12/18
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise trauma
      Thank you, I really appreciate the input, are there any studies that show how long this lack of taste lasted for those associating it with hyperacusis?
      @Greg Sacramento
       
    6. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Ray552 You have mentioned "I started experiencing numbness all over my body, my whole back, neck, legs, and even my face to the point where I cannot feel normal sensations." "I would also like to add that sound causes pressure on random parts of my face and tightness, what my question basically is whether all the numbness etc. can result from an acoustic trauma or could this be something else?" You also mention your eyes and neck.

      You may have developed a parasympathetic nervous system reaction. Read the second paragraph in link starring with 'Nerve fibres'. Look at the blue highlights including the facial nerve- facial muscle tension that discusses the tongue. The facial nerve associates to taste and numbness and that can cause hyperacusis, but often is temporary to possible associated conditions. Can not say that another condition may have involvement. Your audiogram looks pretty good.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parasympathetic_nervous_system

      There are many things that can cause tongue numbness and loss of taste. Some are radiation therapy or even a CT, antibolitics, certain medications, beta blockers, ace inhibitors, B12 and zinc deficiency, head, neck or facial injury.

      Other causes of loss of taste and tongue numbness are thyroid, oral nerves, toxins, smoking, gingivitis, dental surgery or reaction from numbing agents, denial hygiene, mouth bacteria, salvia gland infections, GERD or stomach acid, allergies, sinusitus, Pharyngitis, nasal polyps, cold or flu, drinking or eating something real hot or cold.
       
      Last edited: Apr 13, 2019
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