Two Studies to Follow for Those with Possible TMJ Related Tinnitus

Discussion in 'Research News' started by EarHair, May 29, 2018.

    1. EarHair

      EarHair Member

      Location:
      Vancouver, Canada
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2012 worsened Jan 2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Concerts and TMJ and genetics (Mom, Grandpa have it)
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    2. Contrast

      Contrast Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Retrovile
      Tinnitus Since:
      late 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      injury from noxious noise
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    3. Mathew Gould

      Mathew Gould Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      6/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Neck/Jaw misalignment
    4. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      EarHair

      EarHair Member

      Location:
      Vancouver, Canada
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2012 worsened Jan 2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Concerts and TMJ and genetics (Mom, Grandpa have it)
      Yeah I assume it wraps up this year. I believe the theory is that if TMJ disorder is causing your tinnitus, you get jaw physio and massage to loosen the muscles. Because for some reason the muscle tension and misalignment is putting pressure on the ear and the ear nerves. So the theory is if you relieve that, your relieve the tinnitus. We will see...

      Many physiotherapy places already offer TMJ disorder massage and stretches, exercises so you can go experiment on yourself if you want. Just be careful because I have heard mention of a masseuse or a chiro going crazy on someones jaw, then that inflames it more and the tinnitus got worse.
       
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    5. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Tinnitus as a comorbidity to temporomandibular disorders − a systematic review
      https://doi.org/10.1111/joor.12710
      This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1111/joor.12710

      Abstract
      The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the prevalence of tinnitus in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and the possible effects of TMD treatment on tinnitus symptoms. A search of the PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases from inception of each database up to January 2017 found 222 articles. After independent screening of abstracts by two of the authors, we assessed 46 articles in full text. The inclusion and exclusion criteria reduced these to 25 articles of which 22 studies reported prevalence based on 13,358 patients and 33,876 controls, and eight studies reported effect of TMD treatment on tinnitus based on 536 patients and 18 controls. The prevalence of tinnitus in patients with TMD varied from 3.7% to 70% (median 42.3%) whereas the prevalence in control groups without TMD varied between 1.7% and 26% (median 12%). The eight treatment studies, indicated that treatment of TMD symptoms may have a beneficial effect on severity of tinnitus. However, only one treatment study included a control group, meaning that the overall level of evidence is low. The finding that tinnitus is more common in patients with TMD means that it can be regarded as a comorbidity to TMD. However, in view of the lack of evidence currently available, further well‐designed and randomized studies with control groups are needed to investigate whether possible mechanisms common to tinnitus and TMD do exist and whether TMD treatment can be justified to try to alleviate tinnitus in patients with TMD and comorbidity of tinnitus.

      This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

      Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/joor.12710
       
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    6. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Is there a higher prevalence of tinnitus in patients with temporomandibular disorders? A systematic review and meta‐analysis
      https://doi.org/10.1111/joor.12706
      This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1111/joor.12706

      Abstract

      The aim of this study was to determine if there exists a higher prevalence of tinnitus in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) than in patients without TMDs. A systematic review was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE for articles published between January 1992 and April 2018 in accordance with the PRISMA statement. Studies were included in this review only if they assessed TMDs using the research diagnostic criteria (RDC)/TMD or DC/TMD. A total of five studies were included in the systematic review, and a random effects meta‐analysis of three of the studies was conducted. In all of the selected studies, the prevalence of tinnitus was higher in patients with TMDs (35.8% to 60.7%) than in patients without TMDs (9.7% to 26.0%). The odds ratio of suffering from tinnitus among patients with TMDs was 4.45 (95% CI 1.64‐12.11. P=0.003). Thus, despite the limitations of the included studies, this review demonstrates that the prevalence of tinnitus in TMD patients is significantly higher than that in patients without TMD.

      This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

      Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/joor.12706
       
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    7. Candy

      Candy Member Benefactor Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unidentified

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