Had Tinnitus for 3 Years — Spike at Club Last Night. Should I See ENT for Prednisone?

Discussion in 'Support' started by Please Help, Mar 24, 2019.

    1. Please Help

      Please Help Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Neomyc
      I wore good quality earplugs (Alpine PartyPlug Pro) when I went out but I was at the club for a good 4-5 hours and noise level was around 110-115 dB. Combined w drinking alcohol, I had a significant spike last night into the morning that has finally calmed down.

      Although my spike is gone and I appear to be back to my baseline lev, I am concerned that being exposed to loud noise that long even earplug protection may have caused permanent hearing damage. Normally I use NAC before going out and after, but this Time didn’t have NAC before hand and only took NAC the day after. I supplemented with vitamin E and magnesium to try and limit the damage.

      Question is - should I go to an ENT tomorrow and try to get a prescription to prednisone or should I just stick with my NAC / Magnesium / Vitamjne E over the counter plan? Please let me know, again my spike calmed down and it’s back to baseline, and I’ve had tinnitus for 3 years and have mostly gotten used to it but just want to know whether I need a prednisone prescription to make sure permanent damage is kept in check.
       
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    2. fishbone
      Shitfaced

      fishbone Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      1988
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      loud noise and very bad sickness
      If I was worried that my hearing was damaged, i'd go see an audiologist and see if it was damaged or not. You are free to do what you want to do....
       
    3. Jcb
      No Mood

      Jcb Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      December 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      possible TMJ, came on after severe cold and chest infection,
      Personally I would just keep up with the magnesium and vitamins, if you are worried about your hearing maybe get a hearing test just to put your mind at rest. The fact the spike went down is a good sign, maybe ease off the clubs for a while and give your ears a rest. I miss clubs man but doubt I would step foot in one ever again due to the noise levels, for me it’s not worth the risk.
       
    4. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      Audiologists can't test for hidden hearing loss. Also, most people on this forum don't have any hearing loss (and yet have tinnitus and get tinnitus spikes).
      Prednisone carries risks. Not doing anything is also risky. Your guess about what to do is as good as anyone's (on this forum, or a an ENT guessing).

      At least your spike is gone - that's probably a very good sign. If you ignore the fact that earplugs can provide a false sense of security, eventually you might run out of luck.
       
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    5. Jack Straw
      Balanced

      Jack Straw Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      1990s
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Infection, Acoustic Trauma
      @Please Help you are very lucky that your spike went back to baseline. You seemed to have gotten very lucky. Please be careful in the future and make sure you know your ear plugs NRR when going to a venue. Being at a loud venue for too long even with ear plugs can still be unsafe.

      The plugs he used were 20 dB protection. Lets assume it was 115 dB in the club and at best he got was 15 dB protection. This would mean that he was exposing himself to 100 dB. The exposure time on 100 dB from NIOSH standards (stricter than OSHA) is 15 min. If he was in the club for 4-5 hours he well exceeded the safety limit. This doesn't mean ear plugs don't work. It means that ear plugs when used improperly don't work.

      If you are saying, "When ear plugs are used improperly they don't provide adequate protections and can also provide a false sense of security", than I agree with you. People need to be educated that NRR, dB levels and time limits need to be taken into account when exposing themselves to loud noises. They work if the proper dB level and time limit exposure are within safe levels (subjective).
       
      • Agree Agree x 3
    6. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      There are plenty of examples on this forum of people being exposed to the kinds of sounds that are WELL below those guidelines (that were designed for the healthy people) and ending up with permanent spikes.

      For example
      He was talking about:
      No, I am saying that when you use properly inserted earplugs and are something like 10-20 dB below those guidelines, there is still a non-negligible risk that you will develop a permanent T spike (in volume) or a permanent new T tone.
       
      • Agree Agree x 2
    7. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Please Help

      Please Help Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Neomyc
      @Jack Straw thank you for the insight - I will be far more careful moving forward.

      As for earplugs, do you know where you get the 20 dB reduction number for alpine partyplug pro? I haven’t been able to find this number on the internet. Are there earplugs that provide even larger decibel protection? Where can I find those and how much additional dB protection do they provide? I will make sure not to visit nightclubs in the near future, but if I’m in a situation where there are loud sounds it would be nice to know I have earplugs with additional hearing protection.
       
    8. Contrast

      Contrast Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Retrovile
      Tinnitus Since:
      late 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      injury from noxious noise
      .

      entma18-plack_fig-2-new-png.png
       
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    9. Ed209

      Ed209 Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2015
      You took a big risk going to a club for 4 - 5 hours with just the protection of Alpine party plugs. 110 dB - 115 dB seems incredibly loud for a nightclub, and I have no idea if your measurement was accurate or not, but assuming it was, that puts you at circa 95 dB for 5 hours which is not good for your ears at all.

      I’m really glad to hear that your spike subsided but you’re playing with fire at those levels with such little protection.

      Nightclubs are usually between 90 dB - 95 dB on average, so wherever you were, it was louder than a typical rock concert.
       

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