Hearing-Loss-Prevention Drugs Closer to Reality Thanks to New Test

Discussion in 'Research News' started by erik, Jan 25, 2013.

    1. erik
      Cool

      erik Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012 or earlier?
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      Jan. 17, 2013 — A new way to test anti-hearing-loss drugs in people could help land those medicines on pharmacy shelves sooner. University of Florida researchers have figured out the longstanding problem of how to safely create temporary, reversible hearing loss in order to see how well the drugs work. The findings are described in the November/December 2012 issue of the journal Ear & Hearing.

      "There's a real need for drug solutions to hearing loss," said lead investigator Colleen Le Prell, an associate professor in the department of speech, language, and hearing sciences at the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions. "Right now the only options for protecting against noise-induced hearing loss are to turn down what you're listening to, walk away from it or wear ear plugs, and those options may not be practical for everyone, particularly for those in the military who need to be able to hear threats."

      About 26 million American adults have noise-induced hearing loss, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Prevention is key because damage to hearing-related hair cells in the inner ear by loud noise is irreversible. Though hearing aids can help amplify sound and implanted devices can restore some sensation of sound for those with more profound hearing loss, they do not restore normal hearing. Thus, researchers are trying to find drugs that prevent hearing damage in the first place.

      Although prototype drugs have prevented noise-induced hearing loss in laboratory animals, it has been hard to know whether the same protection is possible in humans, largely because researchers lacked an effective method for the needed tests. Those tests are now achievable because of the UF efforts. The work brings scientists closer to the development of drugs that could help protect people at risk of hearing damage -- from rock concert goers to factory workers and military personnel who are routinely exposed to noise as they work.

      Le Prell's model is the first to use controlled music levels to reliably cause low-level, temporary hearing loss in human participants. Other studies have used beeps or tones, user-selected music levels, or music exposures that don't result in temporary hearing loss. Three monitoring boards ensured that studies of the UF model met national safety standards for research in humans. Co-investigator Dr. Patrick Antonelli, the George T. Singleton Professor and chair of the UF department of otolaryngology, provided onsite supervision of study participant safety, and collaborators at the University of Michigan and Southern Illinois University were involved in study design and safety discussions.

      "Dr. Le Prell started with a unique idea to create a reversible noise-induced hearing loss and has established solid groundwork for this new model in the use of clinical drug testing," said hearing expert Jianxin Bao, an associate professor of otolaryngology and biology and biomedical sciences at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, who was not involved in the UF study. "As for every new model, several unknown factors exist for this elegant experiment model, which requires further detailed studies."

      To induce temporary hearing loss, study participants listened to rock or pop music on a digital music player via headphones for four hours at sound levels ranging from 93 decibels -- the noise level of a power lawn mower -- to 102 decibels, the noise of a jackhammer. Each participant got a hearing test four times, 15 minutes to three-and-a-quarter hours after his or her listening session, as well as follow-up tests one day and one week later. Fifteen minutes after the music stopped, those who listened to the highest music levels had lost just a small amount of hearing -- six decibels, on average. Hearing returned to normal within three hours.

      Le Prell's group will use this testing model in two first-of-a-kind clinical trials of therapeutics designed to determine if noise-induced hearing loss can be prevented in humans. The first study uses a dietary supplement called Soundbites, manufactured by Hearing Health Science, a University of Michigan bioscience spinoff company. Soundbites contains the vitamin A precursor beta carotene, vitamins C and E and the mineral magnesium. This antioxidant formula, the patent for which Le Prell shares, has prevented temporary and permanent hearing loss in laboratory animals.

      In the other ongoing study, participants take a drug called SPI-1005 produced by Sound Pharmaceuticals Inc. The test capsule contains a new molecule called ebselen that mimics a protective inner ear protein.

      The Food and Drug Administration will monitor the studies to ensure openness, analytical rigor and participant safety as the researchers try to get badly needed drugs onto the market.

      "We really want to find out what's going to work and we want to make it possible for strategies that do work to get in the hands of the people who need them," Le Prell said.
       
    2. Louise

      Louise Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Yorkshire, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      29/06/2012 worsened Jan 2017 & Dec 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise exposure
      This is good, but again it's for prevention. Wish they'd come up with something to fix it once the damage is done.
       
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    3. Autumnly
      Wishful

      Autumnly Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      2013
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise-induced
      NIH awards researcher $972,613 for his drug research aimed at treating & preventing tinnitus

      Jianxin Bao, researcher and professor of anatomy and neurobiology at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), received a federal grant to support further research and development of the prevention and treatment of tinnitus, a disruptive hearing impairment marked by the perception of ringing or buzzing in one or both ears.

      The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant — which comes from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, a division of the National Institutes of Health — provides $972,613 for Bao's efforts to produce the first human treatment for tinnitus, which impacts one in 10 American adults and is the No. 1 disability reported by veterans, according to a news release. About 1.5 million U.S. veterans receive disability benefits for tinnitus, which currently has no available treatment.

      Subject to availability of funds and satisfactory progress on the project, Bao could receive a second year of cost support with a recommended amount of $1,207,345, according to the release.

      "This generous government support will allow us to continue working toward finding the first drug treatment for tinnitus, which is a major health issue for millions of people — including the military personnel who so bravely serve our country," said Bao, who will serve as principal investigator, in a provided statement.

      He aims to develop a drug to treat and prevent the impairment.

      The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), a division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), calls occupational hearing loss the most common work-related injury in the U.S., with an estimated $242 million spent annually on worker's compensation for hearing loss disability, according to the release.

      "Millions of people in the United States live with tinnitus and noise-induced hearing loss every day, so I am pleased to see this federal investment in research and development that can improve the lives of so many people," U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Youngstown, said in a statement announcing the award.
       
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    4. Contrast
      No Mood

      Contrast Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Clown World
      Tinnitus Since:
      late 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise injury
      • Agree Agree x 1
    5. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      I guess this amount would be for pre clinical research and not clinical trial stage development as that would take many millions.
       
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    6. FGG
      No Mood

      FGG Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Multi-factorial
      Jianxin Bao is the CEO/founder of Gateway Biotechnology (unless it's a coincidence and they share the same name). Wonder if/how this ties into to what they are doing.
       
    7. tommyd87

      tommyd87 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1999
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      tmj music
      This tends to be why I think that suddenly there is a lot of investment, research and trials going into it. I know that this stuff has been worked on for a considerable number of years now and actually we are seeing the results from the post research and manufacture stage. Firms are fully focused on developing and producing something that will provide relevant improvements in the near future for this.

      The economic argument is actually a two part part catalyst for this though. One part is the economic loss factor and the desire to overcome that but also actually it is also about economic gain as entities producing these drugs do know that they can be pretty profitable. This is especially as when you look at the value of the current treatment that's available and already know that they would be able to charge similarly for repair treatment.

      The science part particularly seems to be largely sorted so shall be up to now just getting the delivery and treatment organised.
       
    8. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
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    9. TuxedoCat
      No Mood

      TuxedoCat Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Advocate

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      high frequency hearing loss
      Dr. Bao/Gateway Biotechnology, Inc. has received a large grant from NIDCD to develop a drug to cure tinnitus. Read about it HERE.

      "Gateway Biotechnology, Inc., has been awarded a Small Business Innovation Research Grant (SBIR) grant of $972,613 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders (a division of the National Institutes of Health) for further research and development on tinnitus prevention and treatment. A second year of cost support, subject to the availability of funds and satisfactory progress of the project, was recommended in the amount of $1,207,345."

      If you know or find anything about this researcher's work, please share.

      Many thanks, TC
       
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    10. WillBeNimble
      Buzzed

      WillBeNimble Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Location:
      Ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Damage from earphones
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    11. FGG
      No Mood

      FGG Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Multi-factorial
      • Good Question Good Question x 1
    12. Christiaan
      Vegged out

      Christiaan Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Location:
      The Hague, the Netherlands
      Tinnitus Since:
      2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Bloody headphones in 2016,worsened in 2020
      They've mentioned both prevention & treatment. In the latter case, I wonder how much effect this GW-201 would entail for chronic cases. Unfortunately, I cannot find any research paper or reference on the website that tells a little bit about how GW-201 could treat tinnitus.
       
    13. TuxedoCat
      No Mood

      TuxedoCat Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Advocate

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      high frequency hearing loss
      There's nothing on SIBR or NIDCD's websites about the new grant. It could be that the additional grant money is to move up the tinnitus research. I think we need more info.
       
      • Good Question Good Question x 1
    14. UHPTS
      Wishful

      UHPTS Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      October 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection
      Could somebody write them on behalf of Tinnitus Talk?
       
    15. TuxedoCat
      No Mood

      TuxedoCat Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Ambassador Advocate

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      high frequency hearing loss
      If done on behalf of Tinnitus Talk, I think that would be @Markku or @Hazel's call. The announcement is on the Northeast Ohio Medical University's website, but Bao's company Gateway Biotechnology is mentioned.
       
    16. sssing

      sssing Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      cold
      From what I read, I think it seems to be working on calcium channel blockers... it is for acute cases or prevention mainly. When these calcium channel blockers are administered prior to cochlear damage they preserve hair cells. After the injury, these calcium channel blockers also do the same thing. So far no mention about it treating chronic cases.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1903349/
       
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    17. WillBeNimble
      Buzzed

      WillBeNimble Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Location:
      Ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Damage from earphones
      So we could maybe pause our damage. That would be nice too, until FX-322 comes out.
       
    18. sssing

      sssing Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      cold
      I’m sorry to pour cold water (I really hope I’m wrong), it’s mainly tested to work well on acute cases and for prevention.
       
    19. WillBeNimble
      Buzzed

      WillBeNimble Member Podcast Patron Benefactor

      Location:
      Ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Damage from earphones
      Oh, I know it won't help at this point. The freeze was meant to refer to the preventative part. If we prevent more damage and hair cell death, we're able to do more when regeneration comes out.
       
    20. sssing

      sssing Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      cold
      Yes, we could prevent more harm being done.
       

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