Sleep Strategies for Tinnitus Related Sleep Problems

Discussion in 'Support' started by Jim, Mar 6, 2011.

    1. bobvann
      Vegged out

      bobvann Member

      Location:
      Inside the vortex
      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud shit
      It's the same with drumming. I would get a reaction in spite of double protection...
       
    2. Mitch
      Surrender

      Mitch Member

      Location:
      Ontario, CA
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2013
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Nightclubs
      Just wanted to share what I use to help me sleep. Right beside my bed I have a Honeywell HFD110 QuietClean Air Purifier. I've used it every night for years and now I can't sleep without it. It makes a calm white noise and also the cool breeze feels nice on my face. Not sure how effective it is at actually purifying the air in my room, but it works great as a white noise maker! Also it has been super reliable considering how many hours it has run for.
       
    3. Johan001

      Johan001 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Medication
      Hi all,

      I have a severe tinnitus in my right ear, which gets extremely loud when trying to sleep. It spunds like a hissing with cricket sounds. I can't sleep almost at all and masking doesn't seem to help me - I tried various sound types.

      I got amytriptiline 10mg prescribed, but it doesn't seem to help with this.

      I'm desperate for help. What strategy can you advise?

      Many thanks!
       
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    4. Drewski
      Approved

      Drewski Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      27/6/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Can someone please shed light on best masking practice for sleep?

      I use a pink noise app and have it under my pillow. My ENT said this is ok. It’s not up loud at all, just enough to compete with the tinnitus. I sleep on my side and the Pink noise resonates through the pillow.
      Got a feeling this is irritating things and fear it could lead to increased base level.

      Can someone please give a brief summary what would be best suggested?

      Thanks.
       
    5. Aravind Pillai
      Probing

      Aravind Pillai Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I use an app called 'Relief' and keep it to the right side Ear where i have the T. I do try to keep it at low level.
       
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    6. Poseidon65

      Poseidon65 Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      1/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      A loud live music show
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    7. Thuan

      Thuan Member

      Location:
      California
      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection right ear 2018. Sound trauma left ear 2020.
      I personally have variable tinnitus when some days are extremely loud and unmaskable and some days when it's not so loud that it's maskable.

      If your sounds are easily maskable, then I would suggest you do some natural remedy like opening all windows for natural background noise. If not because it's too cold, then add in some appliance noise like a fan or if you have a noisy mini refrigerator it would be good too. I also add in a mechanical clock just for some extra noise I can focus on while trying to sleep.

      If it's too loud or near unmaskable, then I would suggest the above posts. I personally use Beltone Tinnitus Calmer where it allows me to mix different natural sounds together. For really unmaskable sounds, I use brown noise or pink noise like you... Sometimes I use neuro modulation sounds. There are several on YouTube but you can find one on this website and choose "Sequen" tone: http://www.generalfuzz.net/acrn/
       
    8. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      @Drewski

      Most Audiologists and Hearing Therapists advise tinnitus patients not to mask tinnitus. This idea is outdated and not a good thing to do. As soon as the masking sound is removed or stopped the brain will immediately focus on the tinnitus and often it will appear to be louder and more intrusive. The preferred method is to use "sound enrichment". One can use whatever sound of choice they prefer but set the level slightly below the tinnitus. In other words the tinnitus should be heard above the sound enrichment, and in doing so the brain over time will learn to habituate to it.

      Masking the tinnitus or covering it up so it can't be heard the brain will never learn to habituate to it. Nature sounds are considered by many to be the best sound enrichment to use at night in preference to using music. Music draws attention to itself and therefore not ideal for people with tinnitus to use at night. Music or nature sounds are ideal for low level sound enrichment during the day but again, set at a level slightly below the tinnitus and not masking it.

      There are many sound machines on the market but Sound Oasis sound machines, are made specifically for people with tinnitus. They can be plugged into a pillow speaker via an audio-output jack. Model S-650 is popular and the one I often recommend. I also have the S-850 travel version that has 18 onboard sounds. I have the S-5000 their top model, over 120 sound combinations can be selected and it's fitted with an FM radio. Although it mains and battery operated, this unit must be plugged into an electric wall socket to work. The other models can be mains or battery operated.

      Michael

      PS: Sound enrichment should be played continuously through the night until morning. The brain and auditory system never switch off. Therefore, it is not a good idea for someone with tinnitus to sleep in a quiet room although some people prefer it. When the brain hears silence particularly at night it has the ability to increase its background activity, in doing so it will also increase the tinnitus which often makes it louder during waking hours. When the brain and auditory system is supplied with sound enrichment at night, this helps keep brain activity suppressed and over time the tinnitus is slowly pushed further into the background which assists with habituation. Sound enrichment also helps with desensitising the auditory system (hyperacusis) making it less sensitive to sound.
       
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    9. morgothaod

      morgothaod Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/2009
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection
      The past few nights I have been sleeping better and all I did was turn on the oscillating function of my fan. Prior to that for about 11 years, I locked the fan in place.

      I guess having the volume of the fan fluctuate from lower to higher as it turns, helps distract me from my tinnitus better.

      I hope this can help someone else!
       
    10. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Advocate

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Noise as a sleep aid: A systematic review

      Summary

      White noise is purported to mask disruptive noises in the bedroom environment and be a non-pharmacological approach for promoting sleep and improving sleep quality. We conducted a systematic review of all studies examining the relationships between continuous white noise or similar broadband noise and sleep (PROSPERO 2020: CRD42020148736). Animal studies and studies using intermittent white noise to disrupt sleep or enhance slow wave activity were excluded. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts of articles from three databases and assessed risk of bias for the 38 included articles. The primary outcomes described sleep onset latency, sleep fragmentation, sleep quality, and sleep and wake duration. There was heterogeneity in noise characteristics, sleep measurement methodology, adherence to the intervention, control group conditions or interventions, and presence of simultaneous experimental interventions. There was perhaps resultantly variability in research findings, with the extremes being that continuous noise improves or disrupts sleep. Following the GRADE criteria, the quality of evidence for continuous noise improving sleep was very low, which contradicts its widespread use. Additional research with objective sleep measures and detailed descriptions of noise exposure is needed before promoting continuous noise as a sleep aid, especially since it may also negatively affect sleep and hearing.
       

      Attached Files:

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    11. Frédéric

      Frédéric Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Advocate

      Location:
      Marseille, France
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/19/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic trauma
      Individualized Treatment of Tinnitus during Sleep Using Combined Tinnitus Signal and Music

      Introduction: Tinnitus is a widely seen otological symptom that interferes with daily activities and causes discomfort. Tinnitus treatments can be classified into 4 main groups: pharmacological treatments, cognitive and behavioral therapy, psychological treatments, and combined treatment approaches made up of at least 2 of these 3 treatment methods.

      Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether it would be possible to develop an individualized treatment method of tinnitus by application of a combined tinnitus signal and music during sleep.

      Methods: Forty-three ears of 30 patients who had subjective tinnitus were included. The patients were evaluated using Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Visual Analogue Scale, and Beck Depression Inventory. The psychoacoustic parameters of tinnitus, such as tinnitus frequency and loudness, and minimal masking levels, were determined. The patients were asked to select musical melodies that they liked. The tinnitus frequency of each patient was taken as the central frequency according to ANSI 2004. All sound files were prepared as stereo channels, with 16-bit resolution and 44,100 Hz sampling rate. The root mean square power value of the music and the band noise’s average root mean square power value were equalized with the “Amplification” command, and 70% of the music and 30% of wide/narrow-band noise were mixed as a stereo channel by the “Mix Paste” command. The patients were instructed to listen to that individualized music/narrow-band noise (tinnitus signal) for 2 h during sleep for a duration of 6 months.

      Results: Tinnitus frequencies of the patients measured prior to treatment and at the second, fourth, and sixth months of follow-up were not significantly different. A statistically significant decrease was seen in tinnitus loudness, minimal masking levels, and residual inhibition during the follow-up. Tinnitus Handicap Inventory scores decreased significantly during follow-up, and the number of patients who complained of tinnitus decreased (p < 0.05). The Visual Analogue Scale scores significantly decreased during follow-up (p < 0.05). Beck Depression Inventory scores decreased significantly during follow-up (p < 0.05).

      Conclusion: Stimulation of the auditory and limbic systems during sleep by the tinnitus signal combined with individualized musical melodies seems an alternative, effective, and cheap method in the treatment of tinnitus.

      Source: https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/509981
       
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    12. Drachen
      Tired

      Drachen Member

      Location:
      United States
      Tinnitus Since:
      December 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Currently unknown; likely noise-induced
      Sleep is important. If anyone here didn't know that before their onset, I'm sure they do now. Unfortunately, while having to endure some of the symptoms discussed on this board, sleep can be very hard to come by. Many have stated that the first step in managing your recovery is to get your sleep on track. This is something I would love to do, but it has been particularly volatile the last couple weeks.

      I have read several posts and threads about sleep, and almost everyone has a different case and potential slew of issues. With this thread, I hope I can gauge a more up-to-date version of how sleep is addressed, what people do to improve their sleep, and how I might be able to solve my current issue with it.

      The Problem
      Before this all began, I already had some issues with insomnia to varying degrees. However, my issue at the time was mostly that of getting to sleep, as I would very frequently manage to sleep upwards of 10 hours or more. Now, things have changed. While getting to sleep can be a problem, the masking and supplements I am taking tend to help me along the way. The issue is that the ensuing sleep does not last for long enough, nor does it really result in restful sleep that helps me through the next day.

      My evenings have a tendency to follow this pattern of sleeping for a small chunk at first, typically anywhere between 3 and 5 hours, and then having to struggle back and forth to sleep afterwards. Below is an image from my daily record involving my estimated amount of sleep. Anything after a "+" sign indicates the approximate total amount of sleep I recovered from the intermittent back-and-forth.

      EXCEL-y-Zw8n5q-UBM.png

      What I don't understand is why I am having these very short times in which I am asleep, only to then be pulled right back into wakefulness. I might have had nights here and there peppered throughout the year before, but I've never had it almost consistently every night!

      Furthermore, I typically even experience dreams in these little bits of sleep, which is confusing to me since I thought one had to be well into the sleep cycle to experience those. Perhaps this is an important bit of information?

      Possible Solutions?
      In terms of sleep aids, I have been keeping consistent with Melatonin (1 mg) for the past few days. I am also taking Magnesium Glycinate around the late evening as that seems to be when it is recommended most. Throughout the day, though typically closer to the evening as well, I will drink Chamomile tea. I am considering trying Passionflower as well.

      It has been recommended that you also go to sleep and get up at roughly the same time. I actually have been doing this for a while now.

      After experiencing a spike the day after taking a single Amitriptyline (25 mg), I am currently skeptical of trying antidepressants as a sleep aid. I am further scared by the prospect of taking benzos for a variety of reasons. If possible, I would like to avoid using medication to get through this, but I am still open to hearing thoughts here as to what solutions may be safe.

      The one thing I know I have yet to do is exercise. Exercise seems to be the ubiquitous answer for sleep problems. However, I was getting the same amount of exercise as I was before this all began, and my sleep is much worse now.

      I am curious to hear from anyone who might have had cases similar to mine in which their sleep is so oddly broken. Does anyone have any theories for why my sleep is presenting in this form specifically? What sort of ideas do you have that might help the situation?
       
    13. jimmiii

      jimmiii Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unkown
      A lot of things have contributed for my sleep to worsen over the years (Alcohol, Substances, etc). But now I am free from pretty much everything except for stress.

      My sleep always is in a kind of active dreaming state. I get more than 8 hours of sleep usually but it when I wake up it doesn't feel like it was a good rested sleep. Usually I go to bed past midnight but I am starting to go to bed before midnight and also have thought about waking up early.

      Any tips on getting complete deep rested sleep?
       
    14. linearb
      Psychedelic

      linearb Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      beliefs are makyo and reality ignores them
      Tinnitus Since:
      1999
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      karma
      I just stopped caring if I sleep or not. If I am stuck awake late at night, I go work or play video games. If I am super tired during the day, okay, eventually I will sleep.

      Once I got over my basic, gnawing anxiety about "not sleeping", all kinds of things got massively easier. Sleep, no sleep, whatever, it's not going to kill me, and I have powered through enough work days on 2 hours of sleep in the last 48 hours, to be pretty confident I could do that indefinitely. I've also been through the cycle of sleeping ~1 hour a night for periods, to know that it won't kill me, it's not dangerous, it's a fundamentally a minor inconvenience that only seems like a horrible unbeatable monster if I let it. I will never die of insomnia, I will never be brain damaged, the human organism is real good at getting the bare minimum sleep it needs to be somewhat homeostatic.

      It's the epitome of a paper tiger. You can also beat it into a bush pretty effectively with THC if you are so inclined ;)
       
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    15. linearb
      Psychedelic

      linearb Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      beliefs are makyo and reality ignores them
      Tinnitus Since:
      1999
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      karma
      No, but if you're able to be somewhat lucid I would super encourage you to read this book and attempt to put the practices into effect, because even if you totally dismiss all the theological underpinnings as religious mumbo jumbo, I can basically guarantee that the practices themselves will lead you to some really interesting experiences, as well as, probably, helping you sleep better, over a long period of time.

      I worked through about the first half of this during my most insane tinnitus-insomnia-lucid phase:

      https://www.pdfdrive.com/the-tibetan-yogas-of-dream-and-sleep-d156937313.html (you can download as a PDF -- or get on Amazon for $14).
      As I have moved into my late 30s I've basically become fully biphasic: I tend to fall asleep at some point between 10pm and 1am depending on what I am doing, then be fully awake again 3-5, then sleep for a couple more hours.

      I've more or less just embraced this -- in fact, this book makes a strong case based on historical evidence that biphasic sleep was the norm until the advent of the electric light.

      When I used to worry about not sleeping, my sleep was worse, my days were filled with anxiety about sleep, and this fed my insomnia. When months of protracted and fairly extreme insomnia forced me to learn to just go about my daily tasks feeling incredibly drained, I learned that I was able to do so much better than I would have expected. This has led me to a lot less anxiety about not sleeping, even if I still often do not sleep especially well.

      Basically, the human body is not going to fall apart from lack of sleep. Protracted stress and anxiety states are not good for you, but the body is resilient and can to some degree shrug off a lot of this after some period of recovery.

      Worrying about sleep is a path to misery and insomnia; surrendering to insomnia, for me, was a path to better sleep overall, and not being "worried" about it when I can't sleep. Some nights I won't sleep well, or at all, and I will feel shitty the next day(s). If this goes on for long enough, I feel shittier and shittier, but because I trust my body to know where the breaking point is, I also trust that eventually I'll feel "rested".

      And, eventually, so far, I always do ;)
       
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    16. Drachen
      Tired

      Drachen Member

      Location:
      United States
      Tinnitus Since:
      December 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Currently unknown; likely noise-induced
      This all is incredibly interesting. I wasn't aware that biphasic (or even polyphasic) sleep was a thing, but it's somewhat comforting to know this is just how it goes for some people, and it doesn't necessarily mean that they will suffer damage from it.

      Because, that is absolutely my worry. I have heard for years and years how important sleep is to the body, but as I have been chronically insomniac, this has always been an added source of stress and anxiety in addition to everything else. What I mostly don't understand is why this is a problem all of the sudden, because prior to my onset, my sleep was I suppose what you'd consider monophasic.

      I do not disagree with your last path at all, and that is one of the most frustrating things when it comes to negative behaviors and thinking: they compound and feed off each other to feed this seemingly never-ending cycle of despair. I have not yet managed to break this cycle. I wish it were just as easy as commanding your body to behave a certain way, but with this whole ordeal I have became frighteningly aware of how separate your conscious mind is from your physical brain.

      I am glad to hear that you have managed to find some sort of pattern that allows you to adjust to the inconsistency and uncertainty of your sleep patterns. I'm not sure what I have in store for me in the future, but I'd really like to improve in this respect as well.

      Also, that book you linked comes off as very intriguing to me, and I might pick it up when I figure out how to read books comfortably again.
       
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    17. linearb
      Psychedelic

      linearb Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      beliefs are makyo and reality ignores them
      Tinnitus Since:
      1999
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      karma
      I took "falling asleep at the same time as my kid" to a new extreme today and took an accidental nap from 4-7, so goodness knows what will happen tonight. Maybe I'm just awake for the day now, ha (it's 8pm).

      My body kind of sleeps when it wants to, and I am along for the ride.
       
    18. MindOverMatter

      MindOverMatter Member

      Location:
      Norway
      Tinnitus Since:
      2004/05
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown (possibly stress related, and later sound induced)
      Good sleep routines is vital, no doubt. What works for me is:

      1. Same routine every day, as far as possible.

      2. Be really tired when you go to sleep.

      3. Ref. 2 - you will be tired, eventually, when you follow the same cycle of sleep and your body adapts to it. Going to bed and waking up at the same time every day is important to me. And not dozing off in bed.

      4. Use sound enrichment if needed/if you find it soothing.

      5. Keep your bedroom dark, and ONLY use it for sleep (and sex). Your mind will associate the room with sleep.

      6. If you do not fall asleep within 20 minutes, sleep experts will tell you to get out of bed and wait to get back until you feel tired again. This one is hard, but sometimes needed if you are to brake a bad cycle of sleep deprivation.

      7. Do not make it a habit of using electronic devices that emits a lot of blue light before bed. Better off reading a book, or meditate/relax before dozing off. I recommend night filter on your screen in the evening if you have a hard time to sleep.

      8. Personally I always keep the lights in the bathroom all dimmed down before going to bed.

      9. Try to be a little bit physical during the day, and get sunlight if possible.

      10. If you eat a meal after dinner, choose something that will keep your blood sugar stable - f.ex. oatmeal with low-fat milk, cinnamon and banana. Lots of B-vitamins and magnesium ++ naturally. Stay away from caffeine.

      11. For remedies, if needed, I would recommend Holy Basil Extract (Tulsi) for calming down/lower your cortisol. It helped me a lot after experiencing insomnia for more than 2 weeks with hardly any sleep. If you need something extra to get your circadian rhythm back on track, Melatonin supplement might help as well.
       
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    19. Keith D Mitchell
      Alone

      Keith D Mitchell Member

      Location:
      Claymont, Delaware, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      10/20/2015
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      No Idea
      Despite living with tinnitus in my right ear for 7 years, I'm at a loss now. It feels like it's getting worse and has really impacted my sleep. The past week has been an episode of me trying to sleep, falling asleep, waking up, and crying. Only for my loving wifey to hold me and try to settle me down.

      I really feel that part of this is the Prednisone that I'm taking, but I also took this late 2020 and I was fine. Now with the lack of sleep, it feels my tinnitus has gotten louder, I'm stressing out and the cycle repeats. It doesn't help that I believe I have ETD due to clicking in my right ear around certain sounds when I walk and my ear is constantly leaking clear liquid. Waiting for an allergy test that's 2 weeks out before my ENT will give me any Amoxicillin, but it may be too late.

      I've been reading on what people use and take to fall asleep, but there are so many threads. I just want one damned 8-hour sleep session. Something I haven't had in a very long long time.
       
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    20. Jeff Bannister

      Jeff Bannister Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      25/12/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Hi,

      I wanted to start sharing things that have helped me in the past just in case they help someone else. When I first developed tinnitus I couldn't get any sleep and obviously this makes every worse as you can imagine. I figured the first thing I need to do was figure out how to sleep and it would help me during the day having had a proper night's sleep. For me after trying lots of different things including prescription sleeping pills, benzos, you name it, I found something that worked for me.

      Basically, I take 1 slow-release Melatonin tablet (releases over 6 hours). The dose is 750 micrograms. I purchased them online. I think they might be sent from the US as Melatonin is a prescription medication in the UK, not sure. I take it just as I get into bed and I watch a podcast on my phone. As soon as I start to feel sleepy, I stop and turn the lights out. I also listen to a tinnitus sound generator playing rainfall all night, not super loud but not whisper quiet. I turn this on in the bedroom as soon as I go up so it's on whilst I listen to the podcast.

      I also learned to sleep on the ear with tinnitus which screams at first but because I'm in a relaxed state I'm able to chill out and the sound strangely goes down, almost disappears (never does that in the day!).

      I stay in this sleepy drowsy state for a good 7-8 hours. In the morning my tinnitus spikes, but that's fine I just get up. I wake up 3-4 times a night and have to pee (I'm a type 1 diabetic) and I always get back off to sleep. I think my brain has learnt not the fear sleep (which I did at the start).

      I appreciate everyone's story is individual, but personally, I take great comfort from learning about other successes, even the little things.

      I still have tinnitus but think having cracked sleep I'm in a better place during the day.

      Hope this helps someone.

      /Jeff.
       
    21. Sointu
      No Mood

      Sointu Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma (also maybe med withdrawal)
      I got tinnitus while I had just recovered from insomnia. I have a history of insomnia but it has got so much better when I have learned ways to relax and take care of myself that supports sleeping. I had made a lot of progress with my insomnia before tinnitus. Recovery from insomnia had been a process that had taken years. I even went to therapy to get help for insomnia. I slept well first time in years before my tinnitus started. I had been able to taper my sleeping pill to a tiny dose and was planning to stop. I had learned to fall asleep without taking it. I have taken Melatonin during taper and my idea has been to replace my sleeping pill with Melatonin.

      But then my tinnitus started after loud noise. First week of tinnitus my sleep was really poor. It wrecked my sleep completely. I have been too anxious to do any relaxation techniques that worked before and falling asleep hearing tinnitus is difficult. All I hear is that awful tinnitus noise that makes relaxation impossible. Keeps me awake. No amount of white noise has helped me to forget it during the night. I have tried to listen to nature sounds. Birds singing. Ocean. Rain. Nope. I used to sleep with earplugs in complete silence before this tinnitus. That's why this has been even more difficult for me. I miss the silence.

      One day I decided to put air conditioner on for the night. And that noise helped me to forget my awful high pitch tinnitus noise. I had earplugs in my ears. I have got used to using them so they are part of my ritual falling asleep. The air conditioner machine keeps awful noise but even that was better than tinnitus noise. After I had kept it on for days during the night and many nights, I have been sleeping relatively well but there are nights when tinnitus bothers me too much and I sleep poorly. Sometimes I take the other earplug off from my ear when the tinnitus bothers a lot. I mostly hear it in left ear. I also don't need the air conditioner machine anymore this year because it is not so warm anymore. :dunno:

      I should find other noise to help me sleep for autumn and winter (hopefully this tinnitus will go away before winter though). Maybe I should find air conditioner noise somewhere because white noise isn't helping. :joyful: Maybe go to YouTube to search it :pompous:. I don't know :dunno:That noise needs to be loud because so is my tinnitus. My life has got so difficult after tinnitus. And ridiculous. Desperately trying to sleep with this awful noise ringing in my ears.

      I hate tinnitus.
       
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    22. Sointu
      No Mood

      Sointu Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma (also maybe med withdrawal)
      This has helped me a lot with insomnia. Unfortunately not as much with tinnitus-related insomnia but it has a calming effect. Worth trying.
       
    23. Damocles
      No Mood

      Damocles Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      England
      Tinnitus Since:
      2009
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Otitis media
      Research sub-forum on Tinnitus Talk.

      10 years ago I would have called it a stimulant; 10 years later it is very much a sedative.
       
    24. AJY

      AJY Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Bad Cold?
      Hi guys,

      I'd be appreciative of some suggestions for how to sleep more easily with T.

      My tinnitus developed about a month ago, potentially after a bad cold that I caught when visiting a friend. During the day, it doesn't really impact me as I'm busy chatting or in a non-silent environment. However, I struggle to sleep at night because of how loud the ringing is.

      What tips do you have for better sleep? I'm down for any advice, but I do not want to take sleeping pills as this is not sustainable.

      Thanks in advance.
       
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    25. Stacken77
      Wishful

      Stacken77 Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Sweden
      Tinnitus Since:
      10/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise (likely headphones & cars), Acoustic trauma did me in
      Hi @AJY.

      Sorry to hear about your sleeping problems, it's very common and I've had periods of poor sleep too throughout this.
      I completely understand the idea of avoiding sleeping pills as I've tried to manage it without. Sometimes though, I do use Melatonin which is the natural sleeping hormone in the body. It could be an idea to use it a few days and try to sleep without it a few days. It will most likely not do any harm.
      My situation is quite peculiar, because I have dealt with an extreme form of sensitivity to sound which has forced me to wear hearing protection literally 24/7 for the last 7 months. This has definitely speed up habituation since it's the only thing I've listened to, and most nights I can fall asleep without masking or medication even though my left ear can be very intrusive.

      Have you tried to use masking at night, maybe for the first two hours?

      If you feel that it doesn't help, and want to avoid sleeping pills, then the only option left is to try to get used to the sound further. I could recommend sitting in complete silence for an hour or two each day to just face the sounds. But it's no quick fix. Having read through a lot of posts, my understanding is that one can fall asleep even though the sound is intrusive, given that enough habituation has set in. When we no longer have any emotional reaction to the sound, the brain can drift off to sleep anyway. But of course, this may not be the case in the very most severe cases.

      I hope you get some well needed rest,
      Stacken
       
    26. Sandra Menzie

      Sandra Menzie Member

      Location:
      New York
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Hearing loss left ear. 60%
      I use the sleep pillow from Conair. Plays multiple sounds and has a timer. It is available at Walmart for around $37.00.

      It is helpful.
       
    27. Simon85

      Simon85 Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably noise exposure, but unknown.
      Sleeping pills aren’t for the long term, but I don't see an issue taking them for a few days.

      Alternatively, are you active during the day? Hitting the gym, going for a cycle or lifting weights should wear you out and help with better sleep. The same goes for eating well. Having a consistent sleep schedule also helps. Some people take Melatonin, but I haven’t tried it.
       
    28. Exit

      Exit Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise
      Some people use supplements like Magnesium or Melatonin.

      For most it’s probably better to make the bedroom a non silent environment. Music, fan, white noise, cicadas... etc.

      You do have a fair shot at getting recovery. I’ve heard many cold stories here and in life.
       
    29. ConfusedRicky
      Balanced

      ConfusedRicky Member

      Location:
      Stamford, England
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown/Maybe noise trauma
      I've been listening to some white noise, and rainy sounds on Spotify to sleep for the last week and it's worked a treat. There are proper sound machines that you can buy that do that as well.

      For me, the trick isn't so much falling asleep to begin with, but falling back asleep if I wake up in the night.
       
    30. Darktale

      Darktale Member

      Location:
      France
      Tinnitus Since:
      2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic Trauma
      Well to sleep I wear earplugs, which can seems quite paradoxical I can admit since you hear more your tinnitus and less any background noise... BUT... It is all related to the emotion I put behind the tinnitus.

      When I wear earplugs and go to sleep, the loudness and aggressiveness of my tinnitus does not make me panic because "it is normal, you wear earplugs, so don't worry..."

      Whereas if I do not wear earplugs, I cannot reassure me or downplay my tinnitus. It s loud and filling my head for real. There is no earplugs which can explain that. It is just the shitty reality.

      Not sure I am explaining the trick correctly to be understood though.

      Conclusion is that I am able not to pay attention to my tinnitus at bed when I wear earplugs whereas I will focus on the tinnitus if I wear nothing.
       
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