Gabapentin (Neurontin)

Discussion in 'Treatments' started by Jeff M., Jan 17, 2014.

tinnitus forum
    1. Jeff M.
      Cowabunga

      Jeff M. Member Benefactor

      Location:
      La Jolla, CA
      Tinnitus Since:
      Oct. 2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Idiopathic
      I was doing some research on Gabapentin (Neurotin) and was wondering if anyone out there has any intel on it?? The exhaustive study here: http://archotol.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=484708
      Claims it has little to no affect compared to placebo. But I have heard some encouraging results elsewhere. Any thoughts??
       
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    2. kenji

      kenji Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2013
      id say yes ...probably very helpful as it works on gaba ...calming effects
       
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    3. Stina
      Psychedelic

      Stina Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Tartu
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/13
      If it doesnt make it worse id say go for it:)
       
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    4. HighDesertSage

      HighDesertSage Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2013
      The tinnitus started in May, 2013 and habituation seemed to be helping by January. I saw the ATA fact sheet on Gabapentin and since it seemed to help some people, decided to try it. First night dose was 300 mg. No change. Second night dose was 300 mg. and not long after taking it the tinnitus became much louder, probably 50%, and it has stayed that way. I deeply regret trying this treatment and wanted to share this with others so they can make an informed decision if they're considering trying Gabapentin as a tinnitus treatment.
       
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    5. Stina
      Psychedelic

      Stina Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Tartu
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/13
      I suppose you took the drug in January? Did your doctor prescribe it? I also took a drug (Cinnarizine) which is meant for invigorating blood flow into the ears. However in addition to my usual hissing it created another sound, as if there was a pipe in my head. I suppose that was the invigorated bloodflow - well obviously that wasnt the problem for me. However when i stopped taking it after a few weeks it went back so Im really hoping that it will go back for you too.
       
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    6. HighDesertSage

      HighDesertSage Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2013
      Thank you for sharing your experience, Stina. It's encouraging to hear that your t went back to the previous level in a few weeks.
       
    7. jazz
      No Mood

      jazz Member Benefactor

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      8/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      eardrum rupture from virus; barotrauma from ETD
      @Jeff M. I could not get your link to load, but I did uncover this 2006 article on Gabapentin and tinnitus. If you're no longer interested in the drug, someone else might be. The article states that individual results varied, but some people did achieve relief from both tinnitus annoyance and loudness. Effective doses are also given. Gabapentin performs somewhat better for trauma associated tinnitus. I know some people on TT, like @just1morething, have used it with Klonapin with various degrees of success. Like most tinnitus drugs, you have to try it for yourself. But I believe Gabapentin is somewhat sedating until you get used to it.

      Here's the pubmed reference:

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16652071#

      Laryngoscope. 2006 May;116(5):675-81.

      Effect of gabapentin on the sensation and impact of tinnitus.

      Bauer CA1, Brozoski TJ.
      Author information

      Abstract

      OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS:
      This study evaluated the effectiveness of gabapentin in treating chronic tinnitus in two populations: participants withtinnitus with associated acoustic trauma and participants with tinnitus without associated acoustic trauma. The hypothesis was that gabapentin would decrease both subjective and objective features of tinnitus in the trauma group but would be less effective in the nontrauma group.

      STUDY DESIGN:
      Prospective, placebo-controlled, single-blind clinical trial.

      METHODS:
      Pure-tone audiograms and personal histories were used to categorize tinnitus etiology as either secondary to acoustic trauma or not associated with acoustic trauma. Participants were restricted to those with moderate to severe tinnitus for at least 1 year. All participants received gabapentin in a graduated ascending-descending dose series extending over 20 weeks (peak dose of 2,400 mg/d).

      RESULTS:
      There was a significant improvement in tinnitus annoyance for the trauma group (P = .05). Other subjective aspects of tinnitus were not significantly affected in either group. Between-subject variability of therapeutic response was considerable. Nevertheless, in consideration of subjective loudness ratings, 4 of 19 nontrauma participants and 6 of 20 trauma participants showed an improvement of 20% or better. In consideration of psychoacoustic loudness estimates, 3 of 19 nontrauma and 6 of 20 trauma participants showed an improvement of 20 dB HL or greater. Evenly dividing each group into high and low responders revealed significant improvement in loudness at 1,800 and 2,400 mg/day for the trauma high-response subgroup (P = .007). No significant improvement was obtained for other subgroups.

      CONCLUSION:
      Gabapentin is effective in reducing subjective and objective aspects of tinnitus in some individuals, with the best therapeutic response obtained in individuals with associated acoustic trauma.
       
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    8. Jeff M.
      Cowabunga

      Jeff M. Member Benefactor

      Location:
      La Jolla, CA
      Tinnitus Since:
      Oct. 2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Idiopathic
      Thanks Jazz!! Very interesting! I will investigate.

      Best to you! :)
       
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    9. Golly
      Bookworm

      Golly Member Benefactor Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      New York City
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      I have tried Gabapentin at relatively low doses. Taking between 300mg and 600mg a day did not appreciably alter the pattern of my intermittent (sleep-related) tinnitus. I was reluctant to increase the dose to therapeutic levels, as the drug is sedating.

      Since that experiment (in which I took Gabapentin daily), I occasionally take 100mg before bed. This gives me the kind of deep sleep that often results in a quiet day upon waking. So in that regard, I would say that Gabapentin is somewhat helpful in treating the "type" of tinnitus that I have.

      -Golly
       
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    10. Bella1

      Bella1 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1993
      Do you know what dose would be suggested? The peak dose seems really high/ sedating. Also does anyone have direct experience with clonazapam and doses/ time of day?

      Thanks!
       
    11. Golly
      Bookworm

      Golly Member Benefactor Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      New York City
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      I think that once you get up to between 1,200mg and 4,800mg per day, you are into the therapeutic range for Gabapentin.

      I also have some experience with Clonazepam (Klonapin). I take 1mg before bed up to two times a week. This has a similar effect on me as the Gabapentin, but possibly with a better success rate. I limit my use of Clonazepam, however, because of its addictive properties.

      In general, Clonzepam doses vary between 0.25mg and 2mg (and even higher).

      -Golly
       
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    12. Bella1

      Bella1 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1993
       
    13. Bella1

      Bella1 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      1993
      Did the clonazapam lower the tinnitus or just help you sleep? The gabapentin seemed to at first help then not even with increasing dose and wiped me out. It seems every drug I try just aggravates me!
       
    14. Golly
      Bookworm

      Golly Member Benefactor Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      New York City
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      No drug that I have tried will make my tinnitus levels drop. For me, the primary mechanism that lowers/eliminates tinnitus is sleep. (Weirdly, sleep is also the primary factor that brings about tinnitus, too.) I think Gabapentin and Klonopin both help bring about a sleep state that often reduces my tinnitus upon waking.

      -Golly
       
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    15. rtwombly
      Bookworm

      rtwombly Member

      Location:
      Southeast USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I'm finding sleep to be a major factor in my tinnitus too, though I don't have clear days. I can get a few precious minutes of "silence" first thing upon waking if I get 8+ hours, listen to some therapeutic sounds before bed, mask lightly through the night, and wear a mouth guard (I think there's a TMJ connection).

      GABA supplementation has been an important weapon in my arsenal. I read about how it does not cross the BBB but that it can when mixed with Niacin. Don't remember if that's what Gabapentin is or if I'm thinking of another drug. Anyway, I started taking sub-lingual GABA with a Niacin tablet as an experiment. The GABA is only 125mg, the Niacin 100mg, but I find the combination reduces my annoyance at the tinnitus far more than a 750mg GABA taken by capsule. In fact, I've dissolved the 750mg powder under my tongue and felt no effect, so I do believe the Niacin works as a carrier.
       
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    16. Golly
      Bookworm

      Golly Member Benefactor Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      New York City
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      @rtwombly:

      Do you take the GABA/Niacin before you sleep at night?

      -Golly
       
    17. rtwombly
      Bookworm

      rtwombly Member

      Location:
      Southeast USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I haven't, but I may try in future. I take a melatonin before bed, added to my usual (post-tinnitus) mini-pharmacy of antioxidants and herbs. Up to now I've used the GABA-Niacin combo at work or in a quiet environment when I'm having trouble concentrating. Helps me not to dwell on the noise.

      Do you have TMJ, Golly? I had a dentist visit recently and ever since I've noticed a lingering pain in my jaw. I know I'm a night clencher, but I'm starting to think that may have more of an impact on my mornings than I previously thought. Yesterday a couple of carrots socked me squarely in the ear - I bit down and got an immediate pain and high-pitched spike. Looks like it's back to baby food for me!
       
    18. Golly
      Bookworm

      Golly Member Benefactor Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      New York City
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      Hi @rtwombly;

      I do not have a classical case of TMJ. That is, I went to see a specialist who took X-rays and and examined my bite, concluding that I appear reasonably normal. That said, on days when my tinnitus is bad, my face feels especially tight: in particular, right in front of my ears. On these days my jaw pops more than usual, too. I tried a night splint for a while; I tried trigger point therapy; I have even seen a physical therapist who attempted to relax my facial muscles. It's difficult to gauge the benefit of any of these treatments. Certainly, none of them cured me! As I have mentioned elsewhere, Klonopin, Remeron, and Gabapentin either alone or in some combination give me some relief inasmuch as they produce a sleep-state that seems to relax my mind/body.

      I am curious about trying Niacin, but my blood levels have proved to be normal; so I am wary of supplementing beyond the RDA.


      -Golly
       
    19. rtwombly
      Bookworm

      rtwombly Member

      Location:
      Southeast USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      To be clear, I don't think the Niacin does anything therapeutic at all, it just seems to boost the GABA, possibly by carrying it through the BBB. I went cheap, too, so it also makes my skin tingle and my ears burn, which I personally don't mind. That's called Niacin flush and you can get non-flushing versions for $$.

      Like you, my dentist said my bite was fine. Of course, I had to insist he check me at all. Like my GP and ENT, as soon as I said the word "tinnitus", his curiosity seemed to switch off. Hate to say it as I do like the dentist and have been seeing him for a number of years. In my short experience, conventional medical professionals seemed to have been coached to go into avoidance mode whenever a patient says the t-word.
       
    20. Leah

      Leah Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Chardon, Ohio USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      I find I also experience the relationship of sleep and tinnitus.
       
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    21. Golly
      Bookworm

      Golly Member Benefactor Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      New York City
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      Hi @rtwombly;

      GABA mixed with Niacin is called Picamilon. It is discussed at TT in various threads.

      ~Golly
       
    22. Rico Napoli

      Rico Napoli Member

      I was prescribed this drug for it's off label. According to Kevin Hogan this can cure T ? The drug is for herpes zoster and pain. It's making my ears hurt and I think it's bullshit. Anyone have success with this drug eliminating Tinnitus ?
       
    23. undecided
      Fine

      undecided Member

      Location:
      Greece
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown.
      Its Gabapentin, an anti-convulsant.
      I believe a couple of members of this forum have found it useful. I'm pretty sure it doesn't cure tinnitus though.
       
    24. 65vwbus
      Dreaming

      65vwbus Member

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      I've been on Gabapentin (for face nerve pain and headache) since November last year, but it didn't do anything for my tinnitus. And not much for the pain either!
      Topiramate (another epilepsy drug used for pain) made the noise worse.
       
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    25. Golly
      Bookworm

      Golly Member Benefactor Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      New York City
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      I find that 100mg (a very low dose, to be sure) of Neurontin (Gabapentin) before bed increases the likelihood that I will have reduced (if not eliminated) head noise upon waking. I only take it once or twice a week, and I doubt it would have the same effect with regular use.

      There have been numerous studies that examine the efficacy of Neurontin as a treatment of tinnitus. While there has been some consensus that it is no better than a placebo, a recent meta-study suggests that no firm conclusions can be drawn:

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21940981

      -Golly
       
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    26. Rico Napoli

      Rico Napoli Member

      Just read a story online a woman with a cyst was give Gabapentin in the hospital and then developed Tinnitus. Wonderful that with Lyrica are oxotoxic and ruin your hearing let alone T.
       
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    27. Golly
      Bookworm

      Golly Member Benefactor Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      New York City
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2011
      Just to be clear, Lyrica (the brand name of Pregabalin) can be thought of as an improved Neurontin (the brand name of Gabapentin). Lyrica can be taken in smaller doses than can Neurontin, and it is supposed to have fewer side effects. As for ototoxicity, I don't believe that either drug can be ranked along with the main culprits, including certain antibiotics, quinine, and aspirin (at high doses).

      Many medications list tinnitus as a possible side effect, even though the chances of developing it might be remote. Know that in the vast majority of cases, Gabapentin will not lead to tinnitus. Generally, tinnitus that arises from drug exposure typically subsides once the patient stops taking the medication.

      -Golly
       
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    28. Scicia
      Fine

      Scicia Member

      Location:
      New York
      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2014
      My doctor wants me to start taking Gabapentin for nerve pain in my face. I'm terrified to try it due to a recent/current T spike that I'm experiencing. Did any of you have a spike from Gabapentin? And if so was it permanent or did it subside in time?
       
    29. SethL
      Thinking

      SethL Member

      Location:
      Central Coast CA
      Tinnitus Since:
      09/14
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown-woke up one day with it
      I had a really bad spike on Sunday and again yesterday. I took 300mg Gabapentin and within an hour and half the spike had come down dramatically. I think other posts are correct wherein they said that it can be effective in reducing some of your T but only in some people. It is not proven to work effectively for even a majority of people. My mother takes it for nerve pain in her tail bone so I was able to get it without having to go to the doctor. My ENT is actually really cool and already gave me a prescription for Potiga/Trobalt which is discussed in another thread. Haven't filled it yet since the pharmacy charges between $600-$800 depending on size and quantity. But that would only get me about 4-6 weeks supply. For them time being I will actually continue to try Gabapentin if any other spikes happen.
       
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    30. Do you have trigeminal Neuralgia? I take 1mg of clonazepam for my facial nerve pain and it works. Research it and good luck :)
       

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