Genome Sequencing & Tinnitus — Identifying Genetic Traits/Variations

Discussion in 'Support' started by GBB, Oct 17, 2020.

    1. GBB

      GBB Member

      Location:
      NYC
      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Microsuction / Additional Acoustic Trauma in Close Proximity
      One interesting aspect to all of this which I haven't seen discussed that much, is we now have the ability (and have had for quite some time) to have our genome sequenced, and then we can take that raw data and plug it into a tool like Promethease, which will look at genes you have which are noted in academic research, and in doing so, likely highlight traits that may make you more susceptible to developing conditions like tinnitus, like glutamate metabolism etc...

      I am in the process of retrieving my raw data now, but curious if anyone else has done this. I used 23andMe for the sequencing and then will plug that data into secondary tools as needed.

      Aspirationally, it would be cool if we could identify common genetic traits/variations amongst our community of afflicted, though that is just an idea.
       
    2. ajc

      ajc Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2002; spike 2009; worse 2017-18
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud music - noise damage
      I think this is interesting but does 23andMe really cover the full genome? I thought they only covered a part of it.

      Hasn't @FGG done this 23andMe as well?
       
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      GBB

      GBB Member

      Location:
      NYC
      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Microsuction / Additional Acoustic Trauma in Close Proximity
      I believe they do genotyping and not sequencing. @Mods not sure if I can change the title to replace "sequencing" with "genotyping" for accuracy.

      Per 23andMe:
      Genotyping is the process of determining which genetic variants an individual possesses. Genotyping can be performed through a variety of different methods, depending on the variants of interest and the resources available. For looking at many different variants at once, especially common variants, genotyping chips are an efficient and accurate method. They do, however, require prior identification of the variants of interest.
       
    4. FGG
      No Mood

      FGG Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Multi-factorial
      23andMe retrieves a lot more than they report to you (which is next to nothing and only your genotype). But you can sign up for Promethease and give them permission to upload your genome from 23andMe and then you get a huge amount of info.
       
    5. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      GBB

      GBB Member

      Location:
      NYC
      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Microsuction / Additional Acoustic Trauma in Close Proximity
      Alright, well I went through all of Promethease and there was nothing related to hearing, glutamate, or anything I could use for tinnitus, so this idea was short-lived.
       
    6. FGG
      No Mood

      FGG Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Multi-factorial
      Did you try searching for individual genes? Not just scrolling through the first page.
       
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    7. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      GBB

      GBB Member

      Location:
      NYC
      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Microsuction / Additional Acoustic Trauma in Close Proximity
      @FGG

      I went through all of the genes highlighted for 4x, 2x trait probability etc... after that I tried a key word search on hearing, ear, auditory, glutamate, and a few other things.

      Since I can’t find anything “top-down”, the other way is if I ever come across a specific gene I can search the record “bottom-up” for that specific element, but right now nothing sticks out. I will take another scroll through.

      Right now takeaways are: high baldness probability (though has not manifested yet), elevated risk of certain cancers, slow metabolism, light sleeper, should be very muscley and tall, and reduced risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia : )
       
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    8. FGG
      No Mood

      FGG Member Podcast Patron Benefactor Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Multi-factorial
      Right, you need to go bottom up. I didn't realize you already noticed that. The only way to do this is with the individual gene search feature. You can look at GABA genes etc but you have to first research which genes affect the receptors.

      It doesn't tell you how to interpret these alleles but it tells you your genotype. But that's what I meant by having to compare with others. You'd basically have to do your own research by trying to see if any commonalities show up.
       
    9. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      GBB

      GBB Member

      Location:
      NYC
      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Microsuction / Additional Acoustic Trauma in Close Proximity
      Ah okay, that makes perfect sense. Now we're getting into real researcher territory and away from my hobbyist abilities. I am smart enough to recognize that undertaking an analysis like this would be good idea, but not smart enough necessarily to do it. Did I mention in my past life I was a management consultant?
       
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