Head Hissing Tinnitus Potentially Somatic?

Discussion in 'Support' started by Ashley Ann, Aug 13, 2020.

    1. Ashley Ann
      Jaded

      Ashley Ann Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      potentially noise-induced or somatic. ultimately unknown.
      Hello everyone!

      I posted here a good few months ago about my tinnitus, which has been getting worse as the months go on. And like many people here, I'm struggling to find a definitive reason for my onset and the exacerbation of it in previous months. Whilst I do think that my mental health attributes for a part of it, I did want to run a question by the forum and ask about experiences with somatic tinnitus.

      My baseline is low, it's a faint "eee" sound in my left ear. But in previous months, I can now hear my baseline in my 'good' ear and I've gained a head hiss that I can't quite pin point to an exact place in my ears/head. It fluctuates greatly with my anxiety, but I've realised that I can modulate the sound with my jaw or by tucking my chin against my chest and by moving my head to the left/right and looking over my shoulder. The hiss in my head in particular, that I gained last October, raises in pitch. I do have TMJ, I frequently get jaw pain and pain in my teeth that I can't quite pin point (either impacted wisdom teeth, tooth grinding or booth). Does this sound like it could potentially be somatic tinnitus and there could be something wrong with my neck/back or something to do with muscles? I'm considering a visit back to my chiropractor after I meet with my dentist when lock down measures ease (I'm UK based, Scotland to be exact) who suggested getting a mouth guard made for sleeping.

      I more or less wanted to ask about experiences with somatic tinnitus and what has worked for people here/suggestions of what kind of treatments to pursue. I definitely don't expect to get rid of tinnitus, but a mild decrease in volume would be wonderful at this point. Worth mentioning that I've seen ENT's and audiologists the past few months who find nothing wrong with the mechanics of my ears and my hearing is perfect.

      I've also been wondering whether the high frequency hiss in my head could perhaps be high frequency hearing loss and whether a normal hearing test would even been able to pick that up?
       
    2. Kendra

      Kendra Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      SSNHL/ Acoustic Trauma
      A normal hearing test isn’t going to be able to pick up high frequency hearing loss. It could be your TMJ if it gets louder or quieter doing certain things. I would definitely go get checked by your dentist and someone who can check to make sure you don’t have any disc problems in your neck.
       
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    3. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      HI @Ashley Ann

      Your tinnitus might be somatic or caused by an underlying medical condition within your auditory system. The only way to find the exact cause is to be examined at ENT. I briefly read some of your previous posts and see you've had tinnitus for quite a while. Have you been seen at ENT and had any treatment or referred to Audiology to see a Hearing Therapist or Audiologist? This is the usual practice under the NHS.

      If your tinnitus isn't somatic and not caused by an underlying medical condition and medication isn't responsible, then it's likely to be Noise induced. Noise induced tinnitus is the most common cause and typically, it is listening to music through headphones at too high a volume and for long durations. Prior to the onset of the tinnitus two years ago, if you frequently used headphones, earbuds, headset or attended venues where loud music was played: clubs, concerts then the tinnitus is likely to be "Noise induced". If you are still using headphones even at low volume this could be the cause of your tinnitus increasing.

      I think it's a good idea to go back to ENT for tests. Please click on the links below and read my posts that you might find helpful.

      All the best
      Michael

      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/new-to-tinnitus-what-to-do.12558/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/hyperacusis-as-i-see-it.19174/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/tinnitus-a-personal-view.18668/
       
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    4. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Ashley Ann
      Jaded

      Ashley Ann Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      potentially noise-induced or somatic. ultimately unknown.
      Hi Michael!

      Thank you for the response, we spoke some time ago about my tinnitus and I can't say things have changed much since. I saw an ENT around Christmas time who referred me to an audiologist at the tinnitus clinic, but this hasn't yet materialised due to Covid restrictions. I'm in Scotland, our NHS services haven't resumed as normal as of yet. My ENT was quite dismissive in all honesty, they gave me a hearing test, checked my ear drums, he asked me what kind of music I listen to and if I frequent loud places and more or less told me that I was stuck with it and there was nothing that could be done. And you never feel like you're in a position to challenge them, it's the NHS, services are limited to begin with.

      Given I have TMJ and the noise can be modulated through neck and jaw movements, I'm really beginning to wonder if there's some kind of connection. I feel like whatever is happening with my jaw is affecting my left ear, where I'm experiencing pain, fullness and crackling sounds every time I swallow. Which I'm guessing is the middle ear? I'm not a person who frequents bars, clubs, concerts or noisy places often, if at all. I do use headphones or did rather, but at a moderate level and I haven't used them since my tinnitus got worse circa last September, so it's almost been a year. I initially thought it might have been noise induced, which is still a possibility. But if it is somatic and a symptom of something else, I'm not entirely sure how I would go about finding this out.

      Thanks!

       
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    5. Deniseh

      Deniseh Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      July 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Possibly b12/folic acid deficiency and GERD
      Hi @Ashley Ann,

      Your tinnitus sounds very much like mine, I can turn mine off or decrease the sound by turning my neck a certain way, I have a low buzz/whine in my left ear which I’ve had for just over a year, there’s also a very quiet high pitch which is intermittent.

      Like yourself I live in sunny Scotland :) however because the NHS appointment take forever decided to go private unfortunately I was left in the same position as yourself, lots of potential causes but no definitive answer. I was hoping for the NHS referral as well but my GP cancelled this without telling me because I went private even though I wanted a 2nd opinion.

      You mentioned something with your jaw and feel maybe TMJ. I’m the same, I feel my tinnitus is connected to jaw/tooth problems, when I wiggle my jaw from left to right there’s a strange feeling in my inner ear almost as if my bone is connecting with a nerve, I know it sounds strange but that’s the only way I can describe it and my left ear pops every time I swallow/drink etc so I think your onto something.

      There are a few people on this forum who are really learned on jaw/neck issues so I hope they can give you some answers.

      Anyway just wanted to support a fellow Scot.

      All the Best

      Denise :)
       
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    6. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      HI @Ashley Ann

      You have been very thorough with the details in your post and this helps a lot. Since you haven't used headphones for a long time and not attended venues where loud music is played it's probably safe to say exposure to loud sound/noise isn't the cause of your tinnitus increasing. The fact that you have TMJ something I wasn't previoulsy aware of, could be contributing to the increase in the tinnitus. Therefore, it might be a good idea to see a dentist or orthodontist to get your jaw examined, since you say the noise can be modulated by moving your neck and jaw. Experiencing pain and crackling every time you swallow suggests to me this is the route I think you should take. TMJ is known to cause tinnitus and sometimes people with this condition, have to have a mouth guard made to stop their teeth grinding when asleep.

      This is not a field I am familiar with but my understanding, is that some of the nerves that go into the inner ear, also surround the Temporomandiular Joint (jaw joint) and believe this is one of the reasons your tinnitus can be manipulated when moving your jaw.

      Best of luck
      Michael
       
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    7. Padraigh Griffin

      Padraigh Griffin Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown/Stress
      Hi, I am very interested in your progress as your tinnitus sounds very much like mine except I have a pulsating element to it.

      I can modulate my tinnitus by minor jaw movements and neck turning.
      It always results in an considerable amplification of the sound to a extremely high pitched noise.

      I've been dealing with extreme anxiety (birth of 23 weeker twin boys) since 1st August 2018 and feel that i have been jaw clenching since then and it has contributed to it.

      So far I've seen an Audiologist (mild hearing loss), and a Neurologist for pulsatile tinnitus with clear scans.

      Hope it improves for all of us.
       
    8. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      I understand your reasons for going Private but it would have been better to wait to be seen by the NHS. No private practice in the UK, can compete with the NHS for tinnitus treatment that I assure you. The reason being tinnitus is often a long term treatment and private clinics are not in for the long haul where tinnitus is concerned. I am still under the same NHS hospital as an out-patient for 24 years. I have been seen at ENT and Audiology many times over this period of time.

      When someone first develops tinnitus and is referred to ENT by their GP, sometimes people wonder why the appointment takes 4 to 6 months but there is a good reason for this. The ear is a delicate organ and often ENT doctors prefer not to see a tinnitus patient too soon as long as it's straight-forward tinnitus. By this I mean the patient isn't experiencing acute pain in the ears, dizziness, deafness or balance problems. If they were then they would usually be fast tracked to ENT. Tinnitus can go completely away for some people within 6 months and many do habituate and this is the reason doctors prefer to leave the ears alone. After 6 months if a person is still having difficulty managing tinnitus and it's not caused by an underlying medical condition as in Noise induced, they are usually referred to Audiology to see an Audiologist or Hearing Therapist. Treatments can include: sound therapy, counselling, medication, CBT or TRT depending on what the hospital has to offer.

      Michael
       
    9. Kriszti

      Kriszti Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2016/2017/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      This is interesting how different protocols are. In my country, among the tinnitus community it seems to be the norm that you have to get to an ENT as fast as possible. Routine treatment consists of IV vascular enhancer (piracetam, vinpocetine, etc.) and IV steroid, then you take piracetam and some betahistine orally for moths.
      Success rate is very ambiguous though.

      I only took tablets of Nootropil and betahistine with no positive results, and frankly now I wish I wouldn't have.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    10. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Ashley Ann Hello. Is your jaw still (not moving) and not being tensed when doing the above?
       
    11. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      As I have said: If the person has straight-forward tinnitus as in Noise induced tinnitus or acoustic trauma, without additional symptoms such as: Acute ear pain, dizziness, balance problems or deafness, then the best treatment is to leave the ears alone. However, if a person is experiencing the symptoms I have mentioned then early intervention is advised and often the patient will be fast-tracted to be seen at ENT. The ear is a very delicate organ and too early an intervention can often make things worse!

      Michael
       
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    12. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Ashley Ann
      Jaded

      Ashley Ann Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      potentially noise-induced or somatic. ultimately unknown.
      Hi there fellow Scot! You're the first I've encountered here, haha!

      My baseline tinnitus is a whine in my left ear, but during an extremely stressful period in my life last autumn, I developed a head hiss/buzz - I think it's located in my left ear also but it feels more like it's located in my head sometimes and my right ear has picked up the sound. I have all kinds of things going on in my head and absolutely no reason for it. I don't think I've done anything differently last year, so I'm struggling to find a reason as to why I have a symphony of sounds in my head. The only thing I can think of is that it's tooth grinding or something to do with my neck due to stress and/or bad posture. Unfortunately mine doesn't decrease when I move my neck or jaw, the hiss in my head just becomes more prominent. What that means, I'm not entirely sure.

      I'd go private if I wasn't worried of costs, I don't think I could afford to consider it. But given the way things are right now.. it seems increasingly unlikely to be seen by the NHS anytime soon. I've been waiting 8 months to see an audiologist, I waited 6 months to see an ENT and finally saw them on Christmas eve last year. The whole system, whilst can be wonderful, is a bit of a joke sometimes, isn't it. I hope you have some success with private treatment. :( Have you seen anyone yet?

      My TMJ primarily affects my right side - my jaw pops, aches, I get extremely bad jaw pain and facial pressure. And ever since I developed my head hiss, I've been experiencing the worst ear pain, fullness in my ear and a clicking/crackling sound every time I swallow which makes me think middle ear or some kind of ETD problems. TMJ and ear issues run in my family, so when I connect the dots.. I really feel like there's something going on and ENT's just aren't willing to do anything for me because my hearing is within adequate range.

      It's also probably worth noting that my initial onset of tinnitus started after a visit to the chiropractor within which I had my first neck adjustment in my life (I had a bad leg breakage years ago so my gait/back and posture is all out of whack) lol, which makes me extremely reluctant to go back and let them do anything to me that might make it worse if it is a mechanical issue with my neck/back.

       
    13. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Ashley Ann
      Jaded

      Ashley Ann Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      potentially noise-induced or somatic. ultimately unknown.
      Hi Greg!

      My jaw isn't tensed when I move my neck from side to side or when I look up/down or from side to side/over my shoulder, I'm completely relaxed and the hiss in my head/left ear becomes more pronounced. My baseline doesn't change, just this new sound that's appeared last autumn. My neck muscles are also extremely tense and I've always suffered from back pain. It's what prompted my initial chiropractic visit, within which my neck was adjusted not too long before my initial onset of tinnitus. I truly believe that there's some connection!

       
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    14. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Ashley Ann
      Jaded

      Ashley Ann Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      potentially noise-induced or somatic. ultimately unknown.
      Is there any way to tell if you have high frequency hearing loss? From doing a little digging around online, it seems pretty impossible to get anything beyond your standard hearing test, at least in my country anyway. But thank you, I definitely intend to! My tinnitus did develop not long after I had a chiropractic neck adjustment, which makes me a little reluctant to go anywhere near anyone who's going to potentially do further damage.
       
    15. Thuan

      Thuan Member

      Location:
      California
      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection
      This website has an app that plays pure tone up to 15 kHz: http://www.generalfuzz.net/acrn/

      Word of CAUTION: it may make your tinnitus worse if you're not careful.

      What I did was use earphones AWAY from my ear but held it relatively close. On the very very lowest volume from your computer, find a random music file and direct an angle with your earbuds that give you the best volume. If you can not hear it, then up the volume little by little until you can hear it. On the website, choose a decent range from 1 kHz to 8 kHz pure tone. Again, find a comfortable volume that you can hear at the lowest setting. Then stay at that volume and change the frequency to 9 kHz, 10 kHz, and etc to 15 kHz.

      Humans are not very sensitive to sounds higher than 8 kHz so it's natural that frequencies above 8 kHz are harder to hear, perhaps by upping a few notches on the volume. However, if you can't hear them, then increase the volume a LITTLE bit and see if you can hear it more. Do not go beyond doubling the volume because it might damage your ears.

      If you have hearing loss at a certain frequency, you'll noticed a "significantly" lowered volume or can not hear it at all.

      For me I only have noticeable tinnitus on my right ear so I know when there is a huge difference in volume between my good ear and bad ear. My bad ear is always a little bit lowered in volume for all frequencies. However, I start to have trouble hearing in 12.5 kHz on my bad ear but I can still hear it. I started having much difficulty hearing 13 kHz and had to up my volume a few notches (up to 3x volume which I now realized is too loud so don't go beyond 2x if you want to be safe). I could not hear anything beyond 14 kHz at all on my bad ear but it was loud and clear on my good ear.

      However, getting an extended audiogram can tell you the severity of your high or ultra high frequencies lost.

      I have to warn you, knowing if you have UHF hearing loss doesn't help at all. No medical doctors or hearing aids can help. So doing this is only for self-affirmation but when I found out I have UHF loss at 14 kHz and up was very depressing.
       
      • Like Like x 2
    16. Kendra

      Kendra Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      SSNHL/ Acoustic Trauma
      You could ask for an MRI to rule out any cervical spine problems. Remember to advocate for yourself to your doctors. Sometimes you have to be insistent to get tests done.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    17. dan
      Chatty

      dan Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Toronto, Canada
      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud noise
      Try to see if your tinnitus is exacerbated when your wisdom teeth hurt.
       
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    18. Deniseh

      Deniseh Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      July 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Possibly b12/folic acid deficiency and GERD
      Hi @Michael Leigh

      I originally presented to my GP with lightheadedness and tinnitus and she thought could be Ménières so was referred to ENT however a few weeks later I took an anxiety attack and ended up in A&E where my blood pressure was off the chart, the doctor checked the system and agreed there was a referral but advised I would wait months for it, this was the only reason I went private, however you are correct they don’t offer any better a service, just a quicker one and in actual fact the ENT consultant I saw works for the NHS as well.

      Denise
       
    19. Deniseh

      Deniseh Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      July 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Possibly b12/folic acid deficiency and GERD
      Hi @Ashley Ann,

      Goimg private can be pricey, I am lucky that I’m covered by my employers so only pay a small percentage of my bill and that’s the only reason I used BUPA on this occasion.

      Strangely though when I first presented with tinnitus I was feeling lightheaded as well, GP thought may have been Ménière's so was referred to ENT and Audiologists, my appointment for the Audiologists came in 2 weeks later and when tested, although basic, I was told my hearing was fine but was told I’d wait months for my ENT appointment hence going private. I was given a few probable causes for my tinnitus mainly.

      Acid reflux and b12 deficiency which I had at the time also possible vestibular migraine or potential early onset Ménière although Vertigo was ruled out so otherwise she didn’t have a clue :( I myself am thinking it’s more to do with my jaw/teeth as I am a night grinder and have a broken wisdom tooth which had an abscess which wasn’t treated at the time. I spoke to my dentist who advised inflammation or TMJ could be the cause as the jaw shares nerves with the ear and everything is in the left side... coincidence, I think not!!!! Anyway my appointment was cancelled due to COVID-19 and who knows when the Dentist will see me now!

      Over the past year my tinnitus has changed a lot and while I don’t think I’ve fully habituated it no longer affects me the same which is good so for now I’ll keep plodding along.

      Keep me updated on how your progressing.

      All the Best,

      Denise xoxo
       
      • Like Like x 1
    20. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Ashley Ann - Hi again.

      The auditory tube connects to part of the middle ear, which is filled with air. It's the connection between the nasal cavity above the soft palate of the mouth. Normally, the eustachian tube is collapsed, but opens up both when swallowing and with positive pressure. This change causes the air in the middle ear to expand and contract, which causes this structure to push into the back of the nose and mouth and causes a clinking sensation when you swallow from TMJ joint, ETD or nasal. Give this a little time to see if it resolves.


      Probably so, but 99.5 % of the time, tinnitus doesn't appear. Tinnitus cause is often being unlucky. Sometimes tense muscles of back and neck will place pressure upon the C spine. Then the C spine becomes fragile from muscle spasms. My somatic T was caused from lifting my head off a dental headrest when the dentist was applying pressure to my lower jaw for over a hour. This caused muscles in my neck to spasm where it straighten my C spine and caused TMJ. With some, depending on amount of trauma, TMJ or increased TMJ may not appear for months or a few years. Tinnitus for both you and me was caused from occipital nerves in the top part of the neck. This tinnitus for you wasn't somatic because trauma from your chiro visit did not effect your auditory nerve. The Circle of Willis was not effected because you don't have dizziness.

      Yes, it's somatic when turning head, jaw or neck and sound temporary increases. I would take @Michael Leigh advice in post #11 above. Can't say if you have hearing loss, but just neck and jaw tinnitus may not associate to hearing loss. If no hearing loss, tinnitus can greatly improve with neck, jaw and teeth treatments. Even with hearing loss, tinnitus, you still would have a change for improvement with physical and dental therapy.

      Head hiss can be caused from anything above the shoulders, but yours when baseline doesn't change may be from sternocleidomastoid muscles or other neck muscles. They may need to be loosen with outward extension therapy. Meaning don't pressure these muscles hard against the C spine. Magnesium Glycinate 400 - 1/3 tablet three times a day with 1/3 or a little less of vitamin C. Magnesium will help loosen muscles.

      With TMJ, I would get a dental made mouth guard for upper teeth. That could help with tinnitus and hiss. It may be better, not to have the guard cover your wisdom teeth. Your dentist will decide. When removing the guard in the morning, control jaw movement for a few minutes. Wait a few minutes before eating and brushing teeth.

      Stay in touch. :)
       
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    21. DebInAustralia
      No Mood

      DebInAustralia Member Benefactor Advocate

      Location:
      Geelong, Victoria
      Tinnitus Since:
      30/12/13
      Hi Ashley Ann,

      I am sorry that your situation hasn't improved.

      I know how frustrating it is to get help at this time with regards to diagnostics and treatments.

      What did your audiogram look like?

      I did manage to do an extended audiogram years ago, because like you, I suspected that I had (and do) a high frequency hearing loss.

      I wanted to try an OAE (I think it's called?), but to no avail here.

      Like you, I have peripheral and central tinnitus, which moves about. I can modulate the noise with facial movements to some degree, and experience residual inhibition if I listen to certain sound files around the frequency of my hearing loss. If I find the right sound, I can almost silence all of the hissing, and then underneath that, I can hear a faint head noise that I could easily ignore.

      I know Susan Shore certainly believes there is a correlation between tinnitus and TMJ. You probably know that Susan hypothesises that the noise is generated by the somatic nervous system in an attempt to compensate for the loss of auditory input.

      If you are one who responds to sound, have you tried ACRN/Lenire at all to see if this helps calm things down?

      I have been told I have TMJ too. However, TMJ work for me with an experienced physio did not help.

      It still may be useful to find a TMJ physio or just look up TMJ exercises online to see if this helps?

      I do think dental issues contribute to the presence of tinnitus. I am in the throes of another relapse due to an abscessed tooth, that I now plan to extract (not me personally). It flared up in March, and settled down with antimicrobials (pre diagnosis). So, I think I can pretty safely say that the abscess is contributing somatically in some way.

      Maybe someone else could add to this?

      Are molars in the mandibular area a problem in terms of tinnitus? Anyone?

      Like you, I don't think addressing my dental issues will completely resolve my tinnitus, but I believe it is probably contributing to it to some degree.

      I think it would be great if you could get yourself an extended audiogram to establish if you have a high frequency loss. That may then give you some direction.

      Please let us know how you get along. Hang in there.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    22. Mathew Gould

      Mathew Gould Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      6/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Neck/Jaw misalignment
      Could it be TMJ if it gets louder or quieter on random days?
       
    23. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      HI @Deniseh

      Even though you wrote my name @Michael Leigh I did not receive an Alert message so only saw your post by chance. As I have said and you're now aware. No private treatment in the UK can compete with the NHS for help and long term aftercare for tinnitus. When I developed tinnitus 24 years ago and was waiting to be seen at ENT after my GP referred me it felt like I was waiting forever and couldn't understand why and in a desperate state. At the end of my tether I asked my GP if he could please recommend somewhere I could go privately as I just couldn't cope.

      My doctor was very understanding to what I was going through but explained to me in the exact words I have written above and mentioned many times in this forum: You will get the best help and long term aftercare under the NHS. Twenty four years on I have found his words to be absolutely true. I have corresponded with many people in the UK at tinnitus forums and by email and phone that have gone private. Because the ear is such a delicate organ most private ENT doctors will only document a patient's medical history, carry out hearing tests and after they have extracted enough money out of you say go to the NHS. They will not want to get too involved or undermine a GP.

      As you have found out and something I have known for many years. Many Private doctors also work for the NHS.

      @Ashley Ann I am sorry to know of the discomfort that you are going through. Reading your other posts in this thread I have a few things to say: The hissing you hear in your head is typical of tinnitus which can also be experienced in the ears among the other sounds you are hearing. You have mentioned TMJ, Neck muscles and back problems you've had and also stress I believe. I suggest you go back to your doctor and keep going as I did many years ago, and explain the difficulties that you are experiencing and hopefully you will be seen at ENT sooner. If you have received an appointment letter from ENT or have a previous letter from them, you could write to your consultant explaining what you are going through.

      Before doing above talk this over with the GP first and ask his/her advice if it's okay. I have done this in the past having spoke to my GP first, then wrote to my ENT consultant and they would see me within a week or two.

      Best of luck.
      Michael
       
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    24. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Ashley Ann
      Jaded

      Ashley Ann Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      potentially noise-induced or somatic. ultimately unknown.
      Thank you, Michael!

      I'm hoping that once lockdown restrictions are gone and life gets back to normal, I'll at least get to speak to an audiologist at the tinnitus clinic. I'm not entirely sure what the protocol is there or what they'll do. I believe if there isn't a somatic explanation or component of my tinnitus, then it's solely noise induced. I've been using headphones since I was a teenager, I'm part of that generation.. so I have no doubt it has played a role in my tinnitus onset. All of my tinnitus sounds are high, which makes me wonder if it could be high frequency hearing loss. Does tinnitus (particularly of the noise-induced kind) always mean hearing loss, irregardless of the frequency its in? Do you know if there is any opportunity when speaking to NHS audiologists to have a high frequency/hidden hearing loss test done? But if it were high frequency hearing loss, I'm not even sure what they'd do for that given it's outwith the realm of "normal" hearing. My sound is incredibly reactive to everything around me because it's so high, I would estimate it's somewhere in the region of 13-15kHz and incredibly uncomfortable. It's difficult to determine what it is at this point.

      As for writing to my ENT consultant.. I haven't received letters, but I imagine I could get details from my doctor or ask to be re-referred, but I think I might have to push for it. Whilst the NHS is a wonderful thing, there are a lot of limitations.



       
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    25. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      Ashley Ann
      Jaded

      Ashley Ann Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      potentially noise-induced or somatic. ultimately unknown.
      I would estimate my sound in my left ear is somewhere in the 13-15kHz region, so this is pretty grim reading, haha. I did read online that some systems aren't capable of replicating these sounds adequately, therefore I understand that listening to them online probably isn't the same as a proper test. But I do know that this new tone in my left ear is extremely high and came out of absolutely nowhere. I can't understand how I've ended up with hearing loss when I've been nowhere or done nothing to trigger it.. or where it's just natural deterioration of the auditory system. Even if I'm only 29 years old lol. But my family, namely my sister and my father, both suffer from hearing issues, so I suppose it could always be genetics if there's an argument for that.

      Thank you for this though, it was informative! And there's absolutely nothing at all that can be done for hearing loss in the high frequencies? Other than drugs I've seen people on the forum talking about holding out for in the distant future. I have seen a few people talking about hearing aids perhaps being somewhat beneficial in lowering the tone slightly, have you ever attempted to use them before? If only for curiosities sake? I understand most of them don't really cater to frequencies that high, but I wonder if anyone has ever gave it a shot with success.

       
    26. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      @Ashley Ann

      You are welcome Ashely. I know you are going though a lot of difficulty with tinnitus at the moment but want to briefly say it's a pleasure reading your posts as you have such a good writing style. It's articulate and flows effortlessly. I don't know the kind of career you're intending to going in but if it's something in writing you're sure to do well in it. Please keep it this up as nice to see.

      The NHS is a wonderful health service in my opinion and speak from personal experience having been well looked after for many years. It has its problems like any large organisation and doesn't always run as smoothly as it should. Unfortunately, in some parts of the country this is more evident more than others. People with noise induced tinnitus do not always have hearing loss including yours truly. I advise you to start taking Gingko Biloba as it can help improve hearing and tinnitus in some people.

      When I first got tinnitus twenty four years ago, I was advised by a Herbalist who was knowledgeable in noise induced tinnitus to start taking GB and magnesium tablets. At the time I was sure I had some hearing impairment but to what degree I didn't know. When I was seen at ENT 6 months later my consultant said my hearing test showed I had above normal. He asked if I was taking anything and explained about the GP and magnesium. I was informed he advises all his patients with noise induced tinnitus to take Gingko Biloba and magnesium. Apparently, magnesium helps repair the nerves in the auditory pathways. I am not referring to the ear hairs attached to the cochlea.

      Audiologists and Hearing Therapists can help with tinnitus counselling and treatments like CBT, TRT and Mindfullness - depending on what services are available at the hospital you attend. They also fit hearing aids and white noise generators. Once you have an audiogram this should determine if you have any significant hearing loss and whether a hearing aid/s are required.

      Take care
      Michael
       
    27. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Ashley Ann
      Some though to consider:

      "It's what prompted my initial chiropractic visit, within which my neck was adjusted not too long before my initial onset of tinnitus. I truly believe that there's some connection! "

      I had mentioned that 99.5% of the time, tinnitus does not appear from this, but if one get tinnitus after a neck adjustment, then most likely that's cause. I said I can't say that you have hearing loss. Your hair cells could have been weaken from music, but not enough to set off tinnitus. It just may be the trigger was the neck adjustment. A neck adjustment can cause hearing loss.

      Moving on to new tone which appears to be somatic by moving neck.

      In conclusion, your mild hearing loss could be caused from neck and now with new tone - either more input from neck with tense muscles and/or jaw. Your clinking sensation when you swallow could associate to the TMJ joint. Mentioned is posture that can have a lot to do with tense muscles and jaw.

      I would get your hearing check, but I would consider getting treatment for neck , jaw and dental -molars as I detailed above to see if T improves.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    28. Kendra

      Kendra Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      08/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      SSNHL/ Acoustic Trauma
      Yes it could be. It might depend on how you slept on your jaw, if you ate any chewy foods, or clenched or grinded your teeth during the day or at night.
       
    29. Thuan

      Thuan Member

      Location:
      California
      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ear infection
      I would say a decent headphone or earplugs would be in the ballpark range. It would not be precise but you'll be able to hear some sort of sound. A good way to make sure your headphone/earplugs is producing some UHF sounds is by asking several friends or relatives to do the test and see if they can hear it too. I've asked my brother and sisters, who both have good hearing, and they both described the same sound as my good ear but with slightly lower or higher volume changes in order to hear it.

      I have not tried hearing aids because my normal hearing is decent and my audiologist says it won't help with the tinnitus because everyday sounds aren't in the ultra high frequencies range. My bad ear is slightly lower in volume than my good ear but not my much so I do believe my audiologist is right that hearing aids won't help me since hearing aids just boost up the volume of normal, everyday sounds. It's a huge bummer that hearing aids probably won't help.

      The only way I'm coping is opening all windows and welcoming as much city sound as possible to mask the tinnitus.
       
    30. Midas
      Bookworm

      Midas Member

      Location:
      BE
      Tinnitus Since:
      2004
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise
      I have the same symptoms (hissing) due to a noise exposure and I also can manipulate it (louder and higher pitch) moving my head (looking over shoulder, pushing my chin forward, clenching teeth etc). It also does this when I yawn.
      However I don't have or had any problems with my teeth or jaw.

      My ENT diagnosed it somatosensory tinnitus.

      Do you experience pain in or around your ears or headaches?
       

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