Low Pitch Ringing/Hum Went Away After Using a Mouth Guard and Regular Jaw Massage

Discussion in 'Success Stories' started by GDK, Sep 15, 2021.

    1. Benjaminbb

      Benjaminbb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Likely long term noise exposure, combined w pandemic stress
      The bent/misfiring thing is actually how any audiologist explains hearing damage. The audiologists I spoke to all seem to think tinnitus was actually the vibration of damaged hairs not the brain like other sources say. I tend to agree that there are 5+ Reasons for tinnitus and that vibrating hair is a common one for anyone that intermittent tinnitus that can be interacted with, ie by playing the tone.

      Also would say that vibrating hairs are almost definitely due to damage and trauma. That’s why given some time those heal. For example someone could be under water and with tinnitus for several weeks after someone claps loudly next to their head. But that repairs with time. The explanation for this is that the hair gets bent due to the air pressure. I think it’s a pretty legit idea.

      Also another random fact, in regards to our hums stopping from sound, it definitely stops not masked, because it takes half a second to start again afterwards. Sounds like it’s turning on and off like a switch.

      If it were to be muscle related then I think it would something in the auditory system, like a muscle that attaches to the ear drum. the theory is that can be affect by jaw and neck muscles due to where they meet. And that would also explains why sound cuts it out. It definitely sounds like a vibration like you’re saying. Almost like a trembling muscle.

      So there are arguments for both, but it’s definitely augmented by sound for all the above people. Would love to get to the bottom of it.
       
    2. Forever hopeful
      Depressed

      Forever hopeful Member

      Location:
      USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      2015 resolved, 4/20 L ear, increase 2/21
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      2015,noise,2020-21 SNHL
      I originally had tinnitus due to sound exposure. Loud AC/DC concert. No hearing loss. Tinnitus lasted for 2 years. Then resolved for about 3 years. Now I have a different issue. I have some hearing loss in my left ear. Got tinnitus and it resolved after about a year.

      Per my ENT, hair cells can be bent but not broken due damage and can heal over time.

      I also have the rumbling when I am congested. Particularly when I have a cold.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    3. Ben Winders
      Pensive

      Ben Winders Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic
      Question is - since for most of us, driving a car makes the low rumbling very loud for a couple minutes after we shut off the engine, should we stop driving? Should we do everything we can to let the bent hair cells heal?

      How I can live without driving a car, is another thing, practically.
       
    4. Thomas L

      Thomas L Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Virus/Infection
      Obviously I'm no expert but my take on this is to live as normal as possible with this condition. The body tends to be able to adapt and/or heal. I'm not saying I've stopped exploring ways of improving my quality of life but I feel like if we constraint how we live to try and let them heal but see no improvements whatsoever, I'd personally be back to a darker place than I am at now and I really do not want to go back there. It took me a lot of energy to feel a little better every day.
       
      • Like Like x 2
    5. saggy_92

      saggy_92 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown
      Hi GDK, I've exact same symptoms. Even my doctor suggested to start wearing the night guard. How much time did it take for you see the improvement after you started using the night guard?
      My symptoms
      - low humming/vibration sound.
      - If I close the ear using finger, the vibration stops.
      - When I speak, it also disappear.
      - It disappears for few seconds after moving the head and also post exercise.
      - While stretching the body, the vibration increases. I am not sure why.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    6. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      GDK

      GDK Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      TMJ. Grinding teeth
      With heat, massage, and most importantly the mouth guard, I’d say within a week to ten days it was completely gone.

      Have not heard it since. And I had it bad. I am so grateful this fixed it.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    7. saggy_92

      saggy_92 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown
      Nice. Do you have any jaw pain or any TMJ issue? I had an MRI of TMJ that didn't show anything but my doctor is suspecting the grinding is the main cause of the issue. I hadn't exposed myself to loud noise so this most probably looks like muscle related issue. Also, do you think the neck problem can also cause same symptoms?

      Also one thing I've noticed that if I spend my whole days sitting in-front of fan or may be AC, that actually disappear the humming sound for couple of hours even in silent room. The vibration will start again after couple of hours like hm...hm...hm and then it will be like hmmmmmmmmmm I am not sure why. Does it also happen with you?
       
    8. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      GDK

      GDK Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      TMJ. Grinding teeth
      I suspect there are many causes, as my original post states. I ruled out about 7 other things until I finally went to the dentist.

      Check out the original post of this thread.

      You’ll see all the things I thought it could be.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    9. Ben Winders
      Pensive

      Ben Winders Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic
      Many people (with low hum tinnitus) have this effect of LONG residual inhibition.

      I even emailed about this effect to one of the people that researched residual inhibition with tinnitus sufferers but he said he found it very peculiar that my inhibition could last for a couple hours (after being next to an AC or driving a car or being close to anything else that produces a humming sound).
       
    10. Pitseleh

      Pitseleh Member

      Location:
      France
      Tinnitus Since:
      2007
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I have 270 Hz tinnitus, which is a low tone.

      No residual inhibition affect whatsoever mine.
       
    11. saggy_92

      saggy_92 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown
      Do you actually feel the vibration physically? I can literally feel that this is happening in middle ear.
       
    12. saggy_92

      saggy_92 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown
      Yes I've possibly checked all the causes. Even I did the MRI of neck, TMJ and brain. Neck MRI showed early spondylosis due to bad posture. Not sure if that is the cause.

      Before this low humming started, I had muffled hearing for couple of weeks. Based on the symptoms doctor suspected the ETD but my eardrum and all the reports were normal so I don't think so that was ETD.

      I had on and off muffled hearing for couple of months last year but now everything is gone, just left with humming.
       
    13. Ben Winders
      Pensive

      Ben Winders Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic
      This seems like an easy question but it is a tough one.

      Since I also have actual physical fluttering (my tensor tempani fluttering) I can clearly state that my regular hum is not physical, although (here is the important part) because it is so low in frequency (around 80 Hz for me) I think our brain perceives it as actual vibrations. Because it is so deep/low.

      Try to play 80 Hz on a MacBook through MacBook speakers ... it won't even produce any sound (barely audible) because it's so low.

      Hard to explain ... but no, I don't think my hum is actual vibrations inside my ear, it's just that I perceive it to be.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    14. twa
      Busy

      twa Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      2017- mild /Sept. 2020-moderate
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      meds/acoustic trauma
      @GDK, can you tell me the type of mouth guard you wear?

      Two dentists have wanted me to have a hard plastic mouth guard, but I'd rather have a soft plastic one like used for athletics.
       
    15. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      GDK

      GDK Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      TMJ. Grinding teeth
      It’s a custom fit. Made of a fairly hard plastic, but not too hard.

      They took a mould of my top teeth, and then it was custom made.

      The mould fits tightly on my top teeth.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    16. Benjaminbb

      Benjaminbb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Likely long term noise exposure, combined w pandemic stress
      How are you doing now GDK?
       
    17. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      GDK

      GDK Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      TMJ. Grinding teeth
      Still hum free. I wear the guard every night.

      Has anyone else had any success with a mouth guard preventing the hum in their ear(s)?
       
    18. Benjaminbb

      Benjaminbb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Likely long term noise exposure, combined w pandemic stress
      Amazing. Not yet. Mine has been starting on the other side now as well as being more constant (besides noise interruptions) on the side it was on too - so might look into this.

      Seems strange to have it on both sides unless I’m experiencing some kind of cochlear hydrops, like mineares which damages low frequency part of the cochlear. There’s gotta be a cause for our unique type of tinnitus.

      GDK, yours interacted with noise like most of us correct? I.e. cuts outs or is triggered by noise.

      EDIT:

      Actually, I just re-read your first post, your dot points are exactly how I would describe mine these days too.

      Even been starting to have pain on the bad days which I actually associate with hyperacusis. However, the pain can be there for hours even without sound exposure.

      Also like you mentioned I’ve been having dramatically different good days and bad days where more volume is required to mute it etc.

      Sounds like you’ve already looked into a lot of what I’ve been thinking.

      I think I’ll look into the jaw for sure.

      I’m also with @Ben Winders that there’s a chance for a lot of us that it could simply be low frequency hearing loss - which would be sad.

      However, there are very few causes of low frequency loss besides:
      • Meniere’s (which would be accompanied vertigo)
      • Cochlear hydrops which is basically Meniere’s of the cochlea and can resolve over a few years and which is also detectable on MRI
      • Infection - which would show far more of a cookie shape than just a single low dip at 80 Hz
      • Damage from noise - possible but wouldn’t we see a ton of other frequencies damaged first?
      Either way I’ll get a extended hearing test done and let you know. @Ben Winders, have you looked into doing that yet? What are your thoughts regarding why you expect there to be a dip down there before other obvious and easily damaged frequencies?

      The only other thing that strengthens Ben’s theory vs it being a jaw thing is that a lot of us have strong reactivity to sound. When it gets bad it can literally be a footstep on a wooden floor that triggers a 15 second hum, or a car driving down the street is amplified by 20 dB in that ear. Which leads me to believe it’s a damaged receptor or some mechanism that is able to create a feedback loop. No other type of reactive tinnitus fades after the sound is removed or is triggered off by sound in this way.

      There’s also the theory that both jaw and hearing loss are right, and that even with a mild loss it’s actually a nerve disruption/pressure that is being amplified by the brain to fill in that frequency. Often with those cases once you remove the physical issue the tinnitus resolves even when the loss stays.

      I know many people with loss and no tinnitus for example, let alone a f’ing 30 dB+ sub hum.
       
    19. Benjaminbb

      Benjaminbb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Likely long term noise exposure, combined w pandemic stress
      Hey was your fleeting tinnitus lower in frequency? I’ve never had low fleeting around 800 Hz-1 kHz until this last year in which I developed the hum.
       
    20. Ben Winders
      Pensive

      Ben Winders Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      acoustic
      My fleeting episodes are always high pitched... i said before that I also hold open as an option that my low hum is a consequence of high frequency loss... I just damaged something thoroughly in there, a nerve or whatever.
       
    21. HeavyMantra
      Bugridden

      HeavyMantra Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Steadily worsening since 2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      The hard ones last way way longer, but if money isn't an issue go for a soft one.
       
    22. kelmari

      kelmari Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      High pitch 2020, rumbling 2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unsure
      Hey all, I’m new here.

      I’m dealing with this too. I actually developed high pitched tinnitus in my right ear about 1.5 years ago (this could’ve been due to a couple things like IHH or CSF leak from lumbar puncture). I managed to habituate and it didn’t seem loud anymore.

      However, in December 2021 I awoke to a blocked left ear where I couldn’t hear any external noise, only internal like my voice. I was also extremely sensitive to low sound like escalators, engines, airplanes, etc.

      I was told it was middle ear infection or ETD. During that time I had an MRI, antibiotics and anti-dizziness pills. Not long after I woke up to the vibrating/idling truck sound and sensation in my left ear. Initially it would be triggered by things and it disappeared for a few weeks but it returned again after a bout at the gym and hearing many pops/change in pressure.

      It’s now hanging around like a very unwanted guest and sometimes it can be so loud it feels like I’m going to take a stroke or something. I also sometimes get vibrations in my neck or other parts of my body like chest or limbs.

      I suspected Meniere’s Disease too but I have a number of things it could be like severe TMD. All I know is that I’m terrified every time I step into a quiet surrounding or as soon as I go to bed because it feels like my head could just fly off with the vibrations.

      It’s nice to know others are out there with similar and I’m not alone in this really awful experience.

      Kel x
       
    23. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing + Somatic tinnitus from dental work
      Hi @kelmari, as I mentioned in your introduction thread, a lumbar puncture can cause systemic disorders that can include a variety of conditions with presumed inflammatory and autoimmune path mechanisms.

      Consideration of inflammatory/autoimmune disorders may be of therapeutic and prognostic importance. In the absence of disease-specific clinical features, the initial diagnostic workup is broad. I tried in the other thread to discuss what some of path mechanisms of systemic inflammatory disorders may be as to your physical concerns.

      If you have not received follow-up after your lumbar puncture, please do. Basic blood tests include inflammatory markers and autoantibodies will be needed along with protein biomarkers and maybe have astrocytes measured by using Glial fibrillary acidic protein.

      You mentioned having a lip biopsy and I commented maybe to indicate Sjogren's syndrome which is autoimmune to detect the presence of clusters of inflammatory cells. From having this done, I assumed that you had follow-ups and monitoring and nothing concerning was found other than systemic inflammatory disorder which has taken a non-autoimmune path such as to what you describe including TMJ.

      Please don't be concerned, just consider more re-examination (if you have not received) as more inflammation meds may be needed.

      I would also consider the list of care options that I gave you.

      Write back if you wish.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    24. Benjaminbb

      Benjaminbb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Likely long term noise exposure, combined w pandemic stress
      Just got mine, surprisingly tight and hard.

      Feels more like it’s going to increase the contact and consequently tension of my TMJ joint.

      Is yours the hard clear plastic? I can see how this would protect teeth but not much more.
       
    25. Simona
      Sleepy

      Simona Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      @GDK
      I find your approach to explaining the humming very interesting and after trying countless other therapies I will also see a dentist. I would be interested to know if the dentist was able to determine that you grind your teeth by looking at the wear and tear on your teeth? Or how did he recognise that you needed a mouth guard?
       
    26. Benjaminbb

      Benjaminbb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Likely long term noise exposure, combined w pandemic stress
      Your muffled hearing came on spontaneously with no noise exposure?
       
    27. Benjaminbb

      Benjaminbb Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2020
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Likely long term noise exposure, combined w pandemic stress
      @Ben Winders, how’s your humming these days? Are you still using that YouTube video at night to get daily inhibition?

      Do you have fluctuating volume during the day or is it still triggered by driving etc?
       
    28. Simona
      Sleepy

      Simona Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2014
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I continue to be unsure whether or not I'm clenching my teeth at night or not.

      Nevertheless, I had personalized mouth guards made based on my dental impressions, i.e. "simple" mouth guards in different degrees of hardness, which are used in the upper jaw and are intended exclusively to protect the teeth. I wore all the models at night for several weeks. In addition, during this time I underwent special physiotherapy for the jaw.

      Unfortunately, I could not observe any improvement. I don't know if it is due to the type of the mouth guard i.e. if the model used by GDK was even more special, as there seem to be many different models. Some have to be made by absolute specialists, based on scans and special measurements, etc. - which can be quite expensive. I am now not sure whether I should pursue this direction at all, since neither the mouth guard, nor the therapy led to an improvement.

      What experience have you gained in the meantime?
       
    29. Marshall

      Marshall Member

      Location:
      ND
      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2021
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Not sure/virus/noise trauma/cumulative noise damage
      I have a hum in a frequency that I’ve been tested for and have no hearing loss in.
       
    30. Frayact

      Frayact Member

      Location:
      Greensboro, NC
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      I've posted this on many other threads, but I also have a loud low-frequency hum. It started from out of the blue in the Summer of 1996. I also have a high-pitched hissing that started a few months earlier, but that rarely bothers me. The humming has gotten so bad over the years that I've considered suicide.

      When it first began, I had every medical test known to man performed (MRI's, hearing exams, dental, etc.). I even went to an orthodontist who stuck his fingers in my mouth and squeezed various parts of my soft palate while asking, "Do you still hear the hum?" (I did). But of course, no one could find any abnormalities. In 1999, I reluctantly got on an antidepressant (Effexor XR) as I couldn't cope anymore. Within a few weeks, the humming disappeared. I assumed it was all psychosomatic and not physical. But the silence only lasted about a year before the hum returned one morning. I tried other ADs, but none worked. I eventually got on Lexapro and stayed on that one for almost 15 years

      Up until March 27 of 2022, I had been hum-free for nearly four years. But then it returned and sent me into absolute depression hell. As I write this, I've been on a newer AD (Pristiq) for about a month, but I've felt no changes.

      I don't grind my teeth, so it's unlikely a mouth guard would be beneficial.

      My hum also stops when I shake my head in a sideways motion. Sticking my fingers in my ears or cupping my palm over them creates the seashell effect. But when I remove my fingers, the humming is even louder.

      The biggest mystery for me (in addition to what's causing it) is why it will go away for years and then return for no apparent reason. I can have a full life when it's gone, but when it comes back, everything changes. I feel vulnerable, trapped, and full of dread. Trying to sleep at night is nearly impossible. I can also FEEL the hum in addition to hearing it. It's a horrible vibration, the kind you feel when riding on a prop plane.

      I suppose it's similar to people who have cancer and manage to beat it after chemo and other treatments - there's always the fear that it will return. With tinnitus, there is no approved treatment. That's where part of the helpless feelings come into play.
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
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