Melatonin Might Be Beneficial, Especially in Preventing Hearing Loss?

Discussion in 'Treatments' started by Markku, May 18, 2012.

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Do you take melatonin?

  1. Yes, daily

  2. Yes, every now and then

  3. No, and I'm not planning to

  4. No, but I'm thinking about starting

Results are only viewable after voting.
tinnitus forum
    1. Markku
      Inspired

      Markku Director Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing
      Melatonin seems to be a worthwhile supplement, especially if one is taking drugs that are classified ototoxic... Maybe I should start taking it too, I have briefly in the past, but only for few weeks... (to help sleep issues, and it did help.)



      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21673362
      Drug-mediated ototoxicity and tinnitus: alleviation with melatonin.

      Abstract
      This review evaluates the published basic science and clinical reports related to the role of melatonin in reducing the side effects of aminoglycosides and the cancer chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, in the cochlea and vestibule of the inner ear. A thorough search of the literature was performed using available databases for the purpose of uncovering articles applicable to the current review. Cochlear function was most frequently evaluated by measuring otoacoustic emissions and their distortion products after animals were treated with cytotoxic drugs alone or in combination with melatonin. Vestibular damage due to aminoglycosides was evaluated by estimating hair cell loss in explanted utricles of newborn rats. Tinnitus was assessed in patients who received melatonin using a visual analogue scale or the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. Compared to a mixture of antioxidants which included tocopherol, ascorbate, glutathione and N-acetyl-cysteine, melatonin, also a documented antioxidant, was estimated to be up to 150 times more effective in limiting the cochlear side effects, evaluated using otoacoustic emission distortion products, of gentamicin, tobramycin and cisplatin. In a dose-response manner, melatonin also reduced vestibular hair cell loss due to gentamicin treatment in explanted utricles of newborn rats. Finally, melatonin (3 mg daily) limited subjective tinnitus in patients. These findings suggest the potential use of melatonin to combat the ototoxicity of aminoglycosides and cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Additional studies at both the experimental and clinical levels should be performed to further document the actions of melatonin at the cochlear and vestibular levels to further clarify the protective mechanisms of action of this ubiquitously-acting molecule. Melatonin's low cost and minimal toxicity profile supports its use to protect the inner ear from drug-mediated damage.



      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21859051
      Melatonin: can it stop the ringing?

      OBJECTIVES: We sought to report the efficacy of oral melatonin as treatment for chronic tinnitus and to determine whether particular subsets of tinnitus patients have greater benefit from melatonin therapy than others.

      METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, crossover clinical trial in an ambulatory tertiary referral otology and neurotology practice. Adults with chronic tinnitus were randomized to 3 mg melatonin or placebo nightly for 30 days followed by a 1-month washout period. Each group then crossed into the opposite treatment arm for 30 days. The tests audiometric tinnitus matching (TM), Tinnitus Severity Index (TSI), Self Rated Tinnitus (SRT), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered at the outset and every 30 days thereafter to assess the effects of each intervention.

      RESULTS: A total of 61 subjects completed the study. A significantly greater decrease in TM and SRT scores (p < 0.05) from baseline was observed after treatment with melatonin relative to the effect observed with placebo. Male gender, bilateral tinnitus, noise exposure, no prior tinnitus treatment, absence of depression and/or anxiety at baseline, and greater pretreatment TSI scores were associated with a positive response to melatonin. Absence of depression and/or anxiety at baseline, greater pretreatment TSI scores, and greater pretreatment SRT scores were found to be positively associated with greater likelihood of improvement in both tinnitus and sleep with use of melatonin (p<0.05).

      CONCLUSIONS: Melatonin is associated with a statistically significant decrease in tinnitus intensity and improved sleep quality in patients with chronic tinnitus. Melatonin is most effective in men, those without a history of depression, those who have not undergone prior tinnitus treatments, those with more severe and bilateral tinnitus, and those with a history of noise exposure.



      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11893449
      The role of free oxygen radicals in noise induced hearing loss: effects of melatonin and methylprednisolone.

      Abstract

      The aim of this study was to investigate the role of cochlear damage caused by free oxygen radicals occurring as a result of exposure to noise and to determine the prophylactic effects of melatonin and methylprednisolone. Fifty male albino guinea pigs were randomly divided into five groups. All groups were exposed to 60 h of continuous wide band noise at 100+/-2 dB, except group I. Group I was not exposed to noise or treated with drugs. Group II was exposed to noise and not treated with drugs. Group III was exposed to noise and treated with melatonin. Group IV was exposed to noise and treated with methylprednisolone. Group V was exposed to noise and treated with melatonin and methylprednisolone. A high dose of 40 mg/kg methylprednisolone and/or 20 mg/kg melatonin were administered intramuscularly 24 h before exposure to noise, immediately before noise exposure and once a day until noise exposure was completed. Just after the noise ended, guinea pigs were decapitated. Venous blood was obtained into tubes with EDTA and it was used to measure activity levels of plasma malondialdehyde, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and the cochlear tissue malondialdehyde. After the noise ended, in comparison group II with I; it was found that the malondialdehyde activity of the plasma and tissue had increased, the erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity levels had decreased and consequently, hearing thresholds had increased (P<0.01). A significant difference was found in the malondialdehyde and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity levels between groups II and III (P<0.01) and the hearing thresholds exhibited a parallel trend (P<0.05). The hearing threshold and malondialdehyde activity levels obtained from groups IV and V were found to be similar to those of group II (P>0.05). As a conclusion, we suggest that the use of methlyprednisolone in order to prevent the cochlear damage caused by noise does not provide sufficient prophylaxy, however the use of melatonin provides a more effective prophylaxy, thus being a promising alternative.



      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21970786
      Correlation between plasma levels of radical scavengers and hearing threshold among elderly subjects with age-related hearing loss.

      CONCLUSION: Low plasma melatonin is significant in the development of high frequency hearing loss (HL) among the elderly.

      OBJECTIVE: To determine the correlation between hearing threshold and the plasma melatonin and ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

      METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 126 apparently healthy elderly subjects, 59 males and 67 females, aged >60 years. Subjects underwent pure tone audiometry and plasma melatonin and vitamin C were assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography.

      RESULTS: The mean ± SD of plasma melatonin among the subjects with normal hearing (NH) (0-30 dB) and those with HL in the speech frequencies was 18.3 ± 3.6 μg/L and 16.4 ± 4.7 μg/L, respectively. In the high frequencies the values were 17.7 ± 6.2 μg/L and 13.1 ± 6.4 μg/L for NH and HL, respectively. For vitamin C, the mean ± SD among subjects with NH and those with HL in the speech frequencies were 1.2 ± 0.2 μg/L and 1.0 ± 0.1 μg/L, respectively. In the high frequencies, the values were 1.0 ± 0.2 μg/L and 0.9 ± 0.3 μg/L for NH and HL, respectively. Among subjects with high frequency HL, Spearman's correlation revealed significant correlation between increasing hearing threshold and melatonin (correlation coefficient = -0.30, p = 0.01), but not for vitamin C (correlation coefficient = -0.12, p = 0.22). Linear regression, adjusting for age, still revealed significant correlation between the melatonin (correlation coefficient = -0.03, p = 0.00) and hearing threshold in the high frequencies.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    2. exodus
      Cold

      exodus Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2008
      hi markku

      thanks for the info.
      i ve one question about the daily dose?what should be the daily dose for having an effect on the t?

      thanks
       
    3. mock turtle

      mock turtle Member

      Location:
      puget sound
      Tinnitus Since:
      07/26/1992...habituated after 2 years; 11/04/11 new outbreak
      Markku

      i so wish i knew that anti oxidants given in strong dose right after loud noise exposure would mitigate hearing damage

      and amazingly some of these substances like aspiring and melatonin confirm some protection when administered ototoxic medications

      amazing

      i always seem to have to learn things the hard way...thanks for the information

      -----

      exodus

      melatonin is reputed to be very safe

      it has an extraordinarily high LD-50...that is to say that at doses many many times the therapeutic level , few if any of the test rats died ! ;)

      i have known people who have taken many times the recommended dose for over a year with no apparent problem

      having said that i would encourage caution in that melatonin is a hormone and thus one should tread as lightly as possible down such a path...and the good news is low doses are very effective

      i myself take 3 to 6 milligrams to aid in sleep...i avoid the timed release tabs cause i have experienced grogginess during the day from that preparation..though i know people who claim timed release is the way to go to stay asleep all night

      i take two pills an hour apart with a snack in between and that does the trick...better sleep definitely reduces (but does not eliminate) my T...or maybe it reduces my stress and fatigue and so im better able to cope...who knows...T is so subjective

      best wishes to all
       
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    4. Markku
      Inspired

      Markku Director Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing
    5. tweak

      tweak Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      03/12
      So if you were taking this then it would be better to take a it night time? But if you were taking this everyday then maybe it would be hard to sleep when you dont take it?
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    6. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      I do 3mg on occasion when I feel I need a good rest for a busy day and although I don't notice a decrease initially, it helps me sleep much better and I wake up with low T.
       
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    7. calin
      Inspired

      calin Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      Oct 2011
      Yes... I was taking it daily at bedtime, but I think I missed a day or two recently.

      I take about 1/4 teaspoon of liquid melatonin and it is fast effecting. I don't drink , so it hits me pretty quick. The daily dosage before bed is 2 teaspoons. I think the bottle said 3mg... can't remember. I am still using the same bottle now for about 4-5 months.
       
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    8. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      Yes I also use liquid and it works extremely fast for me. Melatonin is pretty cheap and effective. Melatonin is perhaps one of the only supplements of benefit and I have tried at least 30
       
      • Like Like x 1
    9. Sandyleeo

      Sandyleeo Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2010
      Hello all,

      I'm the newbie on the block last check, and have been checking out a number of threads since joining June 9 [my time and date...]. Just added my vote to the poll at the top of this thread and will follow with this comment.

      i've been taking melatonin consistently for over a year and it does seem to help with my sleep. Haven't noticed any definite association with my tinnitus but i'm not really very thorough/compulsive with tracking that --it comes and goes throughout the day and i mostly find a way to ignore it. As i write, it is active in both ears.

      i use the Schiff product which contains 3mg of Mela, plus 25mg L-Theanine (whatever that is), 25mg GABA (seems to be good for whatever ails ya) and some B-6 and calcium for good measure. Bought it mainly since Costco carries it and i happen to like other Schiff products. I follow their suggested dosage of 1 pill nightly at bedtime. That's the extent of my endorsement for what it's worth.

      lee
       
    10. Peter Phua
      Breezy

      Peter Phua Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      I believe there was a also a trial indicating that N-acetylcysteine oral supplements could prevent the excitotoxcity that kills cochlear cells in the immediate aftermath of loud noise exposure, thereby preventing noise induced tinnitus.
       
    11. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      • Like Like x 2
    12. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      I wonder if taking Melatonin with an ototoxic drug would limit the damage to the hairs.
       
    13. mike

      mike Member

      Location:
      Franklin ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      1 1/2 months
      Is melatonin good or bad for you .Just trying to see what people think. It helps me sleep?????
       
    14. carlover
      English

      carlover Member Benefactor

      Location:
      London
      Tinnitus Since:
      1986
      Hi Mike ,so are you saying it does help you sleep or will it help you sleep?

      Ive never tried it ,but only downer I can find is it may keep you drowsy during the day and to start with 1mg see how it goes and working up to 3mg if its not helping.
      Good Luck ,Pete
       
    15. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      Melatonin is considered safe. I used it for about 2 months in the beginning with my T and it really did help me sleep. I took liquid version 1/2-1 dropper, 30 minutes before I went to bed.
       
    16. carlover
      English

      carlover Member Benefactor

      Location:
      London
      Tinnitus Since:
      1986
      Hi Erik,how come you stopped ,can you deal with your T better now?

      Best,Pete
       
    17. Karen
      Talkative

      Karen Manager Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Ambassador

      Location:
      U.S.
      Tinnitus Since:
      05/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      First time: Noise 2nd Time: Ototoxic drug
      Mike --- I've been taking melatonin off and on for many months now. As Erik says, it is considered safe, and some say it may even help with tinnitus. I usually take 3 milligrams about 30 minutes to an hour before bedtime. It is gentle, and works subtly. For me at least, I do not wake up feeling groggy at all. You could consider starting with a very low dose (1 milligram) and see how it affects you. Then, if it works for you, you can begin taking 3 mg., and it is OK to take up to 6 mg. (My doctor said that up to 9 mg. is OK, but I've never tried that).

      Hope it works for you!
       
      • Like Like x 1
    18. Markku
      Inspired

      Markku Director Staff Benefactor Hall of Fame Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Syringing
      It's also possible to start with even lower dose than 1 mg.

      http://www.iherb.com/Life-Extension-Melatonin-300-mcg-100-Capsules/5273

      Some find 300 mcg better even than higher dosages.

      http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2001/may2001_products.html

      In response to several studies showing that doses as low as 300 micrograms of melatonin can induce an enhanced state of drowsiness and provide a better quality of sleep, The Life Extension Buyers Club is offering members the option of using very low-dose melatonin supplements. For those who have tried higher dose melatonin supplements and not found effective relief from insomnia, these lower dose supplements may prove effective.
       
    19. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      Hey Pete, I stopped because I no longer need it to sleep. I sleep fine about 80% of the time which is probably about as good as I slept prior to T. However I would not hesitate to take it again if I thought it was needed. I'm just a better able to cope now than I did in the beginning so that's why I can sleep now. It has been almost been 6 months and of all the treatments I've done over the months, the passage of time has been the most help.
       
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    20. carlover
      English

      carlover Member Benefactor

      Location:
      London
      Tinnitus Since:
      1986

      Hiya Erik.Great your dealing with it best you can,Best,Pete
       
    21. mike

      mike Member

      Location:
      Franklin ohio
      Tinnitus Since:
      1 1/2 months
      Fact Sheet: Melatonin

      4_005_MelatoninSleepDanger_MEDIA.jpg
      Melatonin is a hormone that helps you fall asleep. It has been taken for years as a supplement to assist with sleep; however, some doctors suggest that we are sabotaging our sleep by overusing it.

      Melatonin is a natural, non-addicting hormone supplement that assists with sleep. Millions of people in the United States take it in order to get a good night’s sleep after having difficulties falling asleep or staying asleep. However, beware! Melatonin may be harmful to your sleep if taken inappropriately.

      Melatonin is naturally produced in your brain. It tells your body that it’s nighttime and it’s time to go to bed. Melatonin is a powerful hormone. Many may mistake its power for that of a sleeping pill and feel compelled to take more for better sleep. However, at the wrong dosage, melatonin may actually destroy your sleep cycle. Too much melatonin at one time may also cause headaches, nausea, dizziness, or irritability.

      When should you take melatonin?

      If you know you’re going to have a major shift in sleep schedule: Because of how melatonin works, it can be beneficial for those who know they will be up late for a few nights in a row and know they will have trouble getting back to their normal sleep schedule. It also works well for jetlag.

      If you’re over 60 years old and are having trouble sleeping: Your body makes less melatonin as you age, so your body may need more assistance with melatonin to help you sleep better.

      When shouldn’t you take melatonin?

      If you can’t sleep because of issues like stress, depression or anxiety: Melatonin may not work in those cases because the problem doesn’t lie with the body’s ability to make its own melatonin. You may benefit from practicing Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) to calm your body and distract your brain.

      If you have already taken melatonin earlier that evening: Because it is so powerful, too much melatonin may actually disrupt your sleeping pattern, which may lead to your waking up in the middle of the night. Some people complain of a “melatonin hangover,” which may lead to them feeling even more groggy and unrested! This happens because any residual melatonin in your system in the morning will make your body think it’s still nighttime – and it will be even harder to wake up.
       
    22. Goofy
      Goofy

      Goofy Member

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2013
      Does anyone know if melatonin can make T worse?After I got home from HBOT my T was at a low level and a couple days later I started taking melatonin so I could get a good nights sleep. I don’t know if it is a coincident but that is the same time my T increased and has not lowered for a week now. I am going to stop the melatonin for a couple of days and see what happens.
       
    23. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      Hi Goofy,

      I took melatonin for about 5 months after the onset of my T and I didn't experience any increases during that time. However, it was early on and my T fluctuated quite a bit so you may just be going thru a temporary spike.
       
    24. Goofy
      Goofy

      Goofy Member

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2013
      Erik,
      Before HBOT my T was up for a day or so and then back down. So far this is the longest spike (7days now) I have had and I am worried it is not going to go back down. I am trying to stay positive that it will lower again.
       
    25. erik
      Breezy

      erik Manager Staff Benefactor

      Location:
      Washington State, USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/2012
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Most likely hearing loss
      Yes, stay positive, keep yourself busy....it will return to baseline
       
    26. J M

      J M Member

      Location:
      USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      2012
      The first time I tried melatonin, it made my T go crazy in my left ear.

      I tried it again a few weeks later, and never had a problem with it again...no vivid dreams either.
       
    27. Goofy
      Goofy

      Goofy Member

      Location:
      US
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2013
      I think I will avoid it for a while. My left ear hurts today and I feel like I have sinus pressure maybe. I took a benadryl so see if that helps.
       
    28. J M

      J M Member

      Location:
      USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      2012
      By the way, melatonin can increase your blood sugar if you are diabetic.
       
    29. carlover
      English

      carlover Member Benefactor

      Location:
      London
      Tinnitus Since:
      1986
    30. david c

      david c Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2012
      Interesting read - I've taken melatonin regularly for the last few months. It helps with sleep and is less addictive than many other sleep aids so for that reason alone I think is worth recommending. I think it probably does have a small impact on the tinnitus though largely connected with its sleep functions. Anyway I think - given it is relatively inexpensive - it's at least worth trying.
       

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