Otonomy OTO-413 — Treatment of Hidden Hearing Loss

Discussion in 'Research News' started by Michael Larsen, Jan 9, 2018.

    1. d'Wooluf

      d'Wooluf Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown
      Formal musical training is believed by some to improve speech understanding. Google 'auditory training'.
       
    2. Diesel

      Diesel Member Benefactor Ambassador Hall of Fame Advocate

      Tinnitus Since:
      1-2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      20+ Years of Live Music, Motorcycles, and Power Tools
      When I Googled "auditory training", the entire first page has topics on training hearing when hearing aids are required, or therapies involving hearing loss where hearing aids are not yet required. Nothing relating to music, musicians, singing, musical instruments, or anything of the like.

      There is evidence that formal musician training helps musicians to better pick out and interpret voices in a noisy environment. It turns out it has to do more with their brain’s ability to interpret minimal instrument signal in a noisy environment.

      Personally knowing several musicians and learning of their experience with hearing loss/tinnitus, it seems like @tommyd87 may also have a good explanation for excluding musicians. Perhaps it is both?
       
    3. d'Wooluf

      d'Wooluf Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2010
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown
      When the topic of auditory training has come up in other places a common response has been you'd be better off doing formal musical training. A similar goal but musical training works better. That's the tenuous link.

      Musical Training for Auditory Rehabilitation in Hearing Loss

      They would exclude a violinist in a string quartet for noise exposure but take a drummer in a rock band?
       
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