Where to Find High Frequency Range Hearing Test?

Discussion in 'Support' started by leftearguy, May 9, 2020.

    1. leftearguy

      leftearguy Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/10/20
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Weed, Hidden Hearing Loss
      A couple nights ago I wore closed back over ear headphones for about 2 hours until I felt a pop in my left ear. The static that I've been hearing in my head for a while has been a good bit louder since. I feel pressure in my left ear and it seems like I can change the tone by moving my neck and jaw. I'm just hoping that it's not caused by hearing damage.

      I want to get to an ENT or audiologist, but I want to make sure that the audio range for the test will be closer to 20kHz instead of only 8kHz. I'd like a speech in noise test too to check for hidden hearing loss.

      Does anyone have any advice for finding a place that provides these? I'm trying to not be too nervous but I just have in the back of my head that this could possibly be an emergency but I'm not even sure if I have more hearing loss right now. I'm hoping that it's really been slowly fading over the last couple of days but I can't be too sure.
       
    2. Orions Pain
      Dreaming

      Orions Pain Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud music
      I've seen people on here mention research Universities are likely to have these sorts of tests. Not sure where you're located geographically, but for example here in California we have a bunch, Stanford, Berkeley, etc. Simplest thing to do would just be to call around and ask, perhaps start with audiology offices and go from there.
       
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      leftearguy

      leftearguy Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/10/20
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Weed, Hidden Hearing Loss
      Thank you. I might have to just call around and ask if they do over 8khz. Can I just ask you, do you know anything about how somatic tinnitus might indicate what it's caused by? For example, is it common to have tinnitus caused by hearing loss that can be modulated by moving the neck and jaw? Would it be a sign that it is not caused by hearing loss or is it possible anyway?
       
      • Like Like x 1
    4. Orions Pain
      Dreaming

      Orions Pain Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud music
      I don’t think it’s uncommon to have tinnitus that can be modulated by moving the neck and jaw.

      For example, I’m 99% sure my tinnitus is from noise damage, but when I yawn it always gets a bit louder. When I open my jaw, I hear a super super faint increase in one of my tones, but I don’t think this necessarily counts as “somatic tinnitus”

      I’ve spoken with a person who could press down on a portion of their neck, and in doing so she could make her tinnitus stop completely. This case clearly indicates somatic tinnitus. I also spoke with a guy on Twitter who got his neck adjusted and his tinnitus completely went away.

      If you suspect yours stems from neck/jaw issues, it wouldn’t hurt to look into seeing a TMJ specialist, getting your neck checked out, etc. It’s kind of a process of elimination. From what I’ve seen if it’s a TMJ issue, it can either be a super easy fix (mouth guard/split) or not so easy (many struggle with TMD for life)

      Also I’d say just because you may have hearing loss in the higher frequencies, that doesn’t necessarily rule out other causes for your tinnitus. I’d say most people probably lose some of their high frequency hearing by a certain age. So while yes, high frequency hearing loss can be the answer for some, even a majority, it’s all somewhat of a mystery.

      Not claiming all of the above is correct, just my opinion based on information I’ve gathered!
       
      • Informative Informative x 1
    5. Bartoli

      Bartoli Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2009,worsened 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise
      Most hospitals can test high frequencies but you'll have to request. They don't normally do it, except for cancer patients on certain drugs known to cause hearing loss. That way they can prevent the losses spreading to the <8000 Hz range.
      Still, it's good knowing, even if they can't change anything in terms of treatments based on your extended audiogram.
       

Share This Page

Loading...