Donkey Milk

Discussion in 'Alternative Treatments and Research' started by Ornitoring, Feb 27, 2014.

tinnitus forum
    1. Ornitoring

      Ornitoring Member

      Location:
      Catalonia
      Tinnitus Since:
      2001
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma for repitition
      Seems that in hyperacusis we have a permanent cochlear nerve damage.
      Donkey milk is rich in essential aminoacids...could be useful for regenerated nerve damage?

      I drink sometimes but I should drink more often...
       
    2. Magpie
      Sporty

      Magpie Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/1999
      .

      Not that I'm aware of. I had hyperacusis for many years but I no longer have. Gradual desensitisation is what happened. I do have permanent damage to the hair cells as a result of excessive hydrops.
       
    3. Ornitoring

      Ornitoring Member

      Location:
      Catalonia
      Tinnitus Since:
      2001
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma for repitition
      Hi Magpie, in "hyperacusis reserach" I have read: the results suggest a role for cochlear primary neuronal degeneration.

      Gradual desensitisation or gradual nerve regeneration?

      You have the text here:

      Hyperacusis Research Lunch with Charlie Liberman, Ann Hickox, and Amanda Lauer at ARO 2014

      The first hyperacusis discussions were with Charlie Liberman (Professor of Otology and Laryngology at Harvard Medical School), Ann Hickox (Postdocto...ral Research Associate at Purdue University), Amanda Lauer (Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), and Hyperacusis Research supporters Ken Devore and Kimberlie Hamilton. Professor Liberman and Ann Hickox published a paper last year titled: “Is noise-induced cochlear neuropathy key to the generation of hyperacusis or tinnitus?” In the paper, they describe recent work in animals which has shown that a “neuropathic” noise exposure can cause immediate, permanent degeneration of the cochlear nerve despite complete threshold recovery and lack of hair cell damage. They show that mice with cochlear neuropathy displayed hyper-responsivity to sound, evidenced by enhanced ASR (Acoustic Startle Reflex) and PPI, while exposed mice without neuronal loss showed control-like responses. Gap PPI tests, often used to assess tinnitus, revealed limited gap detection deficits in mice with cochlear neuropathy only for certain gap-startle latencies, inconsistent with the presence of tinnitus “filling in the gap”. Despite significantly reduced wave 1 of the auditory brainstem response, representing cochlear nerve activity, later peaks were unchanged or enhanced, suggesting compensatory neural hyperactivity in the auditory brainstem. Considering the rapid post-exposure onset of both cochlear neuropathy and exaggerated startle-based behavior, the results suggest a role for cochlear primary neuronal degeneration, per se, in the central neural excitability that could underlie the generation of hyperacusis. Charlie Liberman also presented on this topic at ARO with a talk on: “Primary Degeneration of the Cochlear Nerve in Noise and Aging: Putting the “Neural” Back in Sensorineural Hearing Loss.” These works show that the synaptic ribbon fibers that connect the hair cells to the auditory pathway can be damaged and the hair cells survive and more importantly, this type of damage is typically not detectable with normal auditory tests.

      To summarize, it is probable that some hyperacusis patients have this type of neural damage in the cochlear hair cells and this damage contributes to hyper-responsivity to sound. All of the researchers were very interested in learning more about patients who suffer significant pain from hyperacusis. Charlie, Ann, and Amanda felt that there should be at least 2 categories of hyperacusis – one with and one without pain. Charlie thinks the pain may come from type II fibers which may transmit pain signals to various parts of the brain from the cochlea.

      One possible diagnostic test that may help differentiate levels of hyperacusis better than the subjective LDL testing is reaction time. Amanda Lauer published a paper in 2007 titled: “Evidence of Hyperacusis in Canaries with Permanent Hereditary High-Frequency Hearing Loss.” The abstract states the following: “The mechanisms that underlie hyperacusis are poorly understood, due in part to the lack of a behavioral animal model. Traditional self-report methods used to measure loudness and loudness discomfort are not suitable for use with animals because the animals cannot provide subjective responses about the magnitude of an internal psychological perception. Instead, reaction time (RT) measures have been used in animals to estimate loudness perception. In the present study, the authors demonstrate that RTs are shorter at moderate and high sound levels in canaries of a strain with a hereditary high-frequency hearing loss than in normal canaries, indicating increased loudness. As far as we know, this is the first report of hyperacusis in a nonhuman animal and demonstrates that RT is a potentially useful measure in animal models of hyperacusis.” Hyperacusis Research would like to see additional testing for reaction time with hyperacusis patients to move to a more objective measure which could possibly better differentiate levels of hyperacusis.

      Pictured: Ken Devore, Bryan Pollard, Charlie Liberman, Amanda Lauer, Ann Hickox
       
    4. daedalus

      daedalus Member

      Location:
      Brussels
      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2007
      Erm, i usually leave this section of the forum alone but... the title of this thread is Donkey milk (female).

      <_<

      >_>

      Why did you mention "female" ? What is then Donkey milk (male) ?
       
      • Funny Funny x 2
    5. Magpie
      Sporty

      Magpie Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/15/1999

      Interesting Ornitoring. I think there are many things we don't know about tinnitus and hyperacusis. I do know that I experienced pain with my hyperacusis, I have hearing loss in the lower frequencies. I had various tests: ABR's, ENG, ECOG, MRI. My hyperacusis resolved itself over a period of ~ 6 years but certain sounds are still painfull.
       
    6. Hudson
      Cowboy

      Hudson Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      2003
      I like that the title of this thread had to specify "female" donkey milk.

      Meet the Parents - Milking a Cat
       
      • Funny Funny x 1
    7. Shambles

      Shambles Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Jan 2012
      You know you are not spending your time correctly in dealing with your tinnitus when you are discussing drinking donkey milk. Try to look at things more positively. Giraffe piss anybody? - lots of antioxidants to get those nuerons firing.
       
      • Funny Funny x 1
    8. Ornitoring

      Ornitoring Member

      Location:
      Catalonia
      Tinnitus Since:
      2001
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma for repitition
      Looks better
       
    9. Ornitoring

      Ornitoring Member

      Location:
      Catalonia
      Tinnitus Since:
      2001
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma for repitition
      I don't know Shambles, you know?
      In Pubmed you can find a lot of scientific studies about donkey milk properties and some indications for disesases. Also for Mare's milk or camel milk.
      Not exist any study correlating Tinnitus-Donkey milk.. but means nothing. I know some people who drinks this milk who have anothers diseases and get better. Why not in tinnitus?

      I know that donkey milk sounds strange but it perhaps help in the recuperation.

      In addition this animals are very smart and lovely !

      I'm nutritionist.
       
    10. Piper the great
      Amused

      Piper the great Member

      Location:
      Grand Prairie, Texas
      Tinnitus Since:
      8/2012
      Pass on the Giraffe Piss... shaken not stirred....:)
       
    11. Shambles

      Shambles Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Jan 2012
      my apologies Ornitorning..perhaps it can help..i was just feeling exasperated at the many, many suggestions..all of which have so far done absolutely nothing for my tinnitus..im feel very hopeless right now..:(
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    12. carlover
      English

      carlover Member Benefactor

      Location:
      London
      Tinnitus Since:
      1986
      Get yourself a download of a Donkey braying ,its by far the best masker ive come across.
       
      • Funny Funny x 2
    13. Steve H
      Creative

      Steve H Director Staff Benefactor Team Trobalt Team Tech Team Awareness Team Research

      Location:
      York, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      2003
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Flu, Noise-induced, Jaw trauma
      2 birds with one stone - Milk a male donkey and you'll get plenty of braying.
       
      • Funny Funny x 2
    14. Ornitoring

      Ornitoring Member

      Location:
      Catalonia
      Tinnitus Since:
      2001
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma for repitition
      No problem, I can understand you... but I think we have to discovered things and be optimist
       

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