Learning About "Tonic Tensor Tympani Syndrome" Greatly Reduced Ear Pain and Hyperacusis

Discussion in 'Support' started by sjtinguy, Mar 23, 2018.

    1. sjtinguy

      sjtinguy Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise
      For me, one of the most frustrating things about my hearing damage is the extreme sensitivity to sounds. Loud sounds will increase the volume of my tinnitus, so I started wearing hearing protection everywhere and avoiding loud places. This seemed to cause a negative feedback loop where I started becoming sensitive to even moderately loud sounds.

      My ears would always feel painful and tight, and I would be constantly trying to "pop" my ears. Anything that would cause my ears to feel pain would make me super anxious, and I would focus on it and not be able to relax, convinced that every time I felt pain, that I had somehow done more damage.

      I mentioned this to both of the audiologists I had seen, and neither of them told me about Tonic Tensor Tympani Syndrome (TTTS). I really wish they had, because once I learned about it, it became much easier to not focus on the ear pain. Basically, your ear tenses up due to the perception of loud noise, or even sometimes the anticipation of the noise. When you have hyperacusis, everything seems too loud, so your brain is on overdrive trying to protect your hearing, and so the muscles in your ear which normally only are used when things are very loud become overworked, which can lead to pain and other odd sensations.

      This article is what really helped me.. in particular, this sentence was really helpful: "It does not harm the ear to experience TTTS, and even though the TTTS symptoms can seem as if the ear is being damaged by some sounds, this is not the case."

      Just learning about the reason for the pain, and learning that pain does not necessarily mean damage was caused, really helped me relax and not stress out when my ears felt weird. I still feel ear pain sensations from time to time, but I do not obsess over them.

      This has build into a *positive* feedback loop, where because I'm NOT obsessing over it, and can reassure myself that it's just my muscles being tense, I can relax and the symptoms tend to go away quickly. Being less scared of every sound also seems to have brought my hyperacusis down somewhat.. before I learned this, life just seemed really LOUD, but now things seem a lot more normal. I still have sensitivity to louder sounds wear hearing protection in loud and/or unpredictable environments, but I feel like things are settling down a lot more. I wish I had known about this earlier!

      Here's the link to the article I read that really helped me: http://www.hyperacusis.net/other-factors/tensor-tympani-syndrome/
       
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    2. Gman
      No Mood

      Gman Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ototoxic earwax drops, worsened by MDs (Muppet Doctors)
      Totally agree with you @sjtinguy. I feel like an absolute idiot for not working it out earlier, although I had hoped seeking professional audiological care would lead to a diagnosis, but no. An audiologist gave me sound tolerance tests and tympanometry when they should not have, even though I clearly described my symptoms. They made it worse.

      Really, should we have to diagnose ourselves? Are these professionals that moronic and clueless? As far as I'm concerned all but a fraction are a waste of time. I would only trust specialist experts like these: http://www.dineenwestcottmoore.com.au/specialist-services/acoustic-shock#what-is-as/

      @Greg Sacramento put me onto that hyperacusis.net link and it all clicked into place for me. Just to know it isn't causing further damage is empowering. Things are beginning to turn around slowly. I know for a fact I have TTTS and maybe ASD (they are linked anyway). I am able to treat myself both from a psychological point of view, but also via sound desensitisation. Who needs these incompetent professionals? I've had enough of all of them, not just audiologists. ENTs too with their beloved microsuction, which is something you DON'T do to someone with TTTS or ASD, especially after they describe their symptoms.

      I have some very effective benzos on stand by in case my symptoms cascade into a horrible situation. So far have only had to take them once. In fact, when I feel my middle ears start to seize up, it helps knowing that I could just take one and it will go away. The mere thought of taking them relaxes me, so I don't end up needing to. It's quite bizarre how it's psychosomatic and can be controlled by positive thinking, well, to an extent.
      Lately, my T has been better and even my H has improved.
       
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    3. Samir
      Obedient

      Samir Manager Staff Benefactor Ambassador Advocate

      Location:
      Sweden
      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic trauma
      I get your sentiment, I feel the same way about these so called professionals. Knowing what's wrong with you is the beginning of the healing process I think. So it's important that they do a proper assessment and tell you what's wrong with you, even if it's a sensitive topic and there is no cure. If they don't know how to do a proper assessment and don't know about these rare symptoms or mechanisms, or what's the latest development in this area, then they need to go and educate themselves. As simple as that.

      I have been abusing my ears for a long time, by listening to music at high volume and using headphones. But it's the acoustic trauma that's the most likely and immediate cause for my tinnitus. The nature of my acoustic trauma was a sudden, intense noise that I was exposed to while using headphones. The result of which is what Myriam Westcott calls acoustic shock. I also have the TTTS and hyperacusis. In fact, I developed TTTS before I developed tinnitus and hyperacusis. That's what I originally started to seek medical help for.

      I have since recovered pretty well I would say, the hyperacusis is minimal to none and TTTS is barely noticeable. What remains is the constant ringing or buzzing sound in my head and the occasional clicks. I do get a stabbing kind of ear pain from time to time, but very seldom.

      The clicks are objectively measurable, they are are not subjective as some of these so called researchers would have you believe when you read about their tinnitus investigations.

      The so called professionals in the clinics will have you believe it's your Eustachian tubes clicking. Unlikely! Not after acoustic shock! After a bad infection?... maybe... but not when you have no signs of ear wax blockage, no signs of middle ear fluid build-up, perfect typanograms and normal audiograms. You tell hem you have been blasted with high intensity sound and they sit and take notes... and then they go on to start theorizing about Eustachian tubes being blocked and clicking... not doing anything to test their theory objectively, they just have a "hunch". It's like they listen to you but they don't hear you, turning their deaf ear to you. I sometimes feel like it's better to go to a cleric or a fortune teller than a doctor. o_O They are at least cheaper and it's easier to get an appointment.
       
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    4. SugarMagnolia
      Jaded

      SugarMagnolia Member Benefactor

      Location:
      USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      It might be safer.

      Me too. My H symptoms are relatively new. Once I read about TTTS, I instantly recognized my symptoms.
       
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    5. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      I used to have TTTS. It took over 6 months for it to get better, and it was mostly gone after 12 months.
       
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    6. vermillion
      No Mood

      vermillion Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Bad luck
      My TTTS haven't got better not a little after 15 months. And tinnitus got worse again the last week. All in all I would say that in the above time span my t has gotten progressively worse in terms of added tones + volume from 1/10 to 5/10 + reactivness + dysacusis. Not even a small positive progression...
       
    7. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      Did you experience setbacks like new acoustic traumas? Have you tried staying away from the moderate noises like that of a vacuum cleaner?
       
    8. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      sjtinguy

      sjtinguy Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise
      The second audiologist I went to has tinnitus herself and also helps facilitate a tinnitus support group.. I don't know why she didn't tell me about TTTS when I described having ear pain sometimes even when the ringing was not increased. I wish she had, but luckily I found the information myself.
       
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    9. Gman
      No Mood

      Gman Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ototoxic earwax drops, worsened by MDs (Muppet Doctors)
      Did you do anything that helped your recovery, or did it just improve over time?
       
    10. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      ASD is excessive middle ear contractions, the stapedius and tensor tympani. The tensor tympani contracts to noise. The stapedius is an acoustic reflex that is triggered by noise. The tympani reflex is a protective reflex. TTTS can include tinnitus, the ear - clicks, flutter, feeling like ear is block or fullness, muffled or distorted hearing, numbness or burning. Irritation of the trigeminal nerve and this can give sensations to the cheeks, neck and TMJ area.

      Studies show that TTTS and ASD is often caused by TMJ and upper cervical spine disorders. This can involve the C1 and C2 being out of alignment. It can be caused by whiplash, injury, falling down, a history of bad posture with too much forward head bending, dental whiplash causing TMJ. TMJ and misalignment of the upper spine can happen together.

      I received my TTTS and ASD from dental whiplash causing misalignment of C1 and C2 as well as TMJ. My TTTS and ASD is mostly gone, but it does sometimes rises again. It's depends on how I baby my neck and TMJ as well as stress. Most with TTTS and ASD otherwise will see complete recovery within months.

      When I think of tinnitus, I think about the neck being out of line. The C1 and C2 area in particular. This can cause more severe tinnitus, ear problems, hyperacusis, TTTS, ASD, TMJ and a full list of other problems, including nerve problems, sore neck muscles that may become unbalance or have pressure arise from the upper spine.
       
    11. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
    12. Samir
      Obedient

      Samir Manager Staff Benefactor Ambassador Advocate

      Location:
      Sweden
      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic trauma
      To tell you the truth I didn't do anything special to get to the stage where I am now. I just waited it out, kept on living and I took better care of my ears. I think those are the main three things; giving myself time to heal, staying busy with work and taking care of my ears. I would lie to you if I told you that I am completely cured. But things did improve over time. Aside from tinnitus, my main problem now are the occasional clicks which disturb my sleep. But I have seen a remarkable improvement in the hyperacusis and TTTS department.
       
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    13. Samir
      Obedient

      Samir Manager Staff Benefactor Ambassador Advocate

      Location:
      Sweden
      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic trauma
      ASD in the context of ear problems stands for Acoustic Shock Disorder. It is the cause, not the effect. It is what triggers abnormal middle ear contractions. Myriam Westcott describes it like this:

      In a wider context of traumatic events, ASD as an abbreviation is used to refer to Acute Stress Disorder, which can develop into PTSD. In fact, Myriam compares acoustic shock disorder to PTSD.

      What is Acoustic shock?
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acoustic_shock

      What is Acute shock disorder/reaction?
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acute_stress_reaction

      What is Tonic tensor tympani syndrome?
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonic_tensor_tympani_syndrome

      Both the tensor tympani and the stapedius are two muscles in the middle ear. They are part of the acoustic reflex. They both contract to noise, the stapedius muscle more so than the tensor tympani, giving the acoustic reflex its nick name "stapedius reflex". The involvment of the tensor tympani muscle in the reflex is not well understood. When exposed to excessively loud noise, the stapedius muscle has the primary protective role. Hence the nick name "stapedius reflex".

      That's not my understanding of it. Tinnitus can accompany many of these symptoms, but it's not a sub-type of TTTS.

      Not many may share my view, but I consider subjective tinnitus to be the only kind of tinnitus. I sometimes come across terms like "objective tinnitus" in research papers. With the risk of being jumped by the so called professionals, I will say that if what you have is objectively measurable, then it's not really tinnitus. I do believe that even subjective tinnitus will become objectively measurable, hopefully in not that far off future. But it all begins with clearing up our own confusion and clearly defining what is what.

      I know almost nothing about the spine, so I will not say much here. I have TMJ (TMD) and TTTS, but my TTTS was not caused by TMD but by the acoustic trauma. Note that everyone has TMJ, but only some of us have TMD. The abbreviation TMD refers to the disorder, TMJ refers to the joint itself, in both health and disease.
       
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    14. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Samir I don't think that we really have different views on ASD and TTTS. I have posted the studies that you refer too.

      Your above statement may have validity. I don't know. Some new thoughts by researchers is that most with tinnitus do have at least a very small amount of hearing loss. My new tinnitus is physical and audio testing showed that I have very little increased hearing loss from testing that was performed after first onset about 7 years ago. Any very slight newer hearing loss may partly be an age factor for me and may be associated with my cervical facet arthritis.

      When I used the term TMJ to my dentist, he said that term is no longer accepted. He said it's all TMD. There's many plays on word as 'objective, subjective, TMJ, TMD, reactive, etc. There are many reasons why some get tinnitus and other related problems. Tinnitus can be caused by body imbalances such as being posture related and physical trauma.

      Thanks for the input, as myself and all of us are not always right. I would expand more in thought with this post, but my T is taking an even more turn.
       
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    15. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Samir Just to note, my post that you made reference to was meant to be directed to @Gman where he also commented to me. My bad, I didn't use his name. This link shows more detailed hyperacusis factors and other contributions to this subject matter.

      Your quote - "Tinnitus can accompany many of these symptoms, but it's not a sub-type of TTTS." I don't see any disagreement from my short statement in post above. With physical T, cause and effect is more parallel.


      http://www.noiseandhealth.org/artic...;issue=63;spage=117;epage=128;aulast=Westcott
       
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    16. Taylorslay
      Happy

      Taylorslay Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      09/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Years of excessively loud headphone use
      For me my TTTS correlates with my sensitive. If something is on the cusp of bothering my H, I experience TTTS. It doesn't bother me too much tbh.
       
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    17. Gman
      No Mood

      Gman Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ototoxic earwax drops, worsened by MDs (Muppet Doctors)
      I think we can agree that TTTS and ASD suck big time. It’s just another layer on top of T and H.
      I never thought psychosomatic was really anything other than jargon. But this experience has taught me it is real. Some of it can be consciously controlled and some can’t. It’s pretty stubborn.

      My perspective is that TTTS/ASD, T and H are all interconnected. When the TTTS and associated symptoms flare (which are very unpleasant and painful - not just fluttering) usually I get a T spike, but not always. Same with H. I’m not sure how this works as the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles are in the middle ear, not cochlear (which is where I assumed most T originates?).

      I had a nice week and a half of being lulled into a false sense of security and actually began to habituate. A slight set back yesterday and now I’m enjoying a worse than usual T spike. It’s a tad demoralising as I can’t seem to predict it or get past it. There were no significant loud noise events except for a speaker phone conference call at work that was a little on the loud side but not significant.
       
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    18. Samir
      Obedient

      Samir Manager Staff Benefactor Ambassador Advocate

      Location:
      Sweden
      Tinnitus Since:
      12/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Accoustic trauma
      Agreed!

      Oh it is very much real.

      It seems to me that it's only those that don't experience it that think it's not real. Well of course it's not real... it's not happening to them... so it's not real to them! It's a similar situation as with tinnitus, the only difference is that tinnitus is more talked about in the public space so it is better imprinted in the collective memory as an actual thing, even though we still can't quite put the finger on what it is, because we don't understand it very well.

      We are more readily prepared to accept it as a real thing when someone walks up to us and says they have tinnitus. More so than if someone walked up to us and said they have TTTS. "Eh?...what the hell is TTTS!?" That's what the reaction would be, more or less.

      If you go to a doctor, he blames your symptoms on the Eustachian tubes. That's what mine said to me, and I see that this is a common pattern when reading posts form other users on this forum. Someone might very well have these or similar symptoms due to Eustachian tube dysfunction. Well... as doctors... that's something they need to figure out, don't they? But they don't do much to actually asses your individual situation and give you some tests where possible to objectively verify their suspicion. They have seen so many "cases" like yours that they have a "hunch" what's going on with you, so they just tell you straight up to clean out the was out of your ears and send you off home. They need to dig deeper, go further, make assertions on a case by case basis, not feel lazy to take out the instruments and not pretend like they have seen it all and know it all. But it's naive to expect that of ordinary doctors. They are no scientists, they don't seek the truth of nature. They are merely medical practitioners. But I still wish they held a higher standard and ambition in their practice.

      I can consciously control my tensor tympani muscles. I have been able to do this for as long as I can remember, long before any of these problems started. I thought that everyone could do that. I didn't even really know what I was doing or what muscles I was activating. I must have been about 10 years old when I realized I could play with my ears in this way. I wish I could rather consciously control the noise in my head. But that's something I can't control. If someone is born that can do that, then we might be able to find a cure much faster.

      The clicks I sometimes hear are involuntary, and since I can control my tensor tympani muscles, I know how to recognize the sound of one vs. the other, so I know it's not my tensor tympani muscles causing the clicks. I would be very surprised if it was that way. It should be fairly easy to devise a test, but who cares about clicking ears, right? Everyone's ears can hear a click, flutter, thump, swoosh, and pop. Or can they?... there is not much interest in objectively verifiable phenomenon. It's much more attractive to chase the elusive and impossible.

      Agreed!

      So the TTTS episode comes first and then the T spike? That's interesting. I had a very bad and long episode of TTTS before I developed T, and before I knew TTTS by its name. There is definitely some connection here, but no one fully understands how this all works. I myself seem to get spikes when my ears are overstimulated with incoming sounds, like when many people are talking at the same time in a room. Thankfully I don't get them very often.

      My current understanding is that the damage originates in the ears, while the subjective tinnitus (which is the only kind in my opinion) originates in the brain. It can take anywhere from 3 to 12 months to fully develop tinnitus following an insult to the ears, such as physicals violence or acoustic trauma including acoustic shocks in call centers or detonating explosives in close proximity. What changes are actually happening in the brain?... that I do not know. There are a couple of interesting theories on that. Something I hope scientists will explore in more detail as we go forward.

      Too many people in the same room? Too much information? As I explained, this is often when my T spikes, when there is too much information coming in that I have to process. The sound level doesn't have to be particularly high for me to get a spike. I would ask everyone to take their turn when they talk, instead of talking into each others mouths as we say.
       
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    19. Gman
      No Mood

      Gman Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ototoxic earwax drops, worsened by MDs (Muppet Doctors)
      I guess I meant psychosomatic in that it is triggered by your thoughts because of how you perceive and somehow feel threatened by sound. It's as much psychological as it is physical. If you feel sounds are damaging, or negative, or anticipate loud sounds the symptoms get worse. The muscles can seize up by thought alone. And on the flipside if you think positively and in a calming way, you are able to reduce it to an extent (although I have discovered there's a limit to how much you can calm it by thoughts alone). If it is meant to be a protective mechanism for your hearing, then it's really dysfunctional.

      Definitely. They just want you out and pay then see the next patient. What ever happened to quality of care? My local doctor had never heard of it, but still prescribed me what I wanted. So at least there's a level of trust in my self diagnosis.

      Same with me. I can isolate the muscles in both ears and make them kind of shudder, which makes my hearing go weird.

      True. If it's not killing you, they don't care. I wonder if they could hear it with a stethoscope?

      Well, yes. I tend to get a pains first. They can be along the side of my tongue and/or back of throat, along the jaw, inside and around the ears. I might get a few thumps in the middle ear here and there sometimes. I feel the muscles starting to contract, cringing inside, causing a tense fullness and ultimately one ear, if I can't stop it, seizes up. This causes horrible hollow imbalanced hearing because of conductive loss - lower frequencies are just not being transmitted to the cochlear. A hum or whoosh sound/sensation accompanies it. Sinuses swell up. Then the T usually spikes and ears feel very sensitive with H makes things get louder. I get neck pain and dizziness too. The pulsatile hum will start up too. Really crappy.

      But it's not clear how TTTS/ASD can make T spike, as they are to do with middle ear. Also, according to the experts, experiencing these symptoms do not harm the ear, therefore shouldn't really cause a spike. For me, I kind of think it's more like an irritation than too much incoming information being processed, but it's an interesting thought.

      I was thinking that somehow consciously and subconsciously your brain is interpreting sounds or anticipating sounds as potentially damaging, therefore goes into protective mode. Anxiety, startle reflex, being on edge, hypervigilance and negative thoughts just feed it.
       
      Last edited: Mar 29, 2018
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    20. lapidus

      lapidus Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Sweden
      Tinnitus Since:
      1999
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      Read this case study (or ask @japongus about these things) . There is a lot we don't know about the middle ear. There exists no such thing as experts in this area yet sadly. The middle ear has simply been neglected.
      https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2017.00420/full
       
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    21. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @lapidus Informative article. The discussion section has been agreement upon by many - pain does connect to the cervical complex and temporal.
       
    22. Gman
      No Mood

      Gman Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ototoxic earwax drops, worsened by MDs (Muppet Doctors)
      Wow awesome. This is great! Better than any doctor's diagnosis!! Thanks for the link @lapidus. This is it then without a doubt.
      Acoustic shock injury with post-trauma trigeminal-autonomic activation. But I already had T and minor fluttering TTTS and H before this. It's so spot on in every detail.

      "In most cases, these symptoms are temporary and disappear within a few hours or days following the acoustic incident. However, in certain cases, they can become chronic and seriously affect quality of life"

      This has happened to me multiple times since it started, so I seem fit into the latter category.
      If only they had a treatment section at the end.
       
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    23. lapidus

      lapidus Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Sweden
      Tinnitus Since:
      1999
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      Yeah, I just wish there were thousand more case studies like this so they could get somewhere treatment wise but sadly it is, like I've said, a neglected area of research.
       
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    24. Greg Sacramento

      Greg Sacramento Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      April 2011
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      syringing and now somatic T dental work
      @Gman Treatment - Magnesium and B12 made a difference for me. I think Botox wears off in 2-3 months.
       
    25. Gman
      No Mood

      Gman Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ototoxic earwax drops, worsened by MDs (Muppet Doctors)
      @Greg Sacramento I have been taking B12 and magnesium too. The only thing that makes it go away is clonazepam. Even if it happens, say, once every 1-3 weeks, I don't want to be having to take this stuff.
       
    26. mattryp
      Alienated

      mattryp Member

      Location:
      Pennsylvania
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise Trauma ~ Wedding Reception
      Thanks so much for posting this, reading this thread has made my night.

      I'm currently suffering a setback, from not protecting my ears around many loud / excited people in a small house (similar situation to what @Samir mentioned above.) My cousins are loud, and many times were talking right into my unprotected ears (was trying not to overprotect), but I know that can't cause damage. My symptoms are everything that TTTS describes, and the T has spiked right along with it. Fullness, pain, increased sound sensitivity, more intrusive T. I was even having those flutter / heartbeat sensations in my right ear, which I haven't gotten in a long while.

      Do you think it's inflammation? I'm starting to think that those muscles become inflamed from over-use, and lowering the inflammation helps get back down to baseline quicker. So I've been taking omegas, eating anti-inflammatory foods, etc. I'm seeing this as something similar to a flare-up. Also, do you think TTTS causes a temporary threshold shift? Our thresholds do shift when these muscles are overworked / inflamed, and cause muffled hearing / other weird symptoms.

      I've been contemplating prednisone after this latest 'acoustic trauma' of mine, but your thread tells me that I should just wait it out. It's not like I attended a 120dB concert or something, I was at my aunt's house, and everyone was talking too loudly for my hyperacusis-ridden mind, haha. So I think I'll just wait it out, this is a muscle thing, no damage done (even though my T and fullness feels monstrous right now.) It's very tricky though, knowing for sure whether or not damage has been done. I suppose we can use the metrics that are already in place, 85dB + duration, and all that.
       
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