Poll: Do You Have a Problem with Misophonia, and If So, Which Sounds?

Discussion in 'Support' started by IvanRus, Apr 20, 2018.

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Do you have a problem with misophonia, and if so, which sounds?

  1. Yes, to grinding the metal

  2. Yes, to squeaky foam

  3. Yes, to scratching the nails on the chalkboard

  4. Yes, to the grinding of the cutlery on the dishes

  5. Yes, to some other sound (write in comments)

  6. No

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
    1. IvanRus

      IvanRus Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      ototoxicity
      Hello!

      I present to you a small poll on the topic "misophonia".

      Misophonia is a sharp disgust, intolerance to certain sounds, manifested from mild discomfort, to pain in the jaw and cramps​
       
    2. PaulBe

      PaulBe Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Cairns
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2013
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Probably sound, though never proven
      Small children.
       
    3. dingaling
      Relaxed

      dingaling Member

      Location:
      London UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown, probably loud music
      Options 1,3 & 4 shouldn't be there in my opinion as virtually every person in the world hates these sounds - not just those with misophonia

      Sorry to derail....
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    4. Tinker Bell

      Tinker Bell Member Hall of Fame

      Location:
      U.S.
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      SSHL from virus
      Right. I think disliking those sounds is not unusual. Misophonia is more than disliking a sound. It’s having anxiety, anger, or fear to a sound.

      This is a good article that talks about “universally disturbing sounds” such as a baby crying versus having a fight or flight response to someone breathing.

      https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/misophonia-sounds-really-make-crazy-2017042111534

      For example, I do not know anyone who likes the sound of nails on a chalkboard. Someone with misophonia would likely panic at the sight of a chalkboard, having anxiety that the sound might be made.
       
      • Agree Agree x 2
      • Like Like x 1
    5. 1MW
      No Mood

      1MW Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2008 but cured and relapsed from benzos
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      ssnhl/benzos/unknown
      I have a problem with noise, for example motorcycles, cars, street noise
       
    6. SugarMagnolia
      Jaded

      SugarMagnolia Member Benefactor

      Location:
      USA
      Tinnitus Since:
      02/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      I don't think I have misophonia. I have anxiety about sounds that I think may be harmful to me. If I were to discover that they are harmless, I would then merely "dislike" them. It's high-pitched tones/beeps that I have trouble with.
       
    7. Gman
      No Mood

      Gman Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ototoxic earwax drops, worsened by MDs (Muppet Doctors)
      I think everyone with T has at least a little bit of phonophobia, even if they aren’t aware of it. How could you not?
       
    8. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      I have no phonophobia and no negativity about my tinnitus. I believe because of my positive outlook on life and I have fully habituated. This doesn't mean I don't have downtimes for life is problematic. The thing to try and do is not let negativity become all consuming. If I were to suddenly hear loud noise in my vicinity, I wouldn't be overly concerned or anxious about it as some people are. This is not to say that I wouldn't use hearing protection when I think it is appropriate to do so. It is negative thinking about tinnitus, hyperacusis and the overuse of hearing protection when it isn't necessary, that often delays or prevents the habituation process happening.

      Michael
       
    9. dingaling
      Relaxed

      dingaling Member

      Location:
      London UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      unknown, probably loud music
      Misophonia is usually assocated with quiet(er) sounds as per TinkerBell's link above that trigger annoyance. It is not normally associated witb loud sounds
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    10. Gman
      No Mood

      Gman Member Benefactor

      Tinnitus Since:
      07/2016
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Ototoxic earwax drops, worsened by MDs (Muppet Doctors)
      For you to say you have absolutely zero aversion to loud sounds and evaluate sounds from a purely rational, machine-like point of view, then that's great. Well done. :beeranimation:
      I guess I should have said a certain level of aversion to loud sounds or particular types of sounds, rather than phonophobia which is at the more extreme end of the scale. And this thread is about misophonia anyway. My mistake.
       
      Last edited: Apr 22, 2018
    11. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Noise induced
      I treat loud sounds exactly the same as if I didn't have tinnitus. Of course if sound levels are loud enough they can become uncomfortable just the same as someone that doesn't have tinnitus. It is fear, anxiety, negative thinking and the overuse and misuse of hearing protection that often prolongs people suffering with tinnitus and hyperacusis. If they are not careful, problems such as phonohobia and misophonia will develope. My post: The complexities of tinnitus and hyperacusis, below explaines this in more detail.

      The complexities of Tinnitus and hyperacusis.

      This post is based on my experience with tinnitus and hyperacusis, caused by “exposure to loud noise”. I have also corresponded with people affected by these conditions and their experiences have helped me to write this piece. Please read it as information only. It is not a substitute for medical advice as each person’s circumstances will be different.

      Thank you
      Michael Leigh

      Tinnitus is a common condition that many people are able to cope with without it causing too much difficulty in their life. Therefore, it is often treated as a minor inconvenience because it rarely requires being under the care of an ENT clinic. Please ask members of your family, friends or co-workers whether they have experienced it or have the condition and you’ll probably be told: “I get that but just ignore it”. “I only hear mine when it’s quiet but it’s nothing”. “It plays a tune and then it’s gone”. These are just a few examples of what you are likely to hear by those that are not aware or have any inclination of the effects tinnitus can have on a person when it is loud and intrusive. If this intensity is sustained for long periods it can become very debilitating. Fortunately, with time and in some cases with treatment, many people are able to habituate and go on to lead a fulfilling life doing all the things that they want to.

      With most things there are exceptions and tinnitus is no different. If a person also has hyperacusis, which isn’t uncommon with loud noise exposure, it can complicate matters. If the hyperacusis doesn’t improve by itself or is left untreated further problems may result. This can manifest itself in a variety of ways that I touched on in my post: Hyperacusis, as I see it.

      Some people regard earplugs and earmuffs a necessary requirement to protect themselves from any potential loud noise and will even use them to suppress normal everyday sounds. They will go further and choose not to leave their home unless it’s absolutely necessary. This is done because of their hypersensitivity to sound and believe, their condition will be made worse by environmental sounds that will cause spikes in the tinnitus. Spikes can be distressing and typically last a few hours but are known to last days. However, if one isn’t careful the problem can be made worse and this is well documented in the medical field, as a lowering of the loudness threshold of the auditory system often results with the overuse of hearing protection making it more sensitive to sound.

      If this is practice is continued, one not only has tinnitus and hyperacusis to deal with and the emotional stress that comes with them. They also risk developing other psychological problems that are associated with intolerance to sound. The hypersensitivity to everyday sounds caused by hyperacusis and the overuse of hearing protection instils negative thinking and can lead to Phonophobia - an overwhelming fear of sound. Often an affected person will spend a lot time monitoring sound levels in their immediate environment and even use sound level meters as their concerns for intolerance to sound grows. They will use earplugs or earmuffs sometimes both to protect themselves even from low level sounds they believe will cause harm to their auditory system. Unfortunately, this can become an obsession and a vicious cycle of overprotection of hyperacusis and phonophobia develops and can become a big problem if one isn’t careful.

      If this situation isn’t addressed and some form of help is not sought, then things can become more problematic. Some people with tinnitus, hyperacusis and phonophobia can develop a condition called: Misophonia. It is having an extreme emotional reaction to typically occurring sounds. This does not mean hating sounds in general. It is having a dislike for specific sounds known as “trigger” sounds. It is also known as: selective sound sensitivity syndrome. Misophonia does not mean one is sensitive to how loud the sound is or its volume as with hyperacusis. Neither is it having a fear of the sound, which is phonophobia.

      Some people that are highly sensitive may be irritated or get very upset to be around continual intrusive sounds. Their level of tolerance to deal with these obnoxious situations is not as high as with other people. For instance, a highly sensitive person might hear a car drive by and isn’t bothered by it. However, if they know they are going to be hearing that sound all day long and it’s going to be intrusive in their life then they start becoming very upset. This is not misophonia. By contrast, a person that is highly sensitive can also have misophonia. Meaning they can be sensitive to certain sounds but they are not misophonic sounds (trigger sounds). Misophonia is not adversely reacting to fingernails being dragged on a chalkboard, a baby crying, a knife being scored along a bottle or the sound of a disc grinder. These are classed as normal sounds that one might not like and find them bothersome.

      Misophonia is an immediate reaction to a “trigger sound” that promotes an involuntary emotional response. An affected person can be overcome with rage, anger and even hate towards a sound or someone making a sound they are acutely intolerant to. Not only do they hear it but feel the distress the trigger sound is causing them. For example, the sound of someone eating an apple, the popping of chewing gum or the slurping of a drink or soup, can affect someone with this condition quite severely. They will immediately want to get away and run for cover or feel the need to confront the offensive source. Often this is just a feeling and actual physical intervention is not usually carried out.

      I have only touched the surface of phonophobia and misophonia. These are separate conditions that can affect a person that does not have tinnitus or hyperacusis.

      Tinnitus and hyperacusis can be complex and each person will experience them differently. A lot depends on the make up of a person. Whether they are positive or negative thinking can affect the way they look at life and the goals they want to reach. If a person has had one or both of these conditions for a while, typically over a year and have not habituated or noticed some improvement, or feel their symptoms are getting worse. I advise them to try and seek professional help with a Hearing Therapist or Audiologist that specialises in the treatment and management of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Counselling is usually helpful and medication maybe suggested too. This can help prevent conditions like phonophobia and misophonia taking hold.

      Michael

      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/hyperacusis-as-i-see-it.19174/
       
      • Creative Creative x 1
    12. Ento
      Wishful

      Ento Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Northern Europe
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma? Stress? Both?
      Smacking and eating noises. Drives me crazy. Had it since I was a small kid.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    13. Jcb
      No Mood

      Jcb Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      December 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      possible TMJ, came on after severe cold and chest infection,
      I actually depise eating noises, this was even before I got T. Something about chewing and smacking of lips that gets me so annoyed, to the point were I want take their food and drinks away and throw them in the bin :banghead:
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    14. Ento
      Wishful

      Ento Member Benefactor

      Location:
      Northern Europe
      Tinnitus Since:
      01/2018
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic trauma? Stress? Both?
      Yes, exactly. It's a socially debilitating condition. You want to avoid places where people eat. Problem is when your parents/siblings/partner/kids make these noises. You can neither run away nor punch them, so you just suffer.

      I have had misophonia some 40+ years, long before my T.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    15. Jcb
      No Mood

      Jcb Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      December 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      possible TMJ, came on after severe cold and chest infection,
      Exactly, it’s so annoying. In a restaurant, I’m normally not that bad oddly enoughas I can’t seem to hear them chewing etc it’s just so odd as it can make me so angry.
       

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