Should I Listen to My Tinnitus in Order to Get Accustomed to It?

Discussion in 'Support' started by MichaelP, Nov 30, 2019 at 7:37 AM.

    1. MichaelP

      MichaelP Member

      Location:
      New Zealand (from England)
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown - Potentially noise/stress
      I have only had tinnitus about 3 weeks and I would say it was mild, although I seem to be increasingly getting a much louder ring in my right ear which is staying longer than it had previously, which I find a little worrying.

      My question is, whether to listen to the tinnitus in order to get accustomed to it, or to ignore it to try and get my brain to not focus on it and hope it diminishes or goes away.

      I've read about people saying that they sit and listen to their tinnitus in silence to get used to it; notice your reaction and aversion to it, notice how you want it to go away but can't, try to not see it as a threat and find peace with it and ultimately habituate to it.

      Or, as an audiologist I saw told me, to try and ignore the high-pitched rings and other sounds as much as possible by playing pink noise and nature sounds to mask it, or try and stay active to avoid thinking about it. She said this was in order to try and get my brain to stop focusing on it and to hope that it disappears by trying to get the brain just to see it as a background noise that can be ignored.

      Granted I have only had it a little over 3 weeks and it is mostly a mild case (although, as I said, I seem to have gotten more longer random loud spikes today, whereas previous days they had been pretty short).
      So maybe it's because mine is fairly mild that I've been given that advice, because it's recent and my brain is still adjusting to it??

      Not really sure which tact is best to take though, or perhaps they each have their own place?

      Any thoughts or suggestions from advice you've been told/experience?

      Thank you!
      Michael
       
    2. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      HI @MichaelP

      Everything you are going through is quite normal in the early stages of tinnitus which you are in. This process takes time months to get used to or for your brain to adapt. You have to realize that it's your brain that is focusing on something that wasn't previously there. I have mentioned this in many of my posts and articles in this forum. Please click on the links below and take your time to read through the articles. If you have read some of them I advise you to read them again. Repeat the process as this helps to reinforce positive thinking. Do not just skim though the text in a hurry as you will not absorb and retain the information. The advice I have given is a form of counselling and it takes time to absorb and fully understand what tinnitus is about and how it affects us. If you have a printer, I strongly advise you to print my articles and refer to them often. It is your choice but if you want to make this process easier for yourself, then I advise you to print my articles.

      The worst thing that you can do is sit and listen to your tinnitus. Believe me it is the worst thing so don't do it. I explain the reasons in many of my articles in the links below. During the day play low level sound enrichment in the background. This can be music or nature sounds whatever you find suitable. It is important that you do not mask the tinnitus. Don't mask the tinnitus so it can't be heard as you will be making habituation more difficult.

      Follow the advice that I have given in the links. This is engaging in things you like to do. Going out with friends etc. You are in the very early stages of tinnitus but things will improve with time and patience.

      All the best
      Michael

      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/new-to-tinnitus-what-to-do.12558/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/tinnitus-a-personal-view.18668/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/hyperacusis-as-i-see-it.19174/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/acquiring-a-positive-mindset.23969/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/tinnitus-and-the-negative-mindset.23705/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/the-habituation-process.20767/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/is-positivity-important.23150/
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    3. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      MichaelP

      MichaelP Member

      Location:
      New Zealand (from England)
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown - Potentially noise/stress
      Hi Michael,

      I will take time to read them more carefully. As I've mentioned in my original post though, I've been hearing/reading conflicting information, hence asking for some clarification/advice on what best to do.

      I feel that if I am playing music under the level of my tinnitus that I will just be sitting and listening to it (if I'm on my laptop or reading etc.). Although I will give it a go.

      So, in your opinion, the audiologist was incorrect in her advice that I should block the tinnitus out in order to try and get the brain/myself to forget about it and it go away?

      Thanks again,
      Michael
       
    4. Bill Bauer
      No Mood

      Bill Bauer Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      February, 2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Acoustic Trauma
      It takes 1-2 years to get habituated. Yes, it is better to try to not dwell on it. The sounds of crickets work well at masking high pitch tinnitus. Note, the goal is not to play it so loud that you can't hear your tinnitus, the idea is to give yourself something else to listen to besides your tinnitus. You might continue to focus on your own tinnitus during the first 10 minutes, but hopefully eventually you will begin listening to the crickets.

      Do you know why you might be getting those spikes? Could it be exposure to moderate noises like those made by a vacuum cleaner or a hair dryer?

      Check out
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/thread...eone-else-who-has-tinnitus.26850/#post-307822
       
    5. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      HI @MichaelP

      I do not know everything about tinnitus no-one can. However, I have had noise induced tinnitus for 23 years and have corresponded with many people and counselled them too. Noise induce tinnitus is my main concern and this is what I advise on. I didn't want to say what I'm about to but I think it is now necessary. I know you are new to tinnitus and want to gain as much information as possible but you need to be very careful how this is done. There is a lot of information in forums and at websites that give information that will not help you. If you must read up on information get it from people that are experienced with "noise induced tinnitus". People that live with the condition for over 2 years and have fully habituated. I also advise you not to use headphones even at low volume.

      My advice to you is not to Mask your tinnitus with either playing music or nature sounds. The reason I have explained in my link: New to tinnitus what to do. I will paste it below. If you mask your tinnitus so it can't be heard, as soon as the masking sound/music is stopped your brain will immediately focus on it and it will often appear to be louder. Continue playing your music slightly below the tinnitus or try the Mixing point. This is where the external sound blends with the tinnitus. I don't particularly like this method but it works for some people.

      As I have mentioned quite a few times in my posts to you. You are in the very early stages of tinnitus. Everything that you are going through is normal and it's a process. If you are feeling overly stressed, worried which is also quite normal, then speak to your family doctor. As I type I can hear by tinnitus quite noticeably, and I haven't got my sound machine on in the background. However, I have habituated for many years and what I'm hearing at the moment doesn't bother me in the slightest. Saying that, I have variable tinnitus. It can be: Completely quiet, Mild, Moderate, Severe or Very severe requiring me to take medication to help reduce the noise.

      All the best
      Michael


      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/new-to-tinnitus-what-to-do.12558/
       
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    6. Tybs

      Tybs Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Fall from stairs
      I fully agree with your points of not completely masking T, but saying listening to it is the worst thing one can do is simply not true. It is what I did, and it turned out to be the first step for me to get a normal life again. I'm perfectly willing to believe it does not work for everyone, every individual responds and functions differently: but we can't treat this condition in a black and white way. It is one's own journey to find out what works for them, and what does not. I know that being able to have my T around without being afraid for quiet places and without having dependencies on medicines or external equipment is of great value to me.

      @MichaelP
      Read and consider the info that @Michael Leigh gives, he has quite some knowledge on the subject.

      Should you consider getting rid of your fear by listening, then I have some points to add. Keep in mind that this is based on my own experiences, the only far-related science in it is the basis for TRT.

      - Don't actively listen for longer than 10 minutes a day, preferably 5. Other activities should have your main focus, otherwise your T could become an obsession.
      - When listening, use a quiet room without distractions.
      - While listening, don't force yourself to keep listening. Sooner or later, your mind starts to wander off, which is a good thing: it means your thoughts are getting focus despite the presence of T. I noticed this effect already near the end of my first session, and it only increased in further sessions.
      - Once you feel that your fight/flee trigger is gone, you can quit the sessions. I stopped after two weeks, as it was no longer necessary.
      - Being scared of the first sessions is normal. However, if this fear does not subside at all during the first week, then I'd recommend to quit the sessions and find another way to cope. As I mentioned earlier, every individual responds differently: seek out something that actually works for you. You'll find a way :)
       
      • Like Like x 1
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    7. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      @Tybs

      I have already given my advice to @MichaelP and do not wish to dwell on this topic further. However, since you have quoted my post I will respond.

      You have had tinnitus for a very short while and in addition to this, if I understand the information on your Avatar, your tinnitus was caused my a fall from the stairs. I am sorry to hear it resulted in you developing tinnitus and hope that you continue to make sustained improvement.

      MichaelP's tinnitus is "Noise induced" which a different type of tinnitus from yours or when it has developed from an underlying medical condition. People with noise induced tinnitus, which is mostly what I advise on, often have some over sensitivity to sound caused by noise trauma to the auditory system which often affects the auditory pathways or gateways in the brain. This over sensitivity varies in intensity and some people develop hyperacusis. Hyperacusis often accompanies tinnitus when it was caused by noise trauma and is not usually present, in people with tinnitus caused by an underlying medical condition or from a hit on the head or as in your case fall down a stairs.

      I stand by everything that I have said and advised @MichaelP that it is not a good idea to sit and listen to his tinnitus. The reason being, it will make his brain focus more on the noise and if he's not careful, it can make the tinnitus become louder and more intrusive. It is for the reason most Audiologists and Hearing Therapists, that practice tinnitus and hyperacusis management and treatment with tinnitus patients, advise against deliberately sitting in silence and listening to tinnitus. As I have said, your tinnitus is not Noise induced and therefore is quite different, as your auditory system has not been traumatized by sound.

      I have had TRT twice in the 23 years that I have had tinnitus. I have also written articles on the treatment which are available on my started threads, in this forum. I do not recommend anyone with tinnitus to start TRT until they have had tinnitus for at least 4 months preferably 6 months. My reasons are explained in my articles on TRT. Some people may find counselling helpful with a Hearing Therapist or Audiologist in early stages of tinnitus and beyond. However, long term treatments such as TRT and CBT my advice is to leave at least 6 months before starting these treatments.

      Michael
       
      • Like Like x 2
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    8. MattS
      Relaxed

      MattS Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Power Tools
      Hi @MichaelP

      @Michael Leigh does know an awful lot on this topic. And so you should hear him and consider his thoughts. I do, often (and as you know, I just forwarded you to some of his thoughts re hyperacusis in another thread).

      He is, however, also very rigid, very sure of himself, and very unwilling to consider the possibility that others may have additional insights to add. Given how little *anyone* really knows about tinnitus, that has always rubbed me sideways.

      Definitely @Michael Leigh's ideas, based on TRT, are worth knowing. TRT has helped many, and does have a modicum of scientific evidence behind it. So I don't mean to discount anything he's suggested for you.

      But do know, as Tybs suggested, that the tinnitus path is often a very personal one, and that what works for one person may not necessarily work for another. So try Leigh's ideas if they resonate with you; hopefully they work. But as you're already aware there are varying ideas out there (and TRT definitely does NOT work for everyone). So keep an open mind, try not to fear the tinnitus sounds, and do whatever feels best for you re moving on with your life.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    9. dan
      Chatty

      dan Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2011
      Then I'm sorry but it does not seem that you are habituated. Try to habituate to very severe tinnitus.
       
    10. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      @dan

      Please don't be sorry for you are entitled to your opinion. With respect and I sincerely mean that, it is you that are wrong, for I assure you that I have one hundred percent habituated. Habituating to tinnitus comes in different forms and no two people will experience it the same even though it means the same thing for each individual that has habituated. By now you might believe I've totally lost the plot and trying to confuse you, that I promise you is not what I'm trying to do.

      A person can have raging tinnitus not necessarily all of the time and still habituate to the condition. Habituating to tinnitus means a person is able to live with it and here is the key: fully accepts it along with all its idiosyncrasies. My good friend @fishbone and someone that I have a lot of respect for, has vast experience and understanding of tinnitus. What he doesn't know about the condition and how it affects a person's mental and emotional wellbeing will probably fit on the back of a postage stamp. He has loud tinnitus and has fully habituated because he has accepted it and is able to do everything that he wants to in life and yet, he still has difficult days which can leave him feeling discontent perhaps even negative. There is absolutely nothing wrong in feeling negative or despondent about the way tinnitus makes you feel because we are human and life is problematic. The thing that is of utmost importance is not to allow negativity to become all consuming. This type of resilience which has to be learnt, takes time and has another name that I and fellow veterans often talk about it's called positivity.

      I have said in my post: The habituation process, in the link below, that tinnitus can present difficult problems and it should be noted, not everyone can habituate or in other words accept tinnitus. It doesn't mean there is anything wrong with a particular individual on the contrary, it is just the way this condition affects a person's mental and emotional wellbeing. Some people may need to be on medication to help make their lives more tolerable with tinnitus, but this shouldn't be viewed they are lacking in any way.

      I wish you well.
      Michael

      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/the-habituation-process.20767/
       
      • Agree Agree x 2
      • Like Like x 1
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    11. fishbone
      Shitfaced

      fishbone Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      1988
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      loud noise and very bad sickness
      First of all, in response to OP and his question, my answer is no. It's actually the opposite, the less we listen to it the further we can get in our tinnitus journey. People that constantly scan or listen for their tinnitus can possibly build an obsession and get fixated on their tinnitus. All this does is simply annoy the ringing and mentally it can lead us into negative thoughts and possible patterns. Do what you can to NOT listen for it, it's hard to do this but I been at this 31 years and I listened to it to when mine was very mild.

      Now it's hell level intrusive, it's impossible to not hear it. I do hear it but I just treat it as a friend and not a foe. I do NOT give the tinnitus power to control my emotions, not at all. It takes time to develop this type of mentality towards the tinnitus. it takes daily actions and constant support.

      @Michael Leigh

      Habituation is very difficult when the tinnitus is constant, severe and hell level. My case is a little tougher because I have extremely bad hearing as well and my tinnitus has covered my hearing, so I face two severe issues. I have had to adjust and re-do my life in many ways to accommodate what i face every second I live. I would take severe T any day over having almost little to no little hearing left. All in all, I am still grateful and I am still resourceful with my ways and techniques and my actions to live with this beast that afflicts me 24/7. I never had an easy life, and I wear many badges of pain and the tinnitus/hearing loss is just another one.

      Severe T/Hearing loss is a tough road to travel through, but it's a reality I face and I accept it. For those that face severe T, I encourage to possibly make use of low sound enrichment. Having the brain hear a nicer/gentle sound at low volumes can be helpful. Possibly seek therapy (just talk to someone,do not go at it alone). It's a tough road, we need support and a daily plan of action to deal with our tinnitus journey.
       
      • Helpful Helpful x 2
      • Winner Winner x 2
      • Agree Agree x 1
    12. Tybs

      Tybs Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Fall from stairs
      This is something I can definitely agree with. Once T becomes an obsession, you're going down a slippery slope that's hard to escape from.

      @Michael Leigh and @fishbone are both veterans concerning tinnitus, IMO that gives them more credibility than me right now. Sure, I had my way of dealing with it and it worked so far: yet again, I can't look into the future, for all we know some major breakdown could eventually show up. Or it works out fine: simply no one can tell. No backsies here, I'm still convinced that this was the way to go for me, but my time of coping so far is relatively short, so I don't have much data to fall back on.

      Perhaps the question itself of "should I listen" isn't really the core issue here: it's more about "how do I deal with it?", where listening or not is simply a subissue. As far as my main input here goes: don't let it become that obsession. Distraction in itself is always a safe option, so it makes sense to choose that route first. Listening and getting used to it can always be an option later, if other paths don't seem to work.
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    13. MattS
      Relaxed

      MattS Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Power Tools
      No disrespect intended (thought I recognize it may not be interpreted that way), but there's been a little voice in my head asking me whether we (as a community) are wise to be putting more weight/credibility in the advice of those who have been suffering the longest. Yes, on the one hand, they are veterans and understand the disorder better. No question there. But there's also something to be said for the advice that comes from those who were able to devise solutions that worked for them more quickly. Not sure... just the thoughts swimming through my head.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    14. Tybs

      Tybs Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Fall from stairs
      I understand your point. The risk in only relying on experience is that there is no more room for new insights.

      In an earlier post you mentioned that @Michael Leigh can be quite rigid and unwilling to accept other options. This is actually the same impression that I got shortly after I started reading topics on tinnitustalk: an often occurring statement "I'm not gonna discuss this" actually annoyed me at the time, as it felt like saying "I'm right, just accept it".

      However, over the weeks my opinion about this attitude changed. I saw that M.L. was very involved in the forum, and writing posts and retrieving information can take a lot of time. I also noticed that he actually did alter in opinions a bit as time progressed: no 180 turns, but he does account for new scientific information, and he does keep personal experiences in mind. I came to the conclusion that he simply does not have the time to enter discussions in every single topic: he gives his opinion and relevant info, and lets the (often new T) posters figure things out for themselves. When inquired, he does address specific details and keeps it at that. With all the posts around (tinnitustalk is véry active for a forum), this is a practical approach, and one that is very valuable.

      We as "newbies" bring in new experiences and share our insights and recent research developments that we happen to find, since (on average) a newcomer is very motivated to do this. We have the discussions and add a different value there. As long as veterans retain an open mind, I think it's fair to expect that they have solid considerations on new input, based on their expanded experience.

      In short: I think there are just different kinds of value. If all of us keep giving our type of input when needed, we will eventually (help science to) figure this out together.
       
      • Like Like x 2
    15. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      You make an interesting point @MattS and I see no disrespect intended. Tinnitus comes in many forms and intensities and no two people will experience it the same. Some people can habituate to tinnitus quickly while it takes longer for others. It all depends how an individual is affected by the condition. The advice I or anyone else gives, whether a veteran or someone that's a newbie or those seasoned to tinnitus for a while, is all valid information if it helps someone.

      Take care
      Michael
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    16. AJS2010

      AJS2010 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown
      Hi Michael

      On my 3rd week with Tinnitus. Today has been the worst day, really loud.

      You say we shouldn't be using headphones, would that include when we're using them for masking noise or spoken word podcasts (these help me sleeping)



      Thanks
      AJ
       
    17. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      @Tybs

      Tybs, I want to thank you for writing your post as it did bring a smile to my face whilst reading it. I am pleased that you are starting to understand what I am about although others may not share your view of me and that's fine, because one is entitled to their opinion. I was listening to a radio -phone-in show earlier. The presenter is very knowledgeable about political affairs in the UK and around the world and a disgruntled caller said to him:
      you come across as a know it all and your way is right and everyone else is wrong. You refuse to listen to anyone else's opinions
      . Hmm I thought.

      Take care
      Michael
       
      • Like Like x 1
    18. Tybs

      Tybs Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      04/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Fall from stairs
      For the record, there are plenty of times I disagree with your view: but I know that that's fine with you. And just as often you have valid arguments (like the sound-induced part you explained earlier in this topic), and then I have no problem in adjusting my own opinion.

      Thanks you for the time you invest in fellow T sufferers, I believe this comes from a good heart :)
       
      • Like Like x 2
    19. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      HI @AJS2010

      Any advice that I give in this forum is just intended to be used as a guidance, because tinnitus can be complex and will affect each person differently. What might work for one person might not for another and vice versa. On your Avatar is reads: Cause of tinnitus unknown. My advice not to use headphones to listen to music or speech is intended for people that have noise induced tinnitus. Typically, this results from using headphones at too high a volume or going to places where loud music is played: clubs, concerts or working in a noisy environment. As I have said this is just advice. If your tinnitus wasn't noise induced then I still advise caution when using headphones. If you find using headphones helpful and listening to podcasts and have no adverse effects, then I think you should continue using them if you want to.

      Hope this helps.
      Michael

      PS: Please note, it is not always a good idea to mask the tinnitus so it cannot be heard. The reason being, the brain can find it more difficult to habituate to tinnitus if it's unable to hear it. Try setting the volume slightly lower than the tinnitus instead of completely masking it. Please click on the links below and read my posts which you might find helpful.

      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/new-to-tinnitus-what-to-do.12558/
      https://www.tinnitustalk.com/threads/tinnitus-a-personal-view.18668/
       
    20. AJS2010

      AJS2010 Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      Nov 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown

      Thank you very much, appreciated. Been really stressed out with this and have been looking for info everywhere, this is the first forum where I am finding useful advice. Did a MRI last week and will see the audiologist on Wednesday for a test and the consultant right after. Thank you again.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    21. Mister Muso
      Busy

      Mister Muso Member

      Location:
      Scotland
      Tinnitus Since:
      2007 / April 2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Loud music
      I would say not to go out of your way to listen to your tinnitus.

      In my limited experience of 7 months, if you do happen to notice your tinnitus, that's the time to note your reaction. But then straight away focus on other sounds around you, and you may even notice your tinnitus getting quieter in the same moment. That's where sound enrichment can help, whether a fan, nature sounds or soft music through a speaker, as long as it doesn't aggravate your tinnitus.
       
      • Like Like x 1
    22. jasonbourne

      jasonbourne Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      2017
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      noise
      Don't mask tinnitus. Your brain needs to listen to it in order learn to filter it out. Only mask it on days of great anxiety. Your masking noise isn't going to be with you all the time.

      You won't ever get used to your tinnitus, but the periods of where it distresses you will decrease with time (hopefully in your case).
       
      • Like Like x 1
    23. MattS
      Relaxed

      MattS Member

      Tinnitus Since:
      06/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Power Tools
      If I can try to sum up slightly:

      I think that whether you listen to it, you mask under it, or you mask over it, may depend entirely on the type of person you are.

      Some people are obsessive/addictive types, whose brain can lock onto something and then have a hard time ever letting it go. This type of person may do best with listening under their tinnitus sounds, TRT-style, to try to offer some distracting sounds in a way that can slowly untrain their brain.

      Some people are susceptible to anxiety/depression, and don't handle frustration and fear all that well. These people may do well to mask over their tinnitus, to forget it about it often as possible.

      And some people may be neither addictive nor anxious, and find that the best way to allay their fears is always just to face them head on. These people my wish to listen into their sounds like @jasonbourne, and allow the sounds to slowly lose their meaning and hold on their brain.

      Is one way better than the other? Not necessarily. But different things may work for different people, and what helps one person may be poison for another.
      We all know ourselves best, and we all need to choose the path that seems best for us.
       
      • Helpful Helpful x 1
    24. AUTHOR
      AUTHOR
      MichaelP

      MichaelP Member

      Location:
      New Zealand (from England)
      Tinnitus Since:
      11/2019
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      Unknown - Potentially noise/stress
      I just wanted to say thank you to everyone who has commented on my post with their advice.

      There are now far too many comments for me to reply to everyone, but I have read all of them and taken all of your suggestions on board.

      Cheers!
      Michael
       
    25. fishbone
      Shitfaced

      fishbone Member Hall of Fame

      Tinnitus Since:
      1988
      Cause of Tinnitus:
      loud noise and very bad sickness
      Tinnitus is such a wide scope of things going on. It's impossible to 100% get a handle on it, we can try one thing and then the tinnitus could possibly react differently. I share my knowledge based on 31 years of experience of living with tinnitus. I have dealt with all levels of tinnitus that has had to offer me and my hearing is at it's worst that it has ever been and seems to not get any better.

      A solution for a tinnitus problem, could possibly be many things to many people. My posts are simply based on the progression of my tinnitus and what I have picked up through out the decades that I have battled it. I like to read posts and possible ways of coping and moving forward with tinnitus FROM those that have been dealing with it for a LONG time. People like @Michael Leigh have been dealing with it for 23+ years and he has tried and experimented with many ways to cope, adjust and move ahead.

      I have bought almost all pills, supplements, done everything to get this ringing to stop for 31 years. My advice I give is from trying, trying, trying and still trying. I pass on my knowledge to this forum and help people. Hopefully majority of the people here will never have my ears and my situation. That's why I post and help people avoid my situation.

      Take advice from whoever you like, If it helps you out, then that's all that matters :)
       
      • Agree Agree x 1
    26. Michael Leigh

      Michael Leigh Member Benefactor Hall of Fame

      Location:
      Brighton, UK
      Tinnitus Since:
      April /1996
      You provide a treasure trove of information here and throughout the many posts that you have written in this forum @fishbone I wish I had this information twenty three years ago. I hope those new to tinnitus, realise just how fortunate that are to have your wealth of knowledge, on-tap 24/7 completely free of charge!

      Michael
       

Share This Page

Loading...